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Magnetic Drill Vise

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  • mickeyf
    replied
    Lately I've been using one of these things a lot - directly on small work, or sometimes I use it to clamp the vice itself. Either way, it clamps the work tightly to the table. A very thin piece does require a packing piece as it only tightens to maybe 6 mm from the table surface.

    Click image for larger version

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

    JR, what you describe is sort of what I was thinking might be nice. Having something like a cam lock drill press vise and a mag vise upside down, bolted to the vise, then you could slide the whole unit. Lots of weight though, so it probably wouldn't be very friction free. Your method would be better for that. I haven't found the need yet on my big drill press, typically I just slide parts around and bolt them down or move the table. Maybe someday I'll try it.

    But I don't think holding small parts on a magnetic chuck alone is a good idea like the original question.
    Not trying to derail magnetic idea, as far a Vise goes been extremely happy with my Heinrich 30 with added Triball for ease compared to sliding handle.Opening to
    10-1/4”,it’s very sturdy and very straight forward design.The Gal I chatted with from Heinrich said it been around forever,nearly as old as dirt lol! Click image for larger version

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    FOLLOW UP - It's good to know what doesn't work.

    I made a drill press "stop" using a MOT secondary & full wave rectified 70v. I had measured the grip of this setup with a crane scale and it was 600, 800, 1000lbs?? A lot. On the drill press I used it to stop the work from rotating, not to hold it down. I.e., the work was a lever with its fulcrum at the drill bit & MOT magnet at its farthest point.

    It worked, kind of. The limitation was with short work pieces: while the magnet had a lot of tensile force, its shear force was much less and with a short lever arm it couldn't hold the work. By "short" I mean 2-3", IIRC. It worked fine with longer work (>4" or so).

    So, it was no good for short work and long work I hand-hold*, leaving medium length as MOT magnet territory. Which wasn't worth it & I dismantled it.


    * - I know, I know ... hand-holding work is BAD. I've done it & I will continue to do it, so don't go OSHA on me.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by vpt View Post
    I know with my drill press I drill aluminum, wood, plastics, rubber, stainless, etc just as much if not more than actual steel.
    No problem......

    Originally posted by JRouche View Post
    .....

    I use mine as a final cclamping down deal. I clamp the part in a large iron DP vice and slide it around on the mag vice till I am under the drill point then hit the power button on the device and it locks the DP vice down very tight. I also included a degaussing switch to do that. JR

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  • vpt
    replied
    I know with my drill press I drill aluminum, wood, plastics, rubber, stainless, etc just as much if not more than actual steel.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Dunc View Post
    I know nothing.


    Any other thoughts appreciated. Thanks!
    Thats my buyline. JR

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

    JR, what you describe is sort of what I was thinking might be nice. Having something like a cam lock drill press vise and a mag vise upside down, bolted to the vise, then you could slide the whole unit. Lots of weight though, so it probably wouldn't be very friction free. Your method would be better for that. I haven't found the need yet on my big drill press, typically I just slide parts around and bolt them down or move the table. Maybe someday I'll try it.

    But I don't think holding small parts on a magnetic chuck alone is a good idea like the original question.
    Yeah, what I have in my home garage is not the standard type garage around here. They dont have drill presses and would prolly ask why do you need a drill press.

    So my small DP does have a nice table attached. So I can slide the 12x24" mag around, or remove it for big stuff. It is only a experiment for me.

    I dont need that much holding. I wanted to make the very simple power supply.

    Umm. Its a nice chuck once I dialed it in. I can bore a 1" bit through 1" mild steel after a piolet hole of around the 1/8-1/4" sises in the box.

    Nuthing moves on the deck, just flat shavings. JR

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post
    I like the idea of a mag chuck on a drill press. I did something similar and posted the electrical device I use to power it.

    Mine is a 12x24" walker mag chuck I scored at an auction. No power supply included.

    I didnt want to fry the coil so adherence to the 1 amp label on the chuck was used.

    I use mine as a final cclamping down deal. I clamp the part in a large iron DP vice and slide it around on the mag vice till I am under the drill point then hit the power button on the device and it locks the DP vice down very tight. I also included a degaussing switch to do that. JR
    JR, what you describe is sort of what I was thinking might be nice. Having something like a cam lock drill press vise and a mag vise upside down, bolted to the vise, then you could slide the whole unit. Lots of weight though, so it probably wouldn't be very friction free. Your method would be better for that. I haven't found the need yet on my big drill press, typically I just slide parts around and bolt them down or move the table. Maybe someday I'll try it.

    But I don't think holding small parts on a magnetic chuck alone is a good idea like the original question.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Good idea.

    Not having a mag chuck, I just put an x-y on the DP, and the DP vise on that. The mag chuck is faster and easier than cranking on the x-y.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    I like the idea of a mag chuck on a drill press. I did something similar and posted the electrical device I use to power it.

    Mine is a 12x24" walker mag chuck I scored at an auction. No power supply included.

    I didnt want to fry the coil so adherence to the 1 amp label on the chuck was used.

    I use mine as a final cclamping down deal. I clamp the part in a large iron DP vice and slide it around on the mag vice till I am under the drill point then hit the power button on the device and it locks the DP vice down very tight. I also included a degaussing switch to do that. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    .....

    Be careful when applying either DC or AC to a coil of wire. There MUST be iron in contact with the coil to absorb the flux created or the coil will cook and do so fast.....
    What you need in an AC coil to limit current, is "inductance". Many turns of fine wire on a small core, or fewer of heavier wire on a large coil.

    Inductance is not much help with DC. There, it takes resistance to limit current. BUT, you do need the core to focus a magnetic field to do things like mag drill bases, or relays and solenoids.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    With only limited experience building a magnetic broom for chip harvesting, I'll throw this in.
    DC on the coil lifts chips and hangs onto them. AC applied to the coil demagnetizes the core and drops the chips. That ends the magnetic portion of that brainfart. I will add operation requires IQ higher than that of the average shop sweeper and ability to follow directions as well.

    Be careful when applying either DC or AC to a coil of wire. There MUST be iron in contact with the coil to absorb the flux created or the coil will cook and do so fast. Flux can sufficiently heat mercury in a glass tube to use the Mercury as a timer of good accuracy. We did a lot of that before Mercury killed the planet and millions of kids showed up with heads 180° out of alignment. You could easily see it under mercury vapor lights called fluorescent lights.

    Now I'll return to pondering use of an ancient Mark IV air conditioner clutch as a magnetic drill anchor.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Some of my thoughts on this:

    DC would be better because AC would, at least potentially, introduce the possibility of introducing vibration at the AC frequency or twice that. This could have an effect on surface finish. Of course, that may not be a concern at a drill press as the inside of a drilled hole is not going to have a very nice finish anyway.

    Transformer Mass: I am not sure I can produce the equations off the top of my head, but generally speaking when a given amount of power is to be transformed, lower frequency transformers need to have more mass in their cores than high frequency ones. This is why aircraft originally did not use 50 or 60 Hz which are common on the power grids. Higher frequency allowed transformers and motors that had less mass in their cores. It is also much, if not all of the reason why switching power supplies are smaller, lighter, more efficient, and less expensive than the linear ones. The 50 or 60 HZ power line frequency requires larger, more massive transformers than the higher frequency switching supplies use. That higher frequency is often thousands or even tens of thousands of HZ.

    Now, this may not be as important in an application where the gripping power or magnetic field strength of the magnet is of prime importance. In fact, those larger, low frequency magnets may be able to support a larger magnetic field than a smaller, high frequency one would. And a DC magnet would definitely work.

    Resisting Shear or Rotational Forces: I would think about a thin layer of a substance with rubbery properties. This could be a painted on coating or a thin sheet attached with adhesive. This could greatly reduce an tendency to move sideways or rotate. Even a sheet of paper would help.

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  • danlb
    replied
    You could probably take a page from the surface grinder mag chucks. They often have a ledge up against the work that keeps it from moving in that direction. Dogs / fences are used in drill presses the same way, so a fence on the table may be all that's needed to keep the vise from moving, and a ledge on the top of the vise may keep the work from spinning.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Well, they do make magnetic chucks for lathes. Pretty expensive tho.

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