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  • quick nut.

    I was on my way to work the other day and in my rearview mirror i noticed the car behind me swerved to the right,then the left and then did a complete 360 degree and nearly rolled.I was shaking afterwards and thought to myself that the pr*ck was probably on his cellphone.
    Turns out that when I got to the job my ladder was gone and I put two and two together.I was the pr*ck and nearly killed this guy and possibly other people on the road. I can only be grateful it ended okay.

    I made this ladder lock shamelessly copied off the internet.But it takes too long too wind up and down to lock. I know I can cut it shorter but its designed for two ladders but its still irritating.How could I make a nut of sorts to speed this up.
    If you look at the black piece I have used a homebrew plastic dip to finish off the end pieces. Its real cool.You just heat up the metal and dip it in the liquid.My BIL gave me some.

  • #2
    Your setup will really lock a ladder in place but I find that using a rubber bungie works pretty well. You'd have to be going over some awfully rough road for the bungie to fail to hold the ladder in place.

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    • #3
      I live in Africa. The other day a guy jumped into the canopy of my pickup while I was at a robot.(traffic lights)and stole my extension cable. This I can at least lock.We even have a product most cars here have that is called smash and grab.
      Guys wait at the robots and break your window and steal your phone,bag laptop etc.

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      • #4
        why not use a locking pin of some sort, instead of the nut? you could put cross holes in the vertical rod in a few places, then it can be adjusted for however many ladders you are carrying.

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        • #5
          Better yet - why not move? sounds like everyday your skating bye with your life... not worth it...

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          • #6
            The general idea but with a multi-start thread would be quicker to spin down. Much less quick and dirty to put together of course.
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #7
              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
              Better yet - why not move? sounds like everyday your skating bye with your life... not worth it...
              Why not arm yourself. In S.A. aren't you allowed to defend yourself against robbers and car jackers?
              Hope you got your ladder back.

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              • #8
                You could buy/make one of these: http://sliponlocknut.com/
                McMaster calls them - Slip-On Twist-Close nuts.
                Not sure I would trust that not to vibrate loose.

                Or maybe make a long nut, cut down the middle lengthwise with a band saw, place on the threaded rod and hold in place with an old pair of vice grips and tack weld to each jaw. That would be fast and wouldn't vibrate loose.

                Steve
                Last edited by SteveF; 01-12-2020, 04:13 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by plunger View Post
                  I live in Africa. The other day a guy jumped into the canopy of my pickup while I was at a robot.(traffic lights)and stole my extension cable. This I can at least lock.We even have a product most cars here have that is called smash and grab.
                  Guys wait at the robots and break your window and steal your phone,bag laptop etc.
                  Can you have the side windows replaced with laminated glass? Many car owners in Kalifornia have done this to deter thieves. Apparently a dealer option out there.

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                  • #10
                    You could make something like the aftermarket upgraded depth stop nut on a Bridgeport type quill. Rather than the OEM knurled disc nuts that lock together and have to be spun down or up to position, it’s a single piece with a spring loaded button. The threads are on the spring loaded button only, so when it’s pushed in, they disengage from the threaded shaft and allow the quill stop to quickly slide to where you want it.

                    Example:

                    https://www.amazon.com/Morton-Standa...8763804&sr=8-3
                    Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                    9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                    • #11
                      He could rest the ladder on insulated pads and then pump high voltage to it --- like maybe a pre-charged Capacitor, not to hurt anyone - just stop their heart for maybe 5 or 10 minutes to give them a scare...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                        The general idea but with a multi-start thread would be quicker to spin down. Much less quick and dirty to put together of course.
                        Or at least a "faster" acme thread. Over here I found an industrial place that has acme all thread rod and nuts. Perhaps you can find a supply like that down your way?
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          You could make a split nut that opens so you can drop it until it contacts the cross piece, then close the nut and and screw it another turn or two if needed.

                          What came to mind is a piece of 1/4" plate about 3" long and width to match your bar. Two pieces of steel about 2.5" long, 5/8" square. A couple 10-32 bolts on the left end allow the nut to hinge apart (round the inner corner on a belt sander. Clamp the two 5/8" pieces together, drill and tap on the center split to fit your long bolt. Drill the 1/4" plate to clear your large bolt. The slot at the right end needs a rectangular piece to lock the nut closed; the hole shown has a 10-32 bolt to allow this piece to hinge out slightly so the nut can open. A pin through the half of the nut not shown will lock the threads onto the nut. If you make this rectangular piece a little longer a lock could be added to deter theft.
                          Last edited by GadgetBuilder; 01-11-2020, 03:34 PM.
                          Location: Newtown, CT USA

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                          • #14
                            There was an article about a quick nut that was basically a normal nut which was then put in a vice at a slight angle and milled. The result is a nut with threads on the upper right hand side and lower left hand side, but no threads on the upper left and lower right. When held at an angle it slides along the threaded shaft. When it gets to a flat surface the nut levels out and the threads engage. Once tightened the threads are locked in.

                            My cheap spring caliper has a similar design. Remove the tension from the nut and it will move easily. With tension the threads will engage and you can make precise adjustments.Click image for larger version

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                            This allow you to tighten it securely, but then remove it with only a few turns of the nut.

                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                            • #15
                              There was an article about a quick nut that was basically a normal nut which was then put in a vice at a slight angle and milled. The result is a nut with threads on the upper right hand side and lower left hand side, but no threads on the upper left and lower right. When held at an angle it slides along the threaded shaft. When it gets to a flat surface the nut levels out and the threads engage. Once tightened the threads are locked in.
                              Any chance of a link to that article, or maybe a photo or drawing..? If I'm picturing this right I'm guessing that the number of un-milled threads might be somewhat critical.
                              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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