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1904 Lineshaft Driven Toolroom

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  • 1904 Lineshaft Driven Toolroom

    Just now saw this on the Shorpy website...enjoy!

    https://www.shorpy.com/node/25314?si...iginal#caption

  • #2
    Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
    Just now saw this on the Shorpy website...enjoy!

    https://www.shorpy.com/node/25314?si...iginal#caption
    All those people making cash registers, hundreds probably, today its takes 25 on the line. I do see some goodies on their work tables I would like to have!

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    • #3
      Shorpy has some awesome pictures.
      You could spend endless says looking at them.

      -Doozer
      DZER

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      • #4
        Hey, I've got the next newer model of the Cincinnati horizontal in the lower center of the pic. Mine is geared internally for table travel but still has that external drive shaft as shown. Taking the table drive inside the column gives more feed speeds, selectable via levers on the other side but gives up one flat belt pulley speed since I've only got three. In a fit of modernizing, at some point it got an independent electric motor mounted above with a four speed gearbox (Whee), and a Bridgeport M-head on the overarm so I'm right up to date.
        .
        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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        • #5
          Ok Shorpy sleuths I see two what look like coffee pots on the two machines in the middle from the bottom up. Looks like more farther up as well. They look like they are floating in the air, no base they are sitting on. What are they, some kind of automatic drip oiler? Hot coffee with no visible means of support? Photo shopped in? Inquiring minds want to know

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          • #6
            Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post
            Ok Shorpy sleuths I see two what look like coffee pots on the two machines in the middle from the bottom up. Looks like more farther up as well. They look like they are floating in the air, no base they are sitting on. What are they, some kind of automatic drip oiler? Hot coffee with no visible means of support? Photo shopped in? Inquiring minds want to know
            Tallow?

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            • #7
              Very cool.

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              • #8
                ? this coffee pot?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post
                  Ok Shorpy sleuths I see two what look like coffee pots on the two machines in the middle from the bottom up. Looks like more farther up as well. They look like they are floating in the air, no base they are sitting on. What are they, some kind of automatic drip oiler? Hot coffee with no visible means of support? Photo shopped in? Inquiring minds want to know
                  That is a cutting oil pot for the horizontal mill.
                  Similar to: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Van-Norman-...cAAOSw7KhczKky
                  or

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                  • #10
                    The resolution in these old photos is amazing. If you are a fan of old shops you can see a lot of detail and get clues as to old processes and setups. The Huntington Library has a lot of photos of the Mount Wilson Observatory shop in digital form. Example:

                    https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/c...id/1310/rec/14

                    If you go on the "engineering tour" of the observatory you get to see the shop on the mountain, still mostly line shaft driven.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                      That is a cutting oil pot for the horizontal mill.
                      Similar to: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Van-Norman-...cAAOSw7KhczKky
                      or
                      Cool I have never seen one of those before. Kinda hoping it was coffee on demand.

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                      • #12
                        If I am looking in the right spot, where the arrow is pointing, it looks to be the glass globe of an old style electric light fixture. The item sitting on the side of the horizontal mill, right over the counter shaft, that looks like a coffee pot, is most likely a cutting oil supply.

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                        • #13
                          The green arrow is pointing to an electric arc light fixture. If the 1904 date is accurate the arc light is a fairly recent addition to the shop. NCR was doubtless generating their own electricity in the power house as municipal power was rare in 1904.

                          The number of windows and bench lights along with the age of the work force and lack of men wearing glasses are interesting too. In 1904 a worker would have apprenticed in at about 12 or 13 and done a 5 year indenture. The number of inspection stations adjacent to windows say whatever was made in that area had critical dimensions and was difficult to make. NCR had a reputation into the 60s of being very tightly regimented right down to the tool bags for every machine in the field and gawduglygreen cars with the cast aluminum door badges NCR service men drove. NCR quite probably educated a lot of machinists and watched them move to other less annoying jobs. In 1904 Job Hub was probably recruiters buying beer for NCR employees at bars near the plant.

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                          • #14
                            Wow, what detail. Are those heat treating kilns in back of the shaper on the right side of the photo?

                            Salem, Oregon

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                            • #15
                              How did they lubricate all those line shaft bearings?

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