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1904 Lineshaft Driven Toolroom

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  • Robg
    replied
    My great grandfather was a blacksmith in Stirling, Alberta and my dad told me he had the first line shaft setup in that neck of the woods at the time. This, I'm guessing, would be in the 1930's sometime. Sadly, there are no pictures that I'm aware of to document any of this. Apparently it was to run the trip hammer among other things. He had quite the colourful career and settled in that town for some unknown reason, probably because of the business opportunity as he was the only blacksmith around that area.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Flat belts, particularly leather belts stay on flat sheeves because the sheeve is crowned to keep the belt tracking. Maximal crown is found on old agricultural equipment such as a steam tractor powering a sawmill or thresher where perfect alignment is near impossible. In that situation long belt span between sheeves helps to compensate for misalignment. It's little different from aligning a belt conveyor.
    Among the important issues is squareness of the belt connecting ends. A couple degrees off will walk the belt off the sheeve.

    Figure 8 belts are direction reversers.. CW into the 8 at the driver delivers CCW at the driven or vice versa.
    There are a couple good books on flat belt drives and wood or iron sheeves and an abundance of halfazzed publications.

    Most leather belting has been replaced by rubber composite because rubber delivers superior life and few men who can schive leather right are still breathing. Forget finding a man who can sew a belt and will. Wood and iron sheeves are still made and in most sizes delivery can be had in a week.

    You want a funfilled day, line up a gravel screener driven by a Diesel engine thru a 1000-20 pneumatic tire driving a cast iron sheeve with flat belts from there out because they offer triple the service life of V belts in that service. A lot of flats still exist as vertical transport in grain elevators too with buckets riveted onto the belt.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    It's amazing those flat leather belts stay on the pulleys, especially the ones with the twist in them.
    At at that length those belts had to be flopping all over the place when they were running.
    I wonder how many belt companies went out of business when all that line drive stuff got phased out with electricity?

    JL...

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by Danl View Post
    And did you supply the Franz Bread, the Good Bread to the employees?
    NO. NCR went the meat pie route figuring the crust was sufficient the employees wouldn't need bread.

    I had to wait for 1932 for Wonder (the slop that built strong bodies 8 ways) to get built so my old man could get hired there shoveling coal into the boilers and work his way up to Chief Engineer of Rochester to start rolling sliced bread across the dock to waiting trucks. The cake shop oven was coke fired, and the Baker Perkins bread oven was oil fired. I started there at the age of 2 in the boiler room cooking bacon & eggs on a properly carboned coal scoop and moved up from there.. Shop was purely primitive even by standards of the time, but I was HAPPY to have work and bring a paycheck home.

    The stories I could relate would scare a man. Brown & serve rolls, a pure nightmare. Triple deck rolls I worked on the bandsaw that sliced those things and put 4 women roll catchers out to pasture. Times were tough though and I had to earn my keep.

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  • Danl
    replied
    And did you supply the Franz Bread, the Good Bread to the employees?

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by Danl View Post
    Shirley, Gwen was not working there then!
    They most certainly were. NCR cocntracted with Eastman DryPlate to determine if George was right about a well fed workforce producing more units at better quality. Shirley & Gwen went from Rochester to get the lunch idea off the ground at NCR.
    The kitchen and ovens were on the shop floor so workers could get the aroma as the pies baked unlike at Eastman Dry Plate where cooking grease screwed up prints.

    The girls stayed at Mrs Pringle's rooming house for ladies only.

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  • pinstripe
    replied
    It's a fantastic photo. I just noticed that there is a dividing head with tailstock at the base of the nearest mill.

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  • Danl
    replied
    Shirley, Gwen was not working there then!

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by Danl View Post
    Wow, what detail. Are those heat treating kilns in back of the shaper on the right side of the photo?
    No, that's Gwen and Shirley making meat pies for the boys lunches
    Gwen is on the left loading chopped meat into the shells and Shirley is loading the oven on the right.

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Oil can with a long hooked spout. Watch David Richards on youtube if you want to see.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    How did they lubricate all those line shaft bearings?

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  • Danl
    replied
    Wow, what detail. Are those heat treating kilns in back of the shaper on the right side of the photo?

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  • Franz©
    replied
    The green arrow is pointing to an electric arc light fixture. If the 1904 date is accurate the arc light is a fairly recent addition to the shop. NCR was doubtless generating their own electricity in the power house as municipal power was rare in 1904.

    The number of windows and bench lights along with the age of the work force and lack of men wearing glasses are interesting too. In 1904 a worker would have apprenticed in at about 12 or 13 and done a 5 year indenture. The number of inspection stations adjacent to windows say whatever was made in that area had critical dimensions and was difficult to make. NCR had a reputation into the 60s of being very tightly regimented right down to the tool bags for every machine in the field and gawduglygreen cars with the cast aluminum door badges NCR service men drove. NCR quite probably educated a lot of machinists and watched them move to other less annoying jobs. In 1904 Job Hub was probably recruiters buying beer for NCR employees at bars near the plant.

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  • Norm W
    replied
    If I am looking in the right spot, where the arrow is pointing, it looks to be the glass globe of an old style electric light fixture. The item sitting on the side of the horizontal mill, right over the counter shaft, that looks like a coffee pot, is most likely a cutting oil supply.

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  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

    That is a cutting oil pot for the horizontal mill.
    Similar to: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Van-Norman-...cAAOSw7KhczKky
    or
    Cool I have never seen one of those before. Kinda hoping it was coffee on demand.

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