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Unimat SL belt replacement

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  • Unimat SL belt replacement

    does anyone have a source for replacement belts for an old unimat SL? I just broke my last one and since they have been out of production for several decades I have no idea where to find anything to replace them
    Thanks in advanceGlenn.
    Glenn Bird

  • #2
    you can buy repurposed o rings at a big markup on ebay, or maybe google and find the sizes of O Rings and by them elsewhere. For small machines like that I just make my own from polyurethane. I keep lengths on hand so I can make whatever as needed. Don't buy the amazon crap though....I recently needed a size I didn't have. It its super stiff and would sap all the power - I had to return it. Any industrial supply place will sell it by the foot, or you can mail order from Cadence Supply who imo are quite good.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-15-2020, 04:17 PM.
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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    • #3
      When I first read the thread title I thought Hydromat.

      What is a Unimat?

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      • #4
        Years ago I bought, from Mcmaster-Carr, bags of the right size O-rings ...probably bags of 50, for the price of one belt from ebay sources. Come to think about it, maybe I had to cut down one of the larger size to make the smaller one. (They readily join back together with super glue.)

        Once I bought about 10 feet or so of the green (3 or 4 mm) belting, but I didn't have a lot of luck with melting and fusing the ends together for belts. When I'd get a neat, in line join the joint would fail, conversely seemed every good permanent joint would be out of line or crooked. I was having to melt and join free hand, using a hot putty knife blade to melt the ends.
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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        • #5
          Just sent you a PM woodenbird.
          Jim

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          • #6
            I have the original Unimat DB200, the one made with cast iron. But I believe the same belts fit the SL version which was made with aluminum castings. Besides, the motor/pulley casting was aluminum on both of them anyway and probably interchangeable. The OEM belts were O-ring style made with cheap rubber. They had two flats on them to be a better fit in the pulleys which had a Vee shaped groove, but ordinary, round O-rings work just fine. Those OEM belts were infamous for breaking after a month or three of use and I quickly got tired of paying the OEM price for them. As I said, ordinary, round O-rings work just fine and you can get them in MUCH better types of rubber (type) material. I bought N-Buna rings with a 70 hardness. They still stretch over the pulleys OK and I haven't broken a single one yet with years of usage. Their prices are reasonable at McMaster and I purchased packs of 25 or 50 from there for prices that are comparable to the sets of two or three belts on the web. That was at least 20 years ago, probably more and, as I said, no belt breakage yet so it is definitely a lifetime supply.

            http://www.mcmaster.com/


            The sizes I purchased for my DB-200 are:

            #331 for the smaller belt.

            #342 for the larger belt. It works but it is just a bit loose. I would suggest one size smaller or #341.

            I also purchased the #336 for the power feed pulley if you have that accessory.


            If you have the slow speed motor/pulley accessory, you need two of the small belt.
            Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 01-16-2020, 06:45 AM.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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            • #7
              I replaced mine with o rings and it works OK.
              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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              • #8
                Thanks Guys. I think I will try the O ring route first since several have had good results.
                Glenn Bird

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                • #9
                  Bented,
                  A unimat is a small jeweller type german/swiss made lathe. long since discontinued.
                  Glenn Bird

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by woodenbird View Post
                    Bented,
                    A unimat is a small jeweller type german/swiss made lathe. long since discontinued.
                    Thanks, I have never seen one.

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                    • #11
                      There are still places that make or sell parts for them.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                      • #12
                        What is a Unimat?

                        I think this requires a better description. I have had a Unimat SL with all of the attachments since about 1965 (https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/389865) and liked it so much I bought its big brother a, Maximat metal lathe, in 1969. The company that made these has an interesting history. First of all they are located in Austria, not Switzerland. Prior to WW-2 they manufactured large lathes and mills. At this time one of the things they made was a very compact combination metal lathe-milling machine for German submarines. Their plant was bombed out during the war. Having to start all over again from scratch, they began making the first Unimat, a 3" model maker's lathe with the money and equipment they could scrounge. The Unimat became so popular that it put them on their feet and the next step was to resurrect and market the combination submarine metal lathe-milling machine and sell it to hobbyists, research centers, etc. This was named the "Maximat" and was, and still is, a high quality combination lathe and mill. (https://www.google.com/search?q=maximat+lathe/milling+machine&client=firefox-b-1-d&sxsrf=ACYBGNT_HLfdNEl4kTzzn8mmjpJk7u6bdA:1579204 053026&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=YjdKWzE_IOI4s M%253A%252CztViBp3Fp1iXTM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRMPgMdYhdyWsuPpDPwFcw4wO-ZeA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj50O7E8YjnAhVP7qwKHXQcDqsQ9QEw C3oECAUQBg#imgrc=YjdKWzE_IOI4sM:) Eventually the company moved on to larger machines and no longer makes either the Unimat or the Maximat. But they still exist and produce excellent machine tools for the industrial market.

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                        • #13
                          First, it may be the size of a jeweler's lathe, but it is not that style. It is comparable to the Taig, Sherline, etc. It is a small,, 3" x 6" lathe that uses round rods for ways and has no compound. It also has a vertical column that allows it to be used as a drill press and milling machine. There are other accessories that convert it to things like a table saw, jig saw, grinder, flexible shaft tool, etc.

                          It is not German or Swiss made; it was made in Austria.



                          Originally posted by woodenbird View Post
                          Bented,
                          A unimat is a small jeweller type german/swiss made lathe. long since discontinued.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                            First, it may be the size of a jeweler's lathe,
                            what the heck is a jewelers lathe anyway? You ever seen a jeweler use a lathe? I've go lots of watchmakers lathes and know numerous uses for them in horology but a jewelers a lathe? I know there are specialty production ring lathes and buffer arbors get called lathes...but mostly when someone says a jewelers lathe it think its a misnomer for a small hobby lathe (which the unimat is) or maybe a watchmakers lathe (which the unimat is not).

                            Not bashing them, I've one (not the same one) since I was 12. Great little machines
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #15
                              I use o-rings on mine too. Red/orange ones.

                              Andy

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