Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ever trammed your drill press table?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ever trammed your drill press table?

    Dan the Chemist's thread about holes pulling off to one side brought this to mind. I'm sure that at some point in the dark past I checked my drill press table using a square. But that was before I knew about tramming with a swept indicator. Just wondering if anyone goes to that extent or not. I might have to brave the cold in the shop for 15 or 20 minutes today to try that.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

  • #2
    I sure have. If you have to drill a hole square you had better have your table square to the spindle axis.

    metalmagpie

    Comment


    • #3
      Oh, I did square it. Always do if for any reason I have to set up a tilt. Put a nice piece of 1/2" bar in the chuck and square to that. But I don't think I ever bothered to see if it's tilted front down or up. Or if the chuck is out by even a little it won't be truly square.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

      Comment


      • #4
        My drill press has a solid non tilting table.
        I always on the lookout for another non tilting table drill press.
        Since the machine is not a mill, then why bother with a tilting table that can get out of tram??

        Comment


        • #5
          The drill press in my metal shop at one time had to do double duty for both metal and wood. And more than a few times I had to drill into the end of a longer piece. And that's where the tilting table came in handy. I was able to rotate the table and head out so they overhung the bench it was on and with the table turned 90° I could clamp the long part in place and drill into the end of it.

          This could still be something I'd want to do on a metal part which was too big for the lathe and too long for the mill. And the drill press is still perched right on the corner of the present bench so it have the head and table turned to have the whole distance to the floor if needed.

          I guess if I didn't have a tilting table I could always still rotate the head around and use a big "L" plate clamped to the table with the vertical face out just past the edge. Then again I've found the ability to rotate the round table on my machine came in handy quite often too. Not a deal killer mind you but having the option made some things a touch easier.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

          Comment


          • #6
            The problem with using a DI to tram a drill press table is that most drill press tables, especially on import DPs, are not very flat. So, the DI readings will vary by a few thousanths as you sweep around, even at the best position of the table.

            But, yes I have done it.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #7
              I simply did the rod and square method, don't know what's to do if it wasn't square on the non-tilting axis anyway. I have a tilting rectangular table, but have never tilted it. Just yesterday I used the L plate method, but its a pain compared to the smaller round tables.
              Location: Jersey City NJ USA

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                The problem with using a DI to tram a drill press table is that most drill press tables, especially on import DPs, are not very flat. So, the DI readings will vary by a few thousanths as you sweep around, even at the best position of the table.

                But, yes I have done it.
                And the sloppy quill doesn't necessarily point to same direction every time depending on luck. Plus the cheap imports flex too much under drill thrust to make any sense of tramming to thousands.
                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  The problem with using a DI to tram a drill press table is that most drill press tables, especially on import DPs, are not very flat. So, the DI readings will vary by a few thousanths as you sweep around, even at the best position of the table.

                  But, yes I have done it.
                  That's as may be. But it would allow us to even out the worst of any runout. And for cases like mine where the table can rotate to confirm that the table and axis of rotation are square as well.

                  The mention of any play in the quill suggests that a bit of time to measure and evaluate all of the possible sources of error might be worthwhile. And for cases where we can't seem to drill a nice "square to the surface" hole in anything to save our lives there may be some ways to do minor corrections. For example I suspect there's some play in the socket where the head slides down over the column. Perhaps if just a slight adjustment to the "nod" of the head is needed to square up that axis with the table there's room for a couple of setscrews to provide said correction.

                  Or at the very least if we know how far out all this stuff is we'll know when to do the drilling in the press or if it needs to be more accurate to use the mill.

                  All in all I'm thinking that expanding from just tramming the table to an overall examination of all parts might be worth an hour or so even if it's just to better know when to use the mill and when it's OK to trust the drill press.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This Wadkin Industrial Wood Router Table is very accurate and sturdy,wasn't designed to be Drill Press but I'm very pleased with it. Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2277.PNG
Views:	437
Size:	3.04 MB
ID:	1849736

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      use a long arm on the indicator, will make it easier to get it better than a tenth
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        For a drill press, a straight piece of steel in the chuck and a square is perfectly sufficient. A quarter of a degree error in drilling is plenty for 99% of jobs, it might not be good enough for a mill, though.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I did it once and instantly gave up when I noticed the table would deflect .011 just from the lite quill pressure. So I use my Bridgeport as a drill press. Even if I ever get a newer big mill, I'll keep my BP as a drill press. Anything less seems like a sick joke.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I found that my old drill press was out, and through experimentation I found a spot in the rotation of the table where it came close- only out by 17 thou from front left to rear right. The stem was not perpendicular to the table, and the hole in the support was not parallel to the column. It just has its best position and that's that. The table won't fit on my lathe so I can't turn the stem- and it wouldn't solve the problem anyway. The newer drill press is closer.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I recently restored a older Clausing drill press, and ...yes I scraped the top of the table flat. I then scraped the mounting knuckle that mounts to the post just to get a good print thinking that being a quality US brand it was probably good and square. When I mounted everything up, the table was nowhere near square to the spindle. Luckily the table can be adjusted side side to side, but forth and aft, I had to put a shim in. I would have to pull the drill unit off...again.. of the post to get the knuckle off, and it is really square with that shim in, so leaving it for now...or ever.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X