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Abwood Milling Vise

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  • Abwood Milling Vise

    I was going to buy a used Kurt, but ran into this 6" Abwood at an estate sale for $75. Seems well made. Made in England. It does not look abused. Got the knee and table on my mill cleaned up. Getting there slowly.




    Last edited by junkaddict; 01-18-2020, 07:24 PM.

  • #2
    Well, that's the first dovetail vise I remember seeing! Nice! Looks like it's been well cared for.
    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
    Oregon, USA

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    • #3
      AWESOME SCORE,looks prestine and notched jaws as a BONUS!

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      • #4
        Nice..... That is stout enough and so low profile, that it almost seems closer to a shaper vise than a mill vise. Just the 2 screw base says "milling" to me.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #5
          I've got a couple of Abwoods for the Bridgeport, though I've gone over to a pair of Gerardis on the CNC.
          Good stout Vices (eng. splg.), but one thing to watch out for. If they've been over-tightened, then the casting where the bronze nut sits in the base can crack as it pushes against the casting.
          I've had to repair both of mine where they've been abused in the past.
          It's worth stripping it back to just to have a look and check it. it is a fairly easy repair though, just mill a section out, make up an insert block to screw in place, then bore it out for the nut to seat back in.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Abwood_6inch.jpeg
Views:	507
Size:	127.4 KB
ID:	1849857

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          • #6
            Good solid vices I use one on my mill, have the rotaating base for it too. Mine is a smaller model with square ways. The Abwood factory is only 6 miles away but they don't make this stuff any more, they specialise in grinding machines for solar panel wafers.
            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
            Monarch 10EE 1942

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Peter N View Post
              I've got a couple of Abwoods for the Bridgeport, though I've gone over to a pair of Gerardis on the CNC.
              Good stout Vices (eng. splg.), but one thing to watch out for. If they've been over-tightened, then the casting where the bronze nut sits in the base can crack as it pushes against the casting.
              I've had to repair both of mine where they've been abused in the past.
              It's worth stripping it back to just to have a look and check it. it is a fairly easy repair though, just mill a section out, make up an insert block to screw in place, then bore it out for the nut to seat back in.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	Abwood_6inch.jpeg
Views:	507
Size:	127.4 KB
ID:	1849857
              Nice fix, I will check that out on mine.

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              • #8
                The toolmakers at my old firm used Abwoods on their Bridgeports, they always gave the work a clout when tightening down.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Peter N View Post
                  I've got a couple of Abwoods for the Bridgeport, though I've gone over to a pair of Gerardis on the CNC.
                  Good stout Vices (eng. splg.), but one thing to watch out for. If they've been over-tightened, then the casting where the bronze nut sits in the base can crack as it pushes against the casting.
                  I've had to repair both of mine where they've been abused in the past.
                  It's worth stripping it back to just to have a look and check it. it is a fairly easy repair though, just mill a section out, make up an insert block to screw in place, then bore it out for the nut to seat back in.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Abwood_6inch.jpeg
Views:	507
Size:	127.4 KB
ID:	1849857
                  Took out the nut, and it's all good.

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                  • #10
                    It looks like a nice find. And the dovetail design along with the rather long movable jaw suggests that it can be snugged up to prevent or at least minimize the problem of jaw rise. Makes me want to ask if it has any kind of pull down mechanism like the Kurts or is the the dovetail and length of the jaw the extent of their tackling that problem?

                    I would be curious about any accuracy numbers. Bed flatness, fixed jaw, etc.?

                    But it is a nice find. And for $75, it definitely rates it so here it comes, YOU SUCK!
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                    • #11
                      WOW if I had a vise like that it would be the centerpiece on the dining room table instead of the mill table. Nice score!
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #12
                        No pull down mechanism. I'll take some measurements on it when I get a chance.

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                        • #13
                          Looks to be in great condition, fairly common in the U.K. and well a thought of tool. As far as lift if you have the dovetail adjusted correctly it will be minimum but depending on the job in hand we would often place a round bar between the work and the movable jaw to reduce the possibility and tap/hammer down the work after nipping it up
                          Knowledge withheld is knowledge lost

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by old mart View Post
                            The toolmakers at my old firm used Abwoods on their Bridgeports, they always gave the work a clout when tightening down.
                            SOP.
                            Standard Operating Procedure back in the day.
                            Or even today in my shop.
                            Abwood = great quality vises.

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