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Kearney & Trecker Milwaukee Model K No 3 follow me home.(pics)

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by outlawspeeder View Post
    As with all new ventures, I learn something new with every page I turn.

    Power Options:
    1. Phase-A-Matic

    https://www.ajaxtoolsupply.com/phstp...EaAk3WEALw_wcB

    2. 10Hp motor and kit

    http://phaseconverterusa.com/10Hp-Ro...vac-_p_54.html

    3. VFD
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Delta-VFD15...wAAOSwH9JdthuX


    1. Good; easy to use quick, $340 to $420 Bad 2/3 the power Notes, I don't think I'll ever need all the ponies

    2 Good I can get a motor for a good price The kit is $110, Bad I've never built one, Can I do it without screwing up. Notes I learn something new and I get full power

    3. Good Easy install Bad price $800 plus, most need 440 at 20hp Note Why does it have to be a 20hp for a 10hp motor?


    I go back to work and school tomorrow so the shop goes on hold so I can pay the bills. Not sure what way to go right now but I like #2 but #1 is the sensible one. Before reading all this I thought the VFD was the way to go till I was told I needed to double the HP rating. My shop only has 220 and most of the VFDs I looked at need 440...


    Bolting it down I'll skip that but may put mortar around the base. (easy to clean, & stops mice)

    CAT50 goes to show how much I am learning. I thought that was CAT50. Below is a pic of the draw bar. Two threads? "Fasttrack" Thanks again. I am learning.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200120_205247.jpg Views:	15 Size:	2.07 MB ID:	1850253
    I think the smaller thread is for holding 40 taper tooling,using a 50 to 40 reducer and Congrats on new machine,what size of table does it have?
    Last edited by Tundra Twin Track; 01-21-2020, 01:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    I have overloaded a Bridgeport type with work hanging off the side or on part of table. I could have tipped it with my hand, had to counterweight other end of table. And it was a piece I loaded on the mill by hand..
    I bet the #3 is rated at 4000 lbs plus, on the table , and not every job is centered.
    Last edited by 754; 01-21-2020, 06:14 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Yep I would take option 2. Wow I don't think I've ever seen tooling that big (she said)

    Leave a comment:


  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    As with all new ventures, I learn something new with every page I turn.

    Power Options:
    1. Phase-A-Matic

    https://www.ajaxtoolsupply.com/phstp...EaAk3WEALw_wcB

    2. 10Hp motor and kit

    http://phaseconverterusa.com/10Hp-Ro...vac-_p_54.html

    3. VFD
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Delta-VFD15...wAAOSwH9JdthuX


    1. Good; easy to use quick, $340 to $420 Bad 2/3 the power Notes, I don't think I'll ever need all the ponies

    2 Good I can get a motor for a good price The kit is $110, Bad I've never built one, Can I do it without screwing up. Notes I learn something new and I get full power

    3. Good Easy install Bad price $800 plus, most need 440 at 20hp Note Why does it have to be a 20hp for a 10hp motor?


    I go back to work and school tomorrow so the shop goes on hold so I can pay the bills. Not sure what way to go right now but I like #2 but #1 is the sensible one. Before reading all this I thought the VFD was the way to go till I was told I needed to double the HP rating. My shop only has 220 and most of the VFDs I looked at need 440...


    Bolting it down I'll skip that but may put mortar around the base. (easy to clean, & stops mice)

    CAT50 goes to show how much I am learning. I thought that was CAT50. Below is a pic of the draw bar. Two threads? "Fasttrack" Thanks again. I am learning.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20200120_205247.jpg
Views:	274
Size:	2.07 MB
ID:	1850253

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

    I mean, technically, you are correct. But, I have to ask, what the hell are you placing that is heavy enough to tip over a 7800lbs machine, sitting on the side of the table? I think you would have to worry about serious bending deflection at that point. Personally I wouldn't bother.
    I'm not, but I been around long enough to know eventually somebody will.
    I've come too close to wearing a #2 Cinci horizontal for a full body shirt already to believe such don't happen.

    That machine might be 7800#, but how is that weight distributed? The base is hollow. The table is heavy by itself and I've spent sufficient time telling people to crank the table all the way down before any attempt to move such toys to know the law of Mother Earth sucking will generally be ignored. Making stupid moves didn't get me this old.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    In response to the question of bolting the machine down; That little one should definitely have 2 anchors on the side opposite the table. The machine won't have much propensity to walk, but you want the anchors for the moment something heavy enough to change center of mass is placed on the table. There won't be a sufficient time window to change that Oh S#!T situation.

    I favor anchors that can be driven down and thru the floor for moving convenience when that day comes. Everything moves eventually.
    I mean, technically, you are correct. But, I have to ask, what the hell are you placing that is heavy enough to tip over a 7800lbs machine, sitting on the side of the table? I think you would have to worry about serious bending deflection at that point. Personally I wouldn't bother.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    In response to the question of bolting the machine down; That little one should definitely have 2 anchors on the side opposite the table. The machine won't have much propensity to walk, but you want the anchors for the moment something heavy enough to change center of mass is placed on the table. There won't be a sufficient time window to change that Oh S#!T situation.

    I favor anchors that can be driven down and thru the floor for moving convenience when that day comes. Everything moves eventually.

    Leave a comment:


  • SVS
    replied
    A few pointers-
    instead of “shafts” try horizontal milling arbor. Available in A or B styles. I forget which is which, but one style has an un-threaded reduced diameter end designed to run in the small hole arbor support. This support is only used at the end of such an arbor.

    It’s easy to set up a 1” longer drawbar with a draw nut to use cat 50 and nmtb interchangeably. One of the spindle drive keys will have to be thinned or removed for cat 50 arbors.

    clear as mud?

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    I could do a chapter on War Production including a Plymouth locomotive that almost became my lawn ornament back in 72.

    War machines all had brass serial number tags when they left the builder assigning the agency they were built for. Women labored around the clock in DC tracking the machines in ledgers in ink and according to manuals any machine could be tracked to where it sat. Industry saw it differently, many of those machines became barter material. Oddly, within a week after VJ Day, largely to cut payroll most of those women were terminated from Government employment and only some of the ledgers were boxed up and retained. Most War machines ceased to exist on paper. I personally know of 70+ Mack dump trucks that became privately owned trucks on Christmas Eve in exchange for a pickup load of meat, and I stood beside the grave of the man who made it happen. I've also run a fine lathe with a brass tag that appeared in a yard under a tarp one night. Millions of tons of steel changed hands leaving no record. Mortgages on land and buildings used in War Production vaporized as production agencies were closed down and holders in possession became land and building owners. Boxcars, mostly wood, got paint jobs and renumbered often changing which RR owned them for convenience. Nobody was being paid to watch, and nobody was looking. Guard shacks were empty and gates weren't locked, and manufacturers whose names would shock you were getting their last bite of the pie.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    NMTB taper.
    That's a good point. Outlawspeeder, ordinary CAT 50 tooling might need some minor tweaks to work in your machine. If this mill still has it's original length drawbar, you'll need to make some adapters or a new drawbar to use CAT 50 tooling. The CAT 50 tooling is designed for pull studs instead of a drawbar and their tails are shorter than NMTB 50 taper tools. Otherwise, the taper itself is identical.

    At the very least, I think I have a CAT50 to MT3 adapter with a Jacobs 14N mounted on it that I can part with. I'll take a look and see what else I might have lying around.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    NMTB taper.

    Leave a comment:


  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

    By the way, how are you doing for CAT 50 tooling? Is this your first machine with a CAT 50 taper? You're in the Saint Louis area, right? I may be passing through there in a couple of months and I might have a few minor things to donate to the cause. I love to see these old beasts being used!
    It came with two shafts, and I had one with a 3/4 opening. and Yes I would be proud to put them to work. Thank You

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    I've seen a fair few large (like 25hp) VFDs sell of govdeals fairly cheap, usually packaged with some crap. The cheap ebay ones will probably get you up and running as well, but I agree a RPC would be the way to go. In rush current is of no significance as you set the ramp time slow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by outlawspeeder View Post
    So what I got was a 10HP, 3 over arm support, 2 50CAT shafts 1" and 1.25, some cutters, and a vise that looks like a toy on that big machine. One handle is broken off, and one handle is missing the bolt that keeps it in place.
    By the way, how are you doing for CAT 50 tooling? Is this your first machine with a CAT 50 taper? You're in the Saint Louis area, right? I may be passing through there in a couple of months and I might have a few minor things to donate to the cause. I love to see these old beasts being used!

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel
    replied
    I just used a static converter on my Cincinnati 2MH. It was cheap and got me up and running quickly. With so much power available, the loss was not a problem.
    Otherwise, look for a good deal on a surplus motor you can use for an RPC as previously suggested.
    You can really chew off material with such a beast. You need the right cutters though.

    Added - No, you almost surely do not need to bolt it down.
    Last edited by Joel; 01-20-2020, 02:02 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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