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Kearney & Trecker Milwaukee Model K No 3 follow me home.(pics)

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    I can remember when one of the local machine shops would boil engine blocks in some type of solvent. When they came out they were bright and clean.
    I'm not sure what the temp. / boiling point of the solvent was but I'm sure the motor well exceeds the solvent temp. when it's been running.
    I find it hard to believe that boiling temperatures would cause any distortion to machine parts. As long as the boiling temperature is only a couple hundred degrees.

    What was the yellow paint you used on the other parts??

    JL.............

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  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    The paint is ESSS Gray. Very light gray.
    https://ca.ppgrefinish.com/getmedia/...2019-Final.pdf

    A lot of cleaning. I heard of cooking the oil out of the cast but didn't want to screw up any parts of this mill. Parts are kind of hard to come by. Then a epoxy primer and then two coats of ESSS. I had to do some touch ups due to the oil in the cast.

    Of course taking the paint off I found some old repairs. I don't think it ever fell over but I think someone backed into with something like a fork lift or something heavy came off the table... I did a little bit of smoothing but the scratches are from 1943.

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    War Finish was to get these machines into the war production quicker. The shaping of the casting were left rough, removing only what was needed. No filler in the voids. This had two coats of paints. The outer coat washed off in the part cleaner and was mostly a repaint at some point. Very poor job and not covering a lot. The base coat stay on where it could. I've found if the base coat is not falling off it is best to leave it and primer on top of it.



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    One of the reasons I am glad I pulled it apart. This is the drive tube for the table and hold a spindled shaft move the table.
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  • SVS
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    This is the War Board tag on my “Universal” horizontal boring mill-

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by SVS View Post
    During the war time and materials were critical so manufacturers did minimal filling and paint work due to orders from the “war production board”.

    Was a disclaimer/ apology on finish quality, and an assurance the base machine was as good as ever.
    That's what I figured. I guess they were ashamed enough that they had to put the apology in raised letters in the casting. I'm aware of the corners that were cut during the war. Steel pennies because copper was in demand for bullet jackets, silver nickles because nickel was in demand etc.

    I've seen a lot of war time machines but never one marked as such.

    I have an anvil that came off a battle ship. It has a raised anchor cast into the side and bolt flanges on the bottom.

    JL...........
    Last edited by JoeLee; 08-09-2021, 10:47 PM.

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  • SVS
    replied
    During the war time and materials were critical so manufacturers did minimal filling and paint work due to orders from the “war production board”.

    Was a disclaimer/ apology on finish quality, and an assurance the base machine was as good as ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    Yea, good score for sure. What is "War Finish" ??

    JL...............

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  • SVS
    replied
    Looks like a well done job. Must have those mice trained to clean up and put tools away.

    Apron looks white in some shots? Maybe just the lighting?

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  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    The reason the wicks are wet is I wanted to test dddd
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  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    Just some tool porn as I put the K & T back together.

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    Saddle back on with all new wicks and pipe cleaners. Yup, I used both. I figure they are in oil and will not rust and if the next guy 80years from
    now wants to pull the wicks out and replace them I will not care... But if I had to pull them out for some unknow reason the pipe cleaners help.
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    The front gearbox in far enough for the the two bolts to take over.

    The felts in the gearbox are wet with oil. Oil lines feed the two trays and the wicks take the oil to gears and other trays. In turn those trays drip
    on other gears. see next post.

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  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
    Don't want to get in the middle of this electrical pissing match, but I want to bring up something that may or may not be relevant to the electrics used in this machine. Years ago, I ran a K-T that was probably twenty years newer and a bit bigger (60' table). On it, when you changed the speed dial (the dial with the crank on the side of the machine) this caused the motor to "pulse" to gently roll over the gear train so the desired speed gears would mesh. I remember once, when the pulse feature quit working, it would not change speeds until the electricians repaired it. I don't know if this applies to your machine or not, just thought I would bring it up.
    Good luck with your new machine.
    Sarge41


    No it is not a factor. This thing was made in 1943.



    On other point I have a line on a Phase-A-Matic for a good price to get me up and running. The Auction site I go though just sold their last 10HP motor but are on a look out for me.

    This weekend I plan on getting it cleaned up and cleaned out. I downloaded the pdfs so I need to do some reading and figure out what oil goes in the table, body and base. Yes, it has three. I also found out that cleaning the drains and paths back to the base is something I should do before putting it into use.


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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

    As soon as the EE explains his. Never have seen one with a flywheel, Often the idler motor shaft is cur off, even on commercially made units.
    How large in diameter, how much mass would the flywheel have to be to add a measurable effect. Must be a valid reason why it isn't done.
    Play devil's advocate elsewhere.
    https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...-and-flywheels

    To avoid a lot of OT crap here

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    Don't want to get in the middle of this electrical pissing match, but I want to bring up something that may or may not be relevant to the electrics used in this machine. Years ago, I ran a K-T that was probably twenty years newer and a bit bigger (60' table). On it, when you changed the speed dial (the dial with the crank on the side of the machine) this caused the motor to "pulse" to gently roll over the gear train so the desired speed gears would mesh. I remember once, when the pulse feature quit working, it would not change speeds until the electricians repaired it. I don't know if this applies to your machine or not, just thought I would bring it up.
    Good luck with your new machine.
    Sarge41

    Leave a comment:


  • Ringo
    replied
    We need pictures of the mill.
    enough of the wiring power supply.
    enough bickering about power, and phase, and so forth
    you are bickering over semantics
    Enough

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    Explain your physics to me please.
    -D
    As soon as the EE explains his. Never have seen one with a flywheel, Often the idler motor shaft is cur off, even on commercially made units.
    How large in diameter, how much mass would the flywheel have to be to add a measurable effect. Must be a valid reason why it isn't done.
    Play devil's advocate elsewhere.
    Last edited by reggie_obe; 01-22-2020, 08:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

    It doesn't work like that. Even big shops that might be running a 100hp RPC won't have a flywheel on the idler. Not true for motor-generators or rotary converters either.
    Explain your physics to me please.
    -D

    Leave a comment:

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