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Wanted Some Dedicated ER Collet Chuck Wrenches - (Yes, there are pictures)

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  • #16
    Originally posted by DICKEYBIRD View Post
    Thanks, I'll try slowing the plunge feed down 1st and try a test cut to see how it goes. The other thing is that I think a 6mm 3 flute is a bit too big for slotting with the Sherline. I got a couple 4mm 3 flute coated carbides to try. These are metric drawings I'm working with & am having to learn what feeds & speeds fit in the Sherline's very narrow comfort zone.
    I've never actually seen a Sherline in person, but I get the feel from, images and videos its a pretty light weight machine like the basic Taig. Remember slotting ability is a function of the machine rigidity, the available horsepower, and the deflection of the mill itself. Even if the machine can do it, the mill might not be able to take it.

    FYI: The FS Wizard ap can be set to metric or imperial measurement for calculating feeds and speeds. Its geared more towards industrial machines, but it can help you find starting points for lighter machines. It does assume you are using "best" supplemental practices and a rigid machine so you have to adjust. Look at all the data it provides before using it though. It doesn't help if it says you can do it, but the horsepower requirements are 22.5. LOL. Adjust.

    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #17
      Bob, I see from the FB group that you are profile cutting with a 1/4" carbide end mill running 2500 RPM and 19 IPM. What kind of step downs are you taking with that cut?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by polaraligned View Post
        Bob, I see from the FB group that you are profile cutting with a 1/4" carbide end mill running 2500 RPM and 19 IPM. What kind of step downs are you taking with that cut?
        That was DOC 0.0905 inches and 100% WOC. Interestingly when I double checked the FS software later it said I was supposed to be running at 3600 RPM. I had entered 2500 by mistake. . When I had to cut anther pair of wrenches (different size) I used the same 2500 RPM. The mill still looks quite good. Its a 4 flute ALTiN coated Accupro. Not an expensive mill. There are a couple video clips on Makers & Builders if you want to hear what the cut sounds like. I forget what the plunge feed rate was, but if you plan to duplicate the cut I can look it up for you later. I'm so happy with the cut I think I am going to save it to my style library for that machine in my cam software with a name like 1/4 SE Slot 4140HT. I did run a pretty healthy air blast to clear the chips.

        I found this to be a very satisfying project if on the face of it fairly simple.
        Attached Files
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #19
          Thanks Bob. I put the numbers into Gwizard (because the 19 ipm seemed fast), and it says 4100 rpm @ 11.6 ipm to keep the cutter deflection below 0.001". For 2500 rpm, the recommended feed drops all the way down to 7 IPM. At 2500 RPM and 19 IPM, the cutter deflection is nearly triple the "recommended" value. This is assuming a small 1" stickout of the mill and annealed material.

          I looked at the videos and they look and sound good, so if the cutters aren't breaking, and it is cutting clean, I guess stick with it.

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          • #20
            … and the wrenches come out pretty good with a .01 cleanup pass. It may also be a function of horsepower. That KMB1 has a 4 pole 5HP Leland motor pushing the spindle with a 1:1 cog belt drive. On cuts like this I always choke up on the end mill as far as I can. Its probably only sticking out 5/8".

            The wrenches are for TTS tooling for the Tormach, but they were cut on the KMB1.

            Plunge was 3.83IPM

            Here is a screen shot of the roughing profile parameters:
            Click image for larger version  Name:	TTS Screenshot.png Views:	0 Size:	136.7 KB ID:	1851132


            P.S. I appreciate the amount of work he has done on his software rental business, but I'm not a big fan of Mr Warfield. I have been using HSM adviser and FS Wizard from Eldar Gerfanov (zerodivide on cnczone) for quite some time. HSM/FS is more geared towards heavy industrial machines and assumes you are using best practices, but it gets me there pretty consistently. I have built up machine profiles within HSM adviser on all my different CNC machines, so the results are based in part on the capabilities of the machine. Like I said in my previous message 2500 was a mistake, but it worked, and quite well. It surprised me too, so I asked about it on PM, and the one response basically said, "Meh, Its within the range that should work."

            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

            Comment


            • #21
              *** removed ***
              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
                … and the wrenches come out pretty good with a .01 cleanup pass. It may also be a function of horsepower. That KMB1 has a 4 pole 5HP Leland motor pushing the spindle with a 1:1 cog belt drive. On cuts like this I always choke up on the end mill as far as I can. Its probably only sticking out 5/8".
                I assume the Hurco originally had a varidrive in it like a BP? I have debated doing something like this to my BP, but the best way to do it is to cut the top of the spindle (splined portion) down because that slaps all over the place. I have seen pictures of others who have done it, but a lot of work. If you are only using modern coated carbide, you really don't need the low end of the BP. I would also want to be able to run it up to at least 5K rpm, which is not a problem for short periods of time.

                Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post

                P.S. I appreciate the amount of work he has done on his software rental business, but I'm not a big fan of Mr Warfield. I have been using HSM adviser and FS Wizard from Eldar Gerfanov (zerodivide on cnczone) for quite some time. HSM/FS is more geared towards heavy industrial machines and assumes you are using best practices, but it gets me there pretty consistently. I have built up machine profiles within HSM adviser on all my different CNC machines, so the results are based in part on the capabilities of the machine. Like I said in my previous message 2500 was a mistake, but it worked, and quite well. It surprised me too, so I asked about it on PM, and the one response basically said, "Meh, Its within the range that should work."
                I downloaded HSM adviser to see how the numbers compared to Gwizard, and they are nearly the same. Choking up on that bit really changed the feed/speed numbers close to what you had. It looked longer than 5/8 in the picture so I guessed at 1". I paid like $25 for a perpetual license for Gwizard years ago, so no need to spend $100 on another calculator. If you stay within the manufacturers sfm and chipload, you are ok.

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                • #23
                  I was expecting something fancier since my ER-32 nut uses one of these below, plus a simple "tuning fork" wrench for the body I made of 1/2" 6061. Still cool work! I'd have to use a rotary table or build a jig on a piece of big hex stock to make that, and it would be slow.
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	lk76f1w34_5810604.jpg Views:	0 Size:	6.6 KB ID:	1851494
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by polaraligned View Post
                    I assume the Hurco originally had a varidrive in it like a BP?
                    As far as I know its always had a 1:1 timing belt.

                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                    Comment

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