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  • Tool Identification ideas

    Anybody have any idea what this is or who made it? Inquiring minds on 'Progress if fine, but its gone on for too long' blog. Which is here by the way, some interesting stuff. http://progress-is-fine.blogspot.com/
    Attached Files

  • #2
    I would wager that its either a wood chisel or somebody's custom scraper. The engraving strikes me as vaguely familiar tho, if I can remember why it would definitely help.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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    • #3
      Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
      I would wager that its either a wood chisel or somebody's custom scraper. The engraving strikes me as vaguely familiar tho, if I can remember why it would definitely help.
      Its factory made and I can't make out the maker, although it does end in "& Sons". Its kinda odd looking for a chisel with that weird turnout part on the metal end almost like something to hammer on?
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Maybe a straight handled froe?
        .
        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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        • #5
          Is there any kind of "friend or froe" identification.
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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          • #6
            Just wanted to re-post this absolute classic from the same site: http://progress-is-fine.blogspot.com...nch-sizes.html

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
              Just wanted to re-post this absolute classic from the same site: http://progress-is-fine.blogspot.com...nch-sizes.html
              Yes a very informative post about the British bolt system but after working with the British system for many years I can answer the question this way. An experienced mechanic can glance at a US system bolt head or nut and know the size wrench it takes, that cannot be said for the British system. Not to mention all the nomenclature on the damn Brit wrenches Now I prefer vise grips....

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              • #8
                Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

                Yes a very informative post about the British bolt system but after working with the British system for many years I can answer the question this way. An experienced mechanic can glance at a US system bolt head or nut and know the size wrench it takes, that cannot be said for the British system. Not to mention all the nomenclature on the damn Brit wrenches Now I prefer vise grips....
                Yes, I have little or no experience with the British system but the article was *extremely* informative and entertaining. I am fortunate that I do have a full set of taps and dies for British threads, including the old hand-held thread chasers. In my day-to-day job as a millwright/mechanic/welder/machinist, I depend on being able to identify wrench sizes immediately at a glance, and repair/install whatever without having to launch an inquisition.
                Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 01-22-2020, 01:03 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                  Yes, I have little or no experience with the British system but the article was *extremely* informative and entertaining. I am fortunate that I do have a full set of taps and dies for British threads, including the old hand-held thread chasers. In my day-to-day job as a millwright/mechanic/welder/machinist, I depend on being able to identify wrench sizes immediately at a glance, and repair/install whatever without having to launch an inquisition.
                  Agreed! I must lament being in business where you were faced with the British systems, the metric system and the US system was to say the least expensive. Taps, dies, tools, Helicoils, and the endless stock of nuts, bolts, etc was quite the pain in the ass. I think that very informative post about the British system shows that in reality all these different screw drive systems, and the unbelievable array of fastener sizes the world over is usually just about the money for the inventor. I mean how many wood screw drives do we really need? Apparently thousands:/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

                    Its factory made and I can't make out the maker, although it does end in "& Sons". Its kinda odd looking for a chisel with that weird turnout part on the metal end almost like something to hammer on?
                    Could be WM marples&sons. Or some other numerous "something&sons"

                    Bevels look peculiar to be just "normal" chisel, maybe this is for some special application. edit: splitting "knife"? some timber framing tool?
                    Last edited by MattiJ; 01-22-2020, 04:44 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Oh, I didn't mean to derail your topic, I just loved that website. I think the issue with screws and fasteners is like evolution, its not really a competing thing. I think its more like just trying to find the best way to do it. And then there are special requirements, odd situations, etc. etc. I was fortunate on the job, that they had mostly standardized before I was there, but there were still the few oddballs that nobody had dealt with yet. For example, one furnace (designed and built in Germany) had a vacuum quench. The pump failed one day while the furnace was loaded. Little did I know the Germans had used a BSP thread on it instead of NPT....

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                      • #12
                        While Whitworth invented the worlds first standards for thread systems, it has not been used in the UK for over fifty years.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by old mart View Post
                          While Whitworth invented the worlds first standards for thread systems, it has not been used in the UK for over fifty years.
                          While it's probably true that it's no longer used in mainstream manufacturing, there's no telling what small companies and individuals will do. I had a late 60's BSA motorcycle with some Whitworth fasteners. I still have the wrenches.
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                          • #14
                            Nickel-city-fab
                            Great Link !- Enjoyed it immensely
                            I would like to point out a very important point as some of the comments may be mis-leading
                            The early "standards " - Whitworth and Sellers---were for Thread Form Only.
                            55 degrees and 60 degrees
                            Threads Per Inch (TPI) or Pitch was NOT standardized then as most manufacturers made their own taps and dies.
                            Standard Pitches per diameter and Hex Head sizes in the USA came in early 1900's ( 1906 I believe )

                            Rich

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by old mart View Post
                              While Whitworth invented the worlds first standards for thread systems, it has not been used in the UK for over fifty years.
                              Not quite, I was a Triumph motorcycle dealer up till 1981, still plenty of the British system on those bikes. So that makes it 39 years Anyone needing wrenches or sockets let me know

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