Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hydraulic Lift Table..... Any One Ever Make One ?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hydraulic Lift Table..... Any One Ever Make One ?

    I've been thinking of getting one for quite some time. Problem is I can't find one within practical driving distance or for a decent price. Shipping prices are crazy and most sellers don't want to ship.
    So, I have been tossing around some ideas about making one. 2' x 3' table with four posts would be my preference.
    The local fab shop could shear and bend the plate for me and I could buy one of those long hydraulic jacks locally at Horrible Freight. I have some 2" sq. tube for the posts and casters are easy to come by.

    Since I've never really paid close attention to these when I've seen one I have a few questions.

    What would be a good thickness for the top and bottom? I was thinking either 3/16" or 1/4" with some bracing or ribs welded to the underside.

    What do they use for the sliding posts? telescopic tube? metal to metal or is the larger tube sleeved on the inside with a plastic bushing of some kind. My concern here is binding of the posts when raising or lowering especially if the load isn't centered.

    JL...................

  • #2
    Check out this video from This Old Tony:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GHyuiTF1G4&t=0s

    Ted

    Comment


    • #3
      you can also make one like the "motorcycle" lift tables... single ram, scissor style. I made some parts for one that was for lifting helicopters.

      At work we have adjustable height tables, both 2 and 4 ram types. These are for light work, but the cylinders expand about 15 inches, and have a hand crank or tiny electrical drive for the same.
      Last edited by lakeside53; 01-22-2020, 02:20 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        My workbench/welding table is a homemade lift. I wanted to be able to sit or stand and work comfortably as well as work on 'taller' objects. It has four telescoping legs but has only 14" lift, which is perfect for what I wanted. It is operated by four ACME jackscrews which are driven by either an electric motor or hand crank. They are connected through a chain/sprocket setup. Mine is 4' X 8', 1/2" steel top and weighs an even 1,000lbs including the little 9" South Bend on one end. I've sat two or three people on it in addition to the lathe and it lifts no problem. It cost me $1000, but at the size you want it would be much cheaper. I like not having to pump hydraulics.
        Southwest Utah

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
          The local fab shop could shear and bend the plate for me and I could buy one of those long hydraulic jacks locally at Horrible Freight.
          JL...................

          Why not just buy the table at HF?


          https://www.harborfreight.com/500-lb...art-61405.html

          Comment


          • #6
            A few months ago I purchased the 1000 lb model from Harbor Freight in Utah and couldn't be happier. It is probably the best $262+tax I've ever spent. If you have one of these stores near you I suggest you stop in and check out the lifts. I've needed one for years but never got around to buying or making one. That being said I would never have 1000 lbs on one, probably the most would be 500 to 600 at any given time. Unless I needed a special size or other special features I'd never make one either since you can get a decent 1000 lb lift for cheap.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
              you can also make one like the "motorcycle" lift tables... single ram, scissor style. I made some parts for one that was for lifting helicopters.

              At work we have adjustable height tables, both 2 and 4 ram types. These are for light work, but the cylinders expand about 15 inches, and have a hand crank or tiny electrical drive for the same.
              I never cared for the scissor type lifts, especially for the lift table. I could use the bottom for storage with the post type.
              Doubtful that I wold ever put 1000 Lbs on it. 15" of travel would be plenty for matching heights of my work benches or mill table.

              My main questions were on what to use for sq. tube and any binding issues.

              JL................

              Comment


              • #8
                I bought a scissor type lift from a now deceased friend. Apparently it. and many others like it were used in General Motors plants to lift dies to appropriate heights to slide them into presses; The nameplate indicates a safe load of 1500 lbs, the ram is about 2 inches diameter.The platform is 5 feet long about 2 feet wide and it has 3 foot beaver tails at both ends which touch the ground when it is dropped fully. It has a 120 volt motor/ pump unit. It is on small castors so can be moved, however they have dug into my driveway and it is in a semi permanent position.
                I can drive my 2" and 3" scale model traction engines on to the platform and then raise them to convenient working heights.
                It is an essential part of the equipment I use to run my models.
                Hope this is encouraging. Regards David Powell.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Like David Powell mentioned, I have a friend who picked up a B600 lift for 500 bucks at a plant auction
                  https://prestolifts.com/products/sta...ive-power-lift

                  I have a Big Joe ( 1,000#) and a Blue Giant version( 1500#) that were scrapped by companies , but I repaired them.
                  The Blue Giant can pick up my Bridgeport. Both are electric/hydralic
                  Rich
                  Green Bay, WI

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                    I never cared for the scissor type lifts, especially for the lift table. I could use the bottom for storage with the post type.
                    Doubtful that I wold ever put 1000 Lbs on it. 15" of travel would be plenty for matching heights of my work benches or mill table.

                    My main questions were on what to use for sq. tube and any binding issues.

                    JL................
                    They sell "telescoping tubing" that is designed for this kind of application, but it's definitely more expensive than standard structural tubing. Depending on the size you choose and how much effort you want to go to making a tool that you can suck through the tube to clean off the weld seam, you could probably make standard structural tubing work. It's more complicated, but you could also think about fabricating some kind of sliding element. I'm thinking of an assembly that has several ball bearings that act as wheels and track along the outside of a tube or maybe inside of a piece of channel - something like that. Gives you more "tunability" and maybe smoother action.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've thought about modifying the guts of an old trash compactor.
                      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                      Lewis Grizzard

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is not homebuilt but one I got at Auction,it's pretty sturdy. Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2327.PNG
Views:	250
Size:	3.07 MB
ID:	1850608Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2328.PNG
Views:	243
Size:	3.43 MB
ID:	1850609

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          TTT, I have no idea what you paid for that, but I think it qualifies for...


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                            I never cared for the scissor type lifts, especially for the lift table. I could use the bottom for storage with the post type.
                            Doubtful that I wold ever put 1000 Lbs on it. 15" of travel would be plenty for matching heights of my work benches or mill table.

                            My main questions were on what to use for sq. tube and any binding issues.

                            JL................
                            you can buy 2 inch square tube that will slide. It's used for trailer hitches. If not, you have to deal with the welded seam and the asymmetry of the "square" corners. Often for short lengths easier to make your own - 4 pieces 3/8 plate milled to your dimensions, SHCS to join. No "corner" issues.


                            I have what is referred to as die cart. It has a 30x36 inch piece of 3/4 plate on the forks. Any height I want from 3 inches to 55 inches. One ram.
                            Last edited by lakeside53; 01-22-2020, 09:23 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The older I get the more I appreciate my 600# Jet lift cart. Every gray ponytail type should have one. I paid $250 for mine about 15 years ago. Someone dropping off a heavy item in a pickup? Match height, slide it on, lower, roll. Awesome.

                              We regularly remove the back seat from our Chevy Express to set it up for car camping. That seat isn't terribly heavy but it's awkward for a couple in our sixties. With the lift cart, it's an easy job.

                              I've looked at those post tables. I can see how they go up and down with the ability to lift heavy things. But they don't roll easily. I'm sticking with my lift cart. All I've ever had to do with it is tighten a few bolts and change the hydraulic fluid.

                              metalmagpie

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X