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OT: Wood - No Tear Countersink

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  • #16
    I like the wonky bookcase.
    Anyway the OP is interesting if I can just remember to cut the ring with the brad point before I've lost the centre by drilling the actual hole. I can see it being a good ruse before using a regular countersink to stop the tearout. Us on here should be able to knock up Gellflex's idea fairly easily for the common sizes........

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    • #17
      I've always tried to hide fasteners in any of the "nice" woodwork I've done. But it's a good trick to remember and I can see it's merits. Thanks for sharing.

      And 6270, that's some nice work there. I love that little safe with the working lock, great job. I look forward to the day that I can get back to my first love of woodworking to make heirloom stuff like that for my kids and future grand kids. My FIL is quite an accomplished woodworker, and he is constantly making something for his 3 grand kids. He's building a bunkbud for my son right now out of padauk. He made a pull out day bed and matching corner cabinet for my daughter out of it last year, and my MIL has said this is the last time he's working with it as the orange dust gets everywhere in their house (basement shop).

      It's almost a shame that this forum is so "machinist" centered (I get that it's the home shop "machinist" forum.....), as there is a great group of members here that are very talented in a variety of different and parallel to machining disciplines. Would be nice to have possibly another sub forum to share building projects, that may not be so machining related, but be similar enough that the membership might find interesting enough to follow along. It's a great community here, but it's much like an iceberg in terms of talent and craftsmanship, and much of the work everybody does is below the surface unshared as it's just outside the rigid definition of "machine work".

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      • #18
        Originally posted by lynnl View Post
        Wow! Nice work there 6270!
        Too bad you got those shelves a little crooked. Misplace your ruler did you...? Also the sides are awfully crooked. Keep working on it though ...you'll soon get it right.
        That is the way the customer (City Library) wanted it - something about some Doctor's birthday.

        I put the little blue cabinet on the top just for fun. Yes, the drawer works. I wanted the Librarian to be able to open it - just in case some of the kids asked what was in there.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

          snip . . .

          And 6270, that's some nice work there. I love that little safe with the working lock, great job.

          . . . snip
          I have this "thing" about safes - and woodworking - so . . . . . why not?

          I want to be careful and not turn this into a woodworking forum. There are plenty of those out there. I spend a bunch of time there, but I discovered this place when I need to learn how to use my lathe to build my cannon. (Actually - parts for my cannon. Another guy - VERY GOOD MACHINIST - built about half of the metal. I built the other half and all of the wood.

          Did I mention I had a cannon?



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          • #20
            Nice job on that Cannon. Is that your mule too? Always wanted one of those.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 6270 Productions View Post
              You drill a hole four times for each screw?

              Have you tried Forstner bits?

              I use something like this https://imged.com/aircraft-tools-mic...-13556235.html (similar, but not exactly like this - mine is old enough I can't even find anything like it)

              I also use mostly hardwood. I generally do not countersink pine. I find that the screw just "sinks" on its own, when I tighten it. It is my experience that folks aren't looking for perfection, when they are looking at pine as a construction material. On the other hand, they expect nice looking fasteners (when exposed) with walnut or other hardwoods - so I generally use brass screws.
              By Paul's method that is what you have to do. I understand his situation, been there many times.
              I do have a counter sink that cuts a clean tapered seat with out any tear out around the edges, even on soft pine. I think it's SKF or Dormer.
              I'll grab a pic tomorrow.

              I found this place a couple weeks ago when I was looking for Amana wing cutters. I stumbled across this page with these countersinks. I may try a few. They look like they would cut a clean taper hole.

              https://www.routerbitworld.com/Searc...ch=countersink

              JL.............

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              • #22
                Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                Use finishing washers if you're offended by the ragged hole edges.

                Maybe it's just the picture or lighting, but frankly the disparity in sizes of the countersink hole and the screw head look worse to me than a less-than-pristine countersink hole
                The disparity in sizes of the countersink hole and the screw head can be cause by two things, one cutting the countersink too deep and the other is because the edge of the screw head is has somewhat of a radius. If it were dead sharp you wouldn't see the gap. Probably just the blood from your fingers being cut by the screw head edge.

                There are special screws that have a sharp edge, I've seen them used on pianos. The head is flush with the surface and there is no gap around the edge.

                JL.............

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                  Nice job on that Cannon. Is that your mule too? Always wanted one of those.
                  Yep. The Mule was my first military vehicle.

                  The MB was given to my by a Battle of the Bulge First Sergeant.

                  My wife doesn't drive a manual transmission. She drives the Meep in parades.

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                  • #24
                    Amana makes some very nice cutting tools.

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                    • #25
                      Here is the countersink I use. Don't have to grab a pic, found them on the net.



                      https://il.rsdelivers.com/product/do...-drill/8126018

                      JL..................

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                      • #26
                        Well, you sure have me beat by a country mile. Those look great. Make my present project look like junk.

                        I love that safe and wonder if the combination lock actually works. If so, how many numbers? Can it be reset?



                        Originally posted by 6270 Productions View Post

                        I have been working wood for a very long time. I also was just trying to share.







                        Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 01-25-2020, 04:56 AM.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                        • #27
                          Actually I didn't remember that. I drilled the body sized hole first on the holes in the photo. I had to wing it while scoring it with the brad point bit. I picked two of the better holes for the photo. I took the liberty of writing it up as I should have done it.

                          A couple of posts have commented on a disparity between the screw head size and the countersink size. I only have the larger sizes of brad point drills by 32s, not 64s so there is a small difference: just a bit more then 1/64" in the diameter. But the technique tends to magnify the apparent difference due to the square edge as opposed to the 45 degree angle of a countersink. And the screws have a slightly rounded edge which further enhances it. I still think it looks a lot better than a countersink with tears, sometimes big ones, in the edge.



                          Originally posted by Baz View Post
                          I like the wonky bookcase.
                          Anyway the OP is interesting if I can just remember to cut the ring with the brad point before I've lost the centre by drilling the actual hole. I can see it being a good ruse before using a regular countersink to stop the tearout. Us on here should be able to knock up Gellflex's idea fairly easily for the common sizes........
                          Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 01-25-2020, 05:03 AM.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                            Well, you sure have me beat by a country mile. Those look great. Make my present project look like junk.

                            I love that safe and wonder if the combination lock actually works. If so, how many numbers? Can it be reset?



                            Thank you.

                            Yes, the lock actually works. However due to size limitations using wood vs. metal, there are only 20 numbers on the dial. The cam gates in the wheels and the size required for the lever nose will not allow enough numbers due to the size / diameter of the wheel pack.

                            It can be reset to different numbers and is pretty much the same procedure used on conventional combination locks.

                            The wheels are made from Bloodwood and the levers are Ebony. I used these woods for wear resistance and because they are "self-lubricating". You can have an extremely smooth and hard finish without actually applying a finish coat of "something". I believe that even an oil type finish would eventually gum up.

                            I did have to design the rather unorthodox spring set-up for the levers. There was not enough weight in them to allow them to properly follow the wheels in the wheel pack and thus drop into the cam gates. The spring solved this problem, but of course created more pressure between the levers and wheels - more possible wear.

                            Friction between the wheels in the pack also makes the functioning of the lock less than perfect. More than likely the remainder of the wheels in the pack will continue to move after the last wheel "dropped", when you change directions. If the lever nose falls (is pulled?) into the cam gate, all works well. If not, try again.

                            I actually had three goals in mind, when I built it.

                            Demonstrate to people how a three lever combination locks. That is why I installed the glass panel on the back of the door.

                            Add another safe to my collection. In fact, this one is designed after another one I have.

                            Successfully build a working combination safe from wood - cuz . . . you know . . . who else has one?

                            Special secrets for Home Shop Machinist forum members only -
                            The back panel is installed with screws just in case something goes wrong with the lock.
                            I wrote the combination in pencil on the outside of the back panel (I have enough numbers to remember.)
                            I don't keep anything of value inside the safe. Most of the time the door is standing open (to prevent moisture problems) and give the cat a place to hide.
                            A really determined individual could likely get into it with a semi-sharp pocket knife.
                            I put a handful of marbles between the double walls. It makes a bunch of noise, when being moved around - kind of a built in alarm system.


                            On a side note the cash register does NOT work. (Come on! That is a six inch rule sitting on the workbench in the front.) Well . . . the drawer opens and the curved front is hinged in the rear to allow it to be raised for the extra storage space under it. The gals at the True Value wanted to get something for their boss, when he retired and closed the store. They had no idea what I was going to do and I had "artistic license". I thought a cash register - as a gift from the gals working the cash register at the counter - would be something he would always remember. The "marble" shelf is actually solid surface countertop. The "lever buttons" are small knobs from my parts drawer. The brass decorations on the top are finials from my lamp parts box, I cut all of the other brass pieces from supplies I purchased from the store before he closed it. Of course, the sale for $20.18 was the year he retired.

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                            • #29
                              I use these, I don't do super delicate work but they seem to do a very nice job all the time for me. Only times I guess I see problems is with plywood.




                              Andy

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