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Bridgeport series 1 ram adapter woes

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  • #16
    Oh for fudge ripple sakes.
    The tee bolts are soft steel.
    The underside of the heads deform like cheese.
    Look in the picture and see.
    Instead of clamping, they create hoop stress and spread apart the circular slot.
    Happens all the time. Design flaw. Should have used a better bolt material
    or a larger tee head. Maybe it is hard for you guys to believe that the mighty
    Bridgeport made a design mistake. M-head tee bolts are even worse.
    So many armchair machine accident investigation experts here.

    -Doozer
    DZER

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    • #17
      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
      It's not where it's made, but the company that controls the QA/QC. Many fine products are made outside the USA, as is junk. Ebay is a great place to sell off "not quite meeting spec" parts. On the other hand, there are decent guys on Ebay too. Choose someone that been selling for decades - there's a reason they are still in business. 15 or so years ago I bought a few ram adapters on ebay - used genuine parts. They actually fitted into one of the Priority flat rate boxes of the day. Postie hated me until I offered to life them out of her truck.. lol

      With used get a guaranty from the seller that there is no cratering under the inner ring (it's is hard to see, but you can "feel" it). If there is he'll have to pay the freight back under EBAY's terms.
      It would be cool if a dude could get on a forum and ask machinists if they have purchased a particular part and seen the quality first hand.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Fear View Post
        I'm heading out tomorrow to pick up a Bridgeport. It's cheap, needs work, it's what I can afford right now. The owner claims it's in decent shape except for a broken ram adapter from over tightening. From what Google has shown me, this is fairly common. All the replacements I find are asian-made in the $300-$600 range and what claim to be non-import for three times as much. I'm figuring castings likely come from a limited number of places and a casting for a new "quality" Asian mill like an Acer or Sharp would be fine for a worn American Bridgeport. I'm just wondering if anyone has any horror stories on these and any place you recommend to buy one. I'm thinking pressing new bearings on the quiz and such should be reasonable while I have the ram apart, the head off and hitting it with the wire brushes before spraying some fresh paint on it. Also, what is the correct paint to use? Like a reference number to hit up the local auto paint store.

        He says it's hooked up and I'll be able to hear it and work it when I get there.
        Your going to need more than a wire brush to remove all the old cracked body filler and get down to clean cast iron. A good grade paint stripper will remove it, may take a couple applications. Then a wash down with lacquer thinner and the surface should be oil free and ready for body work.

        I wonder if that cracked from someone picking it with a fork lift?

        JL................

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Doozer View Post
          Oh for fudge ripple sakes.
          The tee bolts are soft steel.
          The underside of the heads deform like cheese.
          Look in the picture and see.
          Instead of clamping, they create hoop stress and spread apart the circular slot.
          Happens all the time. Design flaw. Should have used a better bolt material
          or a larger tee head. Maybe it is hard for you guys to believe that the mighty
          Bridgeport made a design mistake. M-head tee bolts are even worse.
          So many armchair machine accident investigation experts here.

          -Doozer
          I don't doubt your claims one bit. A person coming from a Chinese mini mill to a Beidgeport is going to think the Beidgeport is gods gift to machinists. A guy coming from a Tree mill is probably going to have the same opinion as Sir John had of Bridgeports.

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          • #20
            Man I always wanted to get my hands all over a Tree.
            They had ball splines for the spindle and power feeds
            built in to the knee. Cadillac of a machine I hear.

            -Doozer
            DZER

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
              Oh for fudge ripple sakes.
              The tee bolts are soft steel.
              The underside of the heads deform like cheese.
              Look in the picture and see.
              Instead of clamping, they create hoop stress and spread apart the circular slot.
              Happens all the time. Design flaw. Should have used a better bolt material
              or a larger tee head. Maybe it is hard for you guys to believe that the mighty
              Bridgeport made a design mistake. M-head tee bolts are even worse.
              So many armchair machine accident investigation experts here.

              -Doozer
              I don't think anyone said Bridgeport was perfect, however:

              The photo does not show what the bolts are made of
              Nobody that I know of has the original design documents
              There is no undeformed bolt to compare to in the pic
              (as if you can see 50 thou or whatever with the naked eye from 3 feet away in a dark pic -- you can't)

              In other words, assume nothing.

              FWIW I *have* seen that kind of damage before, applied to the bases of cheap chinese swivel vises, by untrained apes. I've also seen guys "power-shift" a geared-head lathe while in the middle of a cut, reducing the spindle RPM to zero when all the gear teeth broke off.

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              • #22
                Original B-port $375& free shipping-
                https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bridgeport-...AAAOSwN8hdsFGu

                I just need one more tool,just one!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Fear View Post
                  The only true American lathe is Standard Modern and the only true mill is Wells Index. The rest is Taiwan, Spain, Korea, etc.
                  The Standard Modern lathe is Canadian ...unless it has changed recently.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #24
                    Weird + 1
                    Rich
                    Green Bay, WI

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      To those with distaste for Bridgeport, please be aware :
                      Milling machines before 1938 were stodgy old clunkers
                      Doing versatile work required using large tables and angle plates and "Throat "

                      Bridgeport came out with :
                      1. A Ram machine (in/out) for broad Throat versatility
                      2. A swivel Turret that allowed multiple "heads to be used ( like slotting/milling ) and Milling ranges beyond the table size !
                      3. A mill with a Quill
                      4. 2,000 pounds , yet rigid
                      5. Variable speed Heads

                      The Impact in 1938 on the Pattern Maker trade was instantaneous !!!
                      It spilled over when WW II started and has never looked back
                      Work has been done on a Bridgeport that was deemed impossible before it became the answer to many fabrication problems

                      yes, some guys overdo it and want to hog a 5" inch face mill and complain that it has no guts, or it vibrates when they use a 2" x 6 " endmill in Stainless Steel (sic)
                      They would even complain when they have a 7,000 pound K & T and can't handle multiple tooling

                      The Point you ask ?
                      You come up with as versatile a machine--- and as "AFFORDABLE" a machine as Bridgeport did ---maybe I will listen to you.

                      Rich

                      Proud owner of BP mill # 3943 -made in 1943 and still kicking _ss

                      One more thing...When you have something good ...(like Aloris) Everyone wants to imitate it--but somehow never do it right !
                      Green Bay, WI

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
                        T
                        One more thing...When you have something good ...(like Aloris) Everyone wants to imitate it--but somehow never do it right !
                        Dorian did, and sells it for more than Aloris!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
                          To those with distaste for Bridgeport, please be aware
                          The Point you ask ?
                          You come up with as versatile a machine--- and as "AFFORDABLE" a machine as Bridgeport did ---maybe I will listen to you.
                          Rich
                          Proud owner of BP mill # 3943 -made in 1943 and still kicking _ss
                          Would love to have one, but my circumstances definitely prevent that. First mill I ever touched was a BP clone. So take it for what it's worth, I'm just spitballing here.

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                          • #28
                            Some of the BP clones (generically "VH4 style") are real nice ... 1000lb heavier, box ways, bigger knee. But... a "normal" BP and decent quality clones (some are garbage, others damn good) can do fine work too. All depends on the operator's understanding of reasonable limits.

                            I'd like a Series 2 BP. Real heavy, and rare.
                            Last edited by lakeside53; 01-26-2020, 07:43 PM.

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                            • #29
                              If anyone that that part laying around it would be H&W in Ft Wayne IN.

                              https://www.machinerypartsdepot.com
                              800-285-5271
                              Mike
                              Central Ohio, USA

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Local machinery dealers might have some scrap units. We got a table and leadscrew for like $70 or something. Hell we ought to have gotten some more parts when we were there, like the quill feed trips. See if you have any dealers near you should you buy it.
                                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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