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Bar & Chain Oil as Bearing Lube

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  • #16
    For metal protection forget veggie and mineral.
    Fluid Film used to be 3 partss Lanolin, 3 mineral oil and 7 paint thinner. That changed in 2015. The Lanoilin is gone replaced by a cheaper oil. I make my own Fluid Film and it's cheap to make.

    There is a superior oil product though that will wick thru rust and cling to steel. I ain't at liberty to publicly disclose it due to a man/huckster selling it as the miracle of the ages. It even has the property of being more viscous at low temperature than high.

    Side story, till 1920 there was a blast furnace operation at the mouth of the Genesee in Rochester making pigiron from Pa coal and Iron ore from Wayne County next to the Lake. Taconite was developed from better ore in Michigan and the Rochester operation closed down. People who had been making a living from digging that ore figured out Iron Oxide ore mixed with Linseed oil that could be squeezed from abundant flax growing in the area made great barn paint and a lot of barns got painted red for years into the Great Depression.
    About 15 years back as part of River happy development they dug up the kernel of the blast furnace nobody remembered and tried to bust it up to haul away. They reburied it because it couldn't be busted.

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    • #17
      I like this thread because it's been a while since we've debated using bar & chain oil on machine tools! 😀 (I use it daily as a way oil, works great, the sky does not fall.) That said, it's not nearly thick and tacky enough to address the OP's spindle bearing issue.

      There are industrial oils that are however thick you like.


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      • #18
        Originally posted by BCRider View Post

        Franz, I'd steer away from the Canola oil. I used Canola on my black powder handguns for day use or for when I'm using the guns within a few days. But over longer periods it converts to a varnish like film. And well before that it gums up badly to where it would make a great fly and mosquito sticky catcher.

        .......

        I can't recall why but at one point I put various oils including Canola on some raw steel and left it in the rain and elements for about 10 days. Well.. we had rain for two days and then it got sunny. I checked the progress daily and the motor oil, WD40 and a couple of other options were showing signs of some rust. The Canola was pristine though. At the end of it I thought the Canola looked a bit odd... Yep, it had cured with the sun and heat to a varnish like hardness in only 10 days.
        Well, yes..... it is an oil with "double bonds" in the chain of carbons, which will allow it to easily crosslink and form a paint-like film. Basically what you do to season a pan, or coat a carbon steel knife. Many vegetable oils are like that.

        Apparently good for lube if mixed with steam oil and "machne oil", per Keith Appleton, though. Probably does not let it crosslink.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #19
          When researching oils suitable for black powder use I ran across a few references to it being used for oiling steam engines on ships during WWII. Not sure if it was used before that or after as well but for many of the transports used in WWII apparently it worked like a charm. I didn't see if it was mixed with any other oil or not.

          The reason I use it for my cap and ball percussion revolvers is that it I found it cuts through the black powder fouling like a highly efficient solvent. They may be all slimy with black ooze but they keep running smoothly for the whole day. But they get lubed and protected with Ballistol after cleaning and for putting away after the weekend. Early on I thought being in the relative cool and dark would keep the Canola from gumming for at least a month or two. And more matches were coming up. But even after a month in the safe the Canola was starting to go sticky.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #20
            If you want a thick oil that won't gum up, I would look to good ol' STP or "motor honey". But I'm pretty sure that's not the right stuff for any kind of room temperature spindle. In other words, I would just find some straight non-detergent 30-wt and just let it run out. Lots of pre-war stuff was designed on a "total loss" oil system, and filtering was optional.

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            • #21
              I think I'll just toss a YaButt in here. I'd like to recommend Soy Diesel fuel as possibly the finest cleaner brought to us by Mother Nature Products Unlimited. That miracle product will clean out a fuel system slicker & faster than any other commercial product on the market and it's cheap. Nickle's hoarding it over in his town and won't let me have any less I drive over and get it.

              Mother Nature Products Unlimited also makes a very good paint stripper from Soy bean oil, and Polysorbate 20, 40 and 80 also come from them beans. 20 in a commercial dishwasher with hot water is fantastic for oil removal from parts and emulsifys the oil for convenient disposal down the sewer. Don't even try manufacturing commercial ice cream without Polysorbate either, you'll go broke trying to puff it with compressed air.

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              • #22
                Re the topic headline; no. Just no.

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                • #23
                  As the originator of this topic, I have concluded that the answer is NO! The real solution is a sight glass drip oiler like the ones used on make and break gas engines with 30 wt ND oil or 90 wt GL1 gear oil (about 50 wt engine oil). Controlled, constant lubrication. With the drip oiler, there would be a stead flow through the bearing and with the glass reservoir, and sight glass, it would be easy to monitor it.
                  Peter
                  Grantham, New Hampshire

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by CPeter View Post
                    As the originator of this topic, I have concluded that the answer is NO! The real solution is a sight glass drip oiler like the ones used on make and break gas engines with 30 wt ND oil or 90 wt GL1 gear oil (about 50 wt engine oil). Controlled, constant lubrication. With the drip oiler, there would be a stead flow through the bearing and with the glass reservoir, and sight glass, it would be easy to monitor it.
                    Peter
                    Being that its a wood lathe it is most likely working at a higher RPM than a metal lathe. I would definitely favor the 30-wt ND. Historical note: Delco invented what we now call "ATF" (automatic transmission fluid) to replace whale oil back in the 1930's IIRC one of the slipperiest oils known that can take a high temperature. The reason why I mention this is, that it may be good to think about what kind of oils were in use back when the lathe was made. Maybe do some research online, looking of old ads or literature that mentions oil or machines.

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                    • #25
                      The bearings are designed to run on a thin film of oil. Thick oil will not create the film fast enough for the bearings to not be damaged from brief periods of running dry. You may be missing some felting, which will wick and hold onto the oil and slowly dribble it out (or the wicks can be hardened with old oil).

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                      • #26
                        Nickel forgot to mention Sperm Whale oil is the only oil known to man that runs toward heat rather than being repelled from heat.

                        That single fact made Harold Silloway millions of dollars after he got the brainstorm to mix Spermoil with TriChlorEthylene and sell it as Monroe Cool Tool. As Spermoil became more expensive and harder to get Harold spent a few years looking for a replacement even talking to actual chemists from Kodak off the books, then he retired to count his money and play with his airplanes and prewar English roadsters spending years searching for a boattail Morgan worth having he could buy. Harold remained certain to his deathbed nobody knew what was in CoolTool. He neglected to factor in all his arriving supplies rode on the same truck.
                        He neglected also to factor in the driver hated him because Harold wouldn't install equipment to facilitate handling 55 G drums that didn't require the driver to bust his ass.

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                        • #27
                          Speaking of running towards the heat, this maybe crazy, but I wonder if beeswax would do it.... hrmmm, I've used it to bust loose frozen parts, just warm it up and apply wax

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                            Speaking of running towards the heat, this maybe crazy, but I wonder if beeswax would do it.... hrmmm, I've used it to bust loose frozen parts, just warm it up and apply wax
                            Birthday candles work better.
                            Clean beeswax melts around 120, dirty direct from the hive will be higher depending on what the bee mixed in for an extender.

                            Nice thing about using wax is you don't have to go high temp on the connection.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Franz© View Post

                              Birthday candles work better.
                              Clean beeswax melts around 120, dirty direct from the hive will be higher depending on what the bee mixed in for an extender.

                              Nice thing about using wax is you don't have to go high temp on the connection.
                              Cool, thx for the tip. Knowing WNY I bet the bees around here mixed asbestos in. Why not, it's everywhere else.

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                              • #30
                                Nuttin wrong with Asbestos unless you piss off the wrong man and he calls in NYDEC about the dumping in the unapproved place and they call in DOT and NYS Labor the contracted enforcer for OSHA who take a dim view of employing drunks & junkies with snow shovels, scrapers & brooms to disappear all the pipe covering form a building you bought cheap because it was full of asbestos.

                                I've rendered a few beehives worth of wax after they were abandoned. Wax gets stuffed into a stocking and dropped into about 150° water with a bit of vinegar added and cooks for a few hours. The wax cooks out of the stocking and coats the water and the crud stays in the stocking. Crud will be about equal weight to the wax. Honeybees build in a manner similar to brick masons.

                                Paper wasps, the football shaped hanging nest are even better builders. They manufacture their own paper with spit and veggie matter and lay up the cardboard.
                                Those nests can be considerable fun when a teacher hangs one in a classroom this time of year. Seems teachers don't know the nest contains growing larvae for the coming Spring crop of wasps. Week or so in that warm room and baby meat eating wasps begin leaving the nest to check their neighborhood.
                                Wear ear protection cause them teachers scream loud when they meet a wasp close up and personal.

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