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  • Unusual circlip

    I'm cleaning up an old 6in Cardinal Speed Vise. It's in good shape except for the drill hits. The lead screw is a buttress thread and has a slight bend I'd like to straighten.

    The lead screw has a ball end and it is held in the movable jaw with a snap ring made of what looks like round wire (probably spring wire) with a short gap between the wire ends, in an ID groove. There is nothing to grab the wire with, and it just continues to run around in it's groove when trying to get a pick under it. I can't see any feature in the casting for getting a tool under it.

    Can anyone advise the procedure for removing such a clip?

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Cardinal_vise_lead_screw_anotated.jpg Views:	0 Size:	216.1 KB ID:	1854288
    Last edited by jmarkwolf; 02-09-2020, 12:59 PM.

  • #2
    Where's the bend in the lead? can u support it before and aft and press in the middle where the bend is? then you can just leave the other mess alone...

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    • #3
      Hi A.K.

      That might end up being the only good option, but it would certainly be more convenient to work on without that big lump of cast iron on the end!

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      • #4
        2 90 deg picks.

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        • #5
          Something like a dentists probe and juggled about very near one of the ends of the circlip. A second probe to make sure the bugger doesn't slip back. And patience. Usually, there was a tiny slot somewhere to lift the circlip off, but only if the manufacturer intended for the easy serviceability of the assembly.

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          • #6
            Use a set of snap ring plyers. there is a set made for this, the ends are L shaped and expand when griped. Place the ends in the gap and grip.

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            • #7
              Use a set of snap ring plyers. there is a set made for this, the ends are L shaped and expand when griped. Place the ends in the gap and grip.
              Yes, but patience, and expect them to slip and not work the first time (or the second..., but eventually).
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #8
                These circlips were never meant to be removed. Boomer had the right solution.
                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                • #9
                  It could also be designed to just pull out under pressure (pull pressure) and while rotating around full circle like...

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                  • #10
                    Those rings can be a royal pain in the bum. Old mart had it right. You need to somehow stop the thing from rotating while you get a pick under one end. Once you get an end out it should pop right out.
                    Larry - west coast of Canada

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                    • #11
                      I've seen that kind of thing used in starter motors as a retaining clip. One I worked on, the ring was so worn the parts came off the shaft and fell out when I pulled the armature.

                      I imagine that making a rounded groove for a ring to fit would be easier than a 'square' recess, and it would leave the shaft stronger as well because there's no sharp corners in the groove. It might also impart a self-centering action to whatever is being held captive on the shaft.

                      Removal of the ring- sure, the right tool is the one to use. I've made plenty of custom tools for things like this from bicycle spokes. You can take advantage of the bend that's already on the spoke, and just grind to suit. Keep the retaining nuts for the spokes and use them as a small burr-free knob on the threaded end. I also saved some motorcycle spokes to make custom picks from as well. One of my drawers for holding small parts is labelled 'spoke tools'.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        Snap ring pliers, IF you can get them to work. Probably using the 45° tips. I have extra tips so that I can file/grind them for odd situations like this.
                        Otherwise, a couple of picks like mentioned. Use 2 picks to open the end and pull it upwards in the groove, which should create a gap on the top (between the shaft and the ring). Have a helper slip a straight pick or small flat blade screwdriver in that gap. Once you made it this far, you are home free. Put your picks under the ring on both sides of the pick or screwdriver (the little weird picks with a 30° jog-bend work well) and work it off.

                        Added: If you don't have several sets of cheap picks, they are only a buck or two at HF, so I keep several sets on hand to abuse, cut up or otherwise destroy.
                        Last edited by Joel; 02-09-2020, 03:46 PM.
                        Location: North Central Texas

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                        • #13
                          And the desperate way............ hold an end down with screwdriver, heat a tiny section red hot in middle, lift other end with pic or tiny screwdriver.

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                          • #14
                            The problem with these wire circlips in a bore, is that the ends are not always bent inwards. This is because the ends would then interfere with the assembly. A common use for this type is in piston pins, the pin has a tiny chamfer, and the piston always has a removal slot, which makes removal easy, as long as some fool doesn't line up the ends of the circlip with the slot when assembling.

                            I have just thought of a solution: Drill a 1/16" hole through to where the groove is and then push the circlip out of the way.


                            https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WISECO-CW...4AAOSwd4tT1nlb
                            Last edited by old mart; 02-09-2020, 04:05 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Do you have a mill in your arsenal of tools? If so, hold the casting in a vise and position the spindle over the grove location as close as possible. Drill down (spot face first?) to the clip and then push on the clip with a rod or punch of some sort. This will collapse the wire enough to get a small pick under it. When done you could thread the extra hole and put a set screw in it so it won't be a swarf collection point.

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