Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Unusual circlip

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    You have to "unwind" those over the shaft like a spring. But don't stretch it much. Those are typically used in high-load applications where a standard E-Clip or spring clip would break.

    Comment


    • #17
      This has a ball retained in a casting by a circlip?

      Is the circlip on the screw or (as it seems) is it in the casting?

      If in the casting, circlip pliers cannot work as they would make it tighter in the casting. You have to use the picks and spring it INWARDS to extract it.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        This has a ball retained in a casting by a circlip?

        Is the circlip on the screw or (as it seems) is it in the casting?

        If in the casting, circlip pliers cannot work as they would make it tighter in the casting. You have to use the picks and spring it INWARDS to extract it.
        Exactly.
        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

        Comment


        • #19
          Excellent discussion everybody. Thank you.

          I'm going to do as A.K.Boomer suggests and leave the wire circlip alone, and find an alternate means of supporting the lead screw while straightening the bend "in situ". I'm sure the original bend was done manually by some Magilla to apply extra tightness. The vise is stout enough to use it's own half nut to effect a re-bend, while supporting the rest of the lead screw appropriately, etc.

          I'm currently doing the evapo-rust thing to all the parts. I'll report back later.

          Comment


          • #20
            JMW, those are strange and somewhat vulnerable threads for trying to straighten, you could possible flat spot them due to having to slightly go past the straight point due to rebound effect, so the ticket might be to just measure the OD of the threads and then drill a hole in a piece of aluminum stock that's the OD of the threads - maybe a piece an inch long - then cut in half to two half inch pieces - then cut those pieces down the middle to have 4 half moon pieces --- all you need is 3 of them - use 2 to hold the outer parts of the thread and then 1 to press in the middle... should be enough surface area and also soft material to not harm your threads...

            Edit; a thinking improvement, bore a hole in square stock, and bore it .010" undersize --- this way the half clams will slightly grip the lead and the square outer will keep it from flopping around...
            Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 02-10-2020, 10:52 AM.

            Comment


            • #21
              If this is a round wire ring it most likely needs to be compressed into the groove on the shaft. Generous amounts of lube put some pressure on the shaft, may need to rotate wiggle the shaft, the ring will collapse into the groove on the shaft. On assembly the ring is installed on the shaft, compressed, shaft inserted in hole, when the ring reaches the groove in the bore it expands to lock the shaft in. This type of retention is very common on axle shafts. Also seen on air impact tools on the square shaft the socket fits onto.

              Ed

              Comment


              • #22
                I have a couple of speedvises. A 6" and a 4 ". The 6" one had a lot of drill holes in it so I just used a piece of CRS to replace it. If I remember correctly you can flip it over but mine had holes all the way through it and I had the right size stock so replacement is was. I never tried to take the circlip out. What is your reason for wanting to remove it?

                Brian
                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                Comment


                • #23
                  Hi Brian

                  The reason was for convenience for straightening the slight bend in the lead screw. Pursuing other options now.

                  I've also got two Cardinal Speed Vises.I inherited the 4in from my dad, and bought the 6in from a local pawn shop for $30. The 4in is one of my earliest memories of my dad's shop, and I'm nearly 65 now.

                  The 6in needs some TLC.

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	Speedvises2.JPG Views:	0 Size:	677.0 KB ID:	1854706
                  Last edited by jmarkwolf; 02-11-2020, 11:59 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I can't really see a picture of the snap ring to add any useful suggestions.
                    If it's what I think it is, you might try working some thin tempered shims
                    In in between the ring and the hole in a couple spots and then try and pull the screw out to see if you can get the ring to jump the groove.

                    JL.....
                    Last edited by JoeLee; 02-11-2020, 01:43 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 754 View Post
                      2 90 deg picks.
                      you can't pick it out of there, it has to be compressed.

                      JL...

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                        you can't pick it out of there, it has to be compressed.

                        JL...
                        You can pick your circlip, you can pick your friends circlip --- but you can't pick your friends nose while he's trying to remove a circlip (nor any other time cuz that's just mezzed up)

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                          These circlips were never meant to be removed. Boomer had the right solution.
                          Yes and no, They weren't meant to be easily removed anyway.

                          Blackhawk used them on their snap set port o power couplings. Only the expandable ring was used to create some drag when coupling extension tubes and accessories. The female part didn't have a groove cut into it for the ring to lock into. Those rings are hard.





                          My post #24 is probably the best bet to remove the screw from the vise head, and I would cut a larger groove in the end of the screw where the ring was, drill and tap the top of the vise and put a dog point set screw in there so you can remove the screw if you have to in the future. That hole looks pretty sloppy. Perhaps you could bore and sleeve it while you at it.

                          JL.................



                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Seeing the pic, no reason to remove. Just straighten where it sits. Lay a piece of flat bar atop the thread with a DI on it. Find high spot ..push.. check ..repeat.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I don't think the makers of that vise ever envisioned this being taken apart.

                              As JoeLee said, it snap ring pliers probably won't work. If you do try them, you may have to sacrifice a pair of tips by sharpening them for the job: small enough to reach in and perhaps a small "hook" to scoop up the ends of the wire. My snap ring pliers use tips made of hex stock. I could use a couple of hex wrenches (keys) to make such a pair. They are relatively inexpensive and I even have a bunch of orphans in a bin somewhere that I could raid.

                              I would hang it by the screw in a vise and rig a weight or something to put a mild amount of force on the joint. Then use a pick or knife blade to work the ring out of the slot a little at a time. Perhaps start at one end with a right angle pick.



                              Originally posted by OKChipmaker View Post
                              Use a set of snap ring plyers. there is a set made for this, the ends are L shaped and expand when griped. Place the ends in the gap and grip.
                              Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 02-11-2020, 06:04 PM.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Here's another thought. A real small abrasive point in a Dremel tool could be used to chop the wire up into shorter pieces that would fall out. Two or three cuts would probably do it. By real small I mean something about the diameter of the wire clip itself.

                                Then just make a new clip to reassemble it.
                                Paul A.
                                SE Texas

                                Make it fit.
                                You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X