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Possible Tool Gloat & Tool Usage Info

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  • Possible Tool Gloat & Tool Usage Info

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1854598 Picked up a bunch of drill bits at Auction with a selection of other items.Question regarding the 5/16 x 18 tap,can they be used under power or only hand tapping.Also the endmill looking Cutter with 3/32" drill bit held with a set screw what purpose is it for,last one is the short bits with 1/4" NF threads which I assume go in a shank for sheet metal. Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    Should be no prob power tapping with that, I've even done it with a hand drill. Dunno about the end mill looking thing, maybe some kind of drill/spot face deal?

    Comment


    • #3
      Big 'ol counterbore and little hole?

      The three drills look to be for a "Terry Angle" or similar drill setup for places you can't get straight into.

      Like this

      Last edited by J Tiers; 02-10-2020, 11:10 PM.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        only thing with form taps is they can be picky about hole diameter. There are plenty of online resources showing tap drills for form taps. They make beautiful threads in aluminium and I use them for that whenever I can. Not sure I'd trust myself to use a form tap in a hand drill, but I've used cutting taps in a hand drill a bunch. Makes life alot easier!

        sounds like you got a great deal, congrats!

        Comment


        • #5
          That tap should be fine for power tapping, especially if it's a spiral flute. Can't tell from the pic.

          The counterbore is marked as such on the package. The 5/16" marked on the package refers to the
          nominal size of the socket head capscrew which it is meant to be used with. A 5/16" socket head cap
          has a nominal head diameter of .470" so the counterbore should be .500" diameter.. Assuming that
          there is a setscrew in the counterbore to hold a plilot in place I suspect that someone has just popped
          a drill bit in the hole instead. Pilots are available in different sizes and are meant to be interchangeable...
          Keith
          __________________________
          Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

          Comment


          • #6
            The tap looks like a form tap as I am not seeing any flutes in it. If so power tapping is probably the only way you want to use it and make sure that you have the hole the proper size. Also, I have read that you can form tap hardened steel up to around Rc 60.
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
              That tap should be fine for power tapping, especially if it's a spiral flute. Can't tell from the pic.

              The counterbore is marked as such on the package. The 5/16" marked on the package refers to the
              nominal size of the socket head capscrew which it is meant to be used with. A 5/16" socket head cap
              has a nominal head diameter of .470" so the counterbore should be .500" diameter.. Assuming that
              there is a setscrew in the counterbore to hold a plilot in place I suspect that someone has just popped
              a drill bit in the hole instead. Pilots are available in different sizes and are meant to be interchangeable...
              Keith I just stuck a 3/32" drill bit in it for clarity,but it's 5/16" straight through my counter bores have a larger Cutter built in to allow Allan Head Cap Screw To be counter sunk.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                The tap looks like a form tap as I am not seeing any flutes in it. If so power tapping is probably the only way you want to use it and make sure that you have the hole the proper size. Also, I have read that you can form tap hardened steel up to around Rc 60.
                There are fine flutes parallel with tap.

                Comment


                • #9
                  those are to help with keeping lubricant/ tapping fluid in the threads, maybe some space for displaced material that doesn't form thread crests to go. Either way, it's definitely a form tap.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Lets see more of the rest, like the Kennemetal holders, inserts, some of the carbide drills or mills.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 754 View Post
                      Lets see more of the rest, like the Kennemetal holders, inserts, some of the carbide drills or mills.
                      Here is a pic of some of the goodies ,90% is Cleveland or Greenfeild ,lots of # drill bits that I put in clear tubes as these are spares,I will built plastic saddles for them to store in drawers when time allows.The larger bits are Cle-Max which I've never heard of before,the Carbide&HSS endmills are all ball endmills,I'm sure I may use some of the carbides for side milling some harder if need be. Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2393.JPG Views:	0 Size:	1.54 MB ID:	1854911

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                      • #12
                        I prefer split dies for cutting a new thread, those die nuts are ok for running down an existing thread to clean it up though. As for the tap, in Blighty, we would call it a roll tap. If you intend to use it on a job, it would be safer to drill a set of test holes in a piece of the same alloy and start with the largest hole first, working down until you get a good thread which doesn't run a risk of breaking the tap using good cutting oil, or ep gear oil. There are probably tables with the recommended hole sizes for different alloys. The metal must be ductile.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "Many" hexagon dies are specifically for re-threading. I have a couple sets for US NC and NF, and they work well for that.

                          Lots of crusty old machinist types will see a hex die and say "that's for rethreading only". But it may not be true, some makers put out hex dies that are intended for actual thread cutting, notably older Craftsman. It's open to question whether ANY Craftsman threading die is good enough to actually thread something, but that's another issue.

                          You can tell the difference by looking at the cutting edge. A "threading" die will have a "hook" form, the edge will have "positive rake", suitable for peeling off a chip. A "RE-threading" die may have NEGATIVE rake, or neutral rake, such that it does not aggressively "cut into" a surface, but will re-form or cut away anything that sticks out where it should not be.

                          The actual shape of the outside of the die has nothing to do with how it works.

                          Now, looking at those dies, it immediately jumps out at me that the chip pockets are shallow, and the hole forming the pocket is so located that it will NOT form a positive rake "hook", but rather a negative or neutral rake. So I'd give those a 90% or better chance of being for RE-threading, given no further info nor a good close-up.

                          RE-threading dies are very good to have around for repair work.... they can save you needing to replace a less-than-critical stud, for instance (I'd prefer not to use one on a modern engine head stud... but might do for an exhaust or intake).

                          It looks like that is a metric set, which is nice, I only have US thread types.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 02-13-2020, 08:02 PM.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Those Kennametal holders look brand new, nice. What are the bits in box on right ? Die grinder stuff ?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Greenfeild set are retreading dies,all items are new and container on right side are short drill bits with 1/4" NF Shank as Tiers showed in post#3
                              $125 for all

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