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GE 44ton Locomotive

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  • #16
    That Bison chuck is probably the best part. The neighbors split it up so no one would build a mansion next to them, like he did to us. Selling it was for the best, taxes over 16,000 a year and more people like him moving in constantly, and taxes going up every year. 16,000 a year for me is the same as a new car each year or a lot of nice tooling / machines.

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    • #17
      Click image for larger version

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      Here's a 44 ton a friend of mine finished this past fall. It was kind of a fast project, never saw a loco built in a couple of months before. It might get some detail bits this year - bearing caps and brake rigging, maybe a bit more.
      Attached Files

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      • #18
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        That Bison chuck is probably the best part. The neighbors split it up so no one would build a mansion next to them, like he did to us. Selling it was for the best, taxes over 16,000 a year and more people like him moving in constantly, and taxes going up every year. 16,000 a year for me is the same as a new car each year or a lot of nice tooling / machines.
        So, they are going to tear down the camp itself?
        The garage was a nice sized one. Kind of hard to get down there.
        Yeah, taxes are ridiculous in the area, let alone right on the lake. I've always wanted to vandalize the signs that say "Welcome to Skaneateles" with Welcome to $kaneatele$.

        Haha.

        Need to get a covert night operation together........

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        • #19
          I never would have guessed that the place was pronounced "Skinny Atlas".

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          • #20
            Originally posted by old mart View Post
            I never would have guessed that the place was pronounced "Skinny Atlas".
            Skan-e-at-al-es

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            • #21
              Originally posted by sid pileski View Post

              So, they are going to tear down the camp itself?
              The garage was a nice sized one. Kind of hard to get down there.
              Yeah, taxes are ridiculous in the area, let alone right on the lake. I've always wanted to vandalize the signs that say "Welcome to Skaneateles" with Welcome to $kaneatele$.

              Haha.

              Need to get a covert night operation together........
              They are going to keep it. That workshop / garage is new. Didn't help things that my mother unexpectedly dropped dead of a heart attack. Pretty much ruined long term plans there.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by rkepler View Post
                Click image for larger version

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ID:	1855280

                Here's a 44 ton a friend of mine finished this past fall. It was kind of a fast project, never saw a loco built in a couple of months before. It might get some detail bits this year - bearing caps and brake rigging, maybe a bit more.
                He went for the ,"Lets have fun now, enjoy the hobby, looks good enough" route. My OCD got in the way, taking measurements of the real deal from the one at the "Niles Canyon RR", I am going for the scale look, "Makes 10,000x more work for myself" route. In the meantime he is enjoying the hobby, and I'm not.

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                • #23
                  Small update, work in progress, changed the drive system to a double reduction gear drive, 10:1. I will either buy or make these gears out of steel using an appropriate cutter. 20 pitch, 20 deg pressure angle. Will 3D print a scale looking dust cover that wraps around the gear train. It will offer no structural support. I created a second branch on my Github called "Development", where you can find the continual updates.
                  The gears in the model are not modeled perfectly, so don't bother looking for the correct involute.
                  Click image for larger version

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                  Last edited by RB211; 02-28-2020, 06:51 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Would like to add, have been reading some period books from the 1920's re steam power, and what boggles my mind is the sheer dead weight of the big Mikado and Prairie loco's.... often well over 200,000 lbs. Thats *just* for the engine. And with a line contact under each wheel... leave it to some bright young engineer to figure the tractive power of that much weight with steel on steel (line contact) and assume (say) 2,000 HP at a few hundred RPM.....

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                      Would like to add, have been reading some period books from the 1920's re steam power, and what boggles my mind is the sheer dead weight of the big Mikado and Prairie loco's.... often well over 200,000 lbs. Thats *just* for the engine. And with a line contact under each wheel... leave it to some bright young engineer to figure the tractive power of that much weight with steel on steel (line contact) and assume (say) 2,000 HP at a few hundred RPM.....
                      There will be plenty of opportunity to fill cavities in the frame of this locomotive with lead, or something else. As far as tractive effort, also drawbar pull. The steamers suffered from not having their full power at a standstill like diesel electrics do, but a single steamer could do the work of multiple diesels.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                        There will be plenty of opportunity to fill cavities in the frame of this locomotive with lead, or something else. As far as tractive effort, also drawbar pull. The steamers suffered from not having their full power at a standstill like diesel electrics do, but a single steamer could do the work of multiple diesels.
                        The physics boggles my mind still. Steamers have far more low-rpm grunt than an IC engine ever will, but you're right, electric motors have a square torque curve.... and torque is king when all you have is dead weight and no movement. Torque is the ultimate lever.

                        BTW you should see the old water pumping engines in downtown Buffalo.... ran them from 1915 up to 1980. They worked just fine, got taken out of service because electric pumps finally became cheaper. The steamers were putting 1200 HP at 25 RPM, pumping 950 gallons per stroke with a 30,000 lb flywheel. Five engines in the water dept. Imagine what the gas bill was to fire those boilers!

                        EDIT in case you're wondering, the stroke was 66 inches
                        Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-28-2020, 07:14 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          The physics boggles my mind still. Steamers have far more low-rpm grunt than an IC engine ever will, but you're right, electric motors have a square torque curve.... and torque is king when all you have is dead weight and no movement. Torque is the ultimate lever.

                          BTW you should see the old water pumping engines in downtown Buffalo.... ran them from 1915 up to 1980. They worked just fine, got taken out of service because electric pumps finally became cheaper. The steamers were putting 1200 HP at 25 RPM, pumping 950 gallons per stroke with a 30,000 lb flywheel. Five engines in the water dept. Imagine what the gas bill was to fire those boilers!

                          EDIT in case you're wondering, the stroke was 66 inches
                          If I ever find myself back in Upstate New York(very unlikely as the family lake cabin was sold and I'm upset about it), I'll have to check it out.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                            If I ever find myself back in Upstate New York(very unlikely as the family lake cabin was sold and I'm upset about it), I'll have to check it out.
                            Yeah, I tell people the land up here is absolutely beautiful, but you can't afford to live here unless you're a greaseball multi-millionaire or a lawyer. Damn crooks are ruining NY even more than it already was. It's sad because I was born here but I'm planning to retire in northern Iowa. Property taxes in Iowa are like less than 1k for 50 acres with a house. But its a 2-hour drive to anywhere.

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                            • #29
                              Further progress. The bushings were annoying me, replaced them with ball bearings, and further refined the axle design. I am liking this design far more.
                              Click image for larger version

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