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Teco Westinghouse VFD's

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  • #16
    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
    rb : I've never had that issue. Happens all the time on power glitches etc. We have hundreds of VFDs running on hvac, pumps etc, and no way to stop power interruptions/restoration.
    The addition of disabling the pause or continue run after power loss is what did it in combination of switching the power off and on with the E-stop.
    You're all free to do as you wish.

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    • #17
      I have 4 TECO's . Bridgeport 10 years, Clausing 8530 8 years, Clausing 5900 9 years, Quincy 7.5HP air compressor 6 years. No issues so far.

      Bob

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      • #18
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

        The addition of disabling the pause or continue run after power loss is what did it in combination of switching the power off and on with the E-stop.
        You're all free to do as you wish.
        I think you just got caught with a Dud. It's standard practise to have a VFD restart after power loss, or not, as the application requires. Sometime you frequency match, sometimes just "go", sometimes dc brake first, pause whatever, then go; any combination you can think of. The VFD (quality or working correctly ) looks after itself.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

          I think you just got caught with a Dud. It's standard practise to have a VFD restart after power loss, or not, as the application requires. Sometime you frequency match, sometimes just "go", sometimes dc brake first, pause whatever, then go; any combination you can think of. The VFD (quality or working correctly ) looks after itself.
          Well, I still need to take it apart and fix it. Returning it has sailed away.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

            I think you just got caught with a Dud. It's standard practise to have a VFD restart after power loss, or not, as the application requires. Sometime you frequency match, sometimes just "go", sometimes dc brake first, pause whatever, then go; any combination you can think of. The VFD (quality or working correctly ) looks after itself.
            I don't think so. Dad had an input wire come loose on his cheapo, lost a leg, and killed the VFD right away.
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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            • #21
              I have a Teco on my Bridgeport that is about 10-12 years old, so it does not mean that my issue is in a current model.

              My only complaint is the whine that I hear when it is on. It is nerve racking. I do not hear it when the mill is running, but when I stop the mill, I am forced to
              shut down VFD power until I need to run the mill again. I have a Hitachi on my other mill for 18 years and it is quiet and a dream.
              just thought I'd mention this to see if it is on the current model ?
              Rich

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              • #22
                Does your TECO not have a setting for the "carrier" or "pulse" frequency?

                Most allow setting it to a frequency that is outside normal hearing, with the slight disadvantage of some increased heating.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                  I don't think so. Dad had an input wire come loose on his cheapo, lost a leg, and killed the VFD right away.
                  Then the vfd must be junk. Power gets lost all the time - vfds don't blow up because of it.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post

                    Then the vfd must be junk. Power gets lost all the time - vfds don't blow up because of it.
                    If it was 3 phase input, was operating at high power, and lost one wire so it "single phased", then it might have overstressed the input rectifier because all the power was going through fewer rectifiers. The VFDs are pretty optimized for cost these days.

                    That is exactly why people talk abut de-rating VFDs for single phase input.

                    If it was rated for, and being fed with single phase already, then losing a wire should have been like shutting off power, no big deal.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #25
                      I'll buy that on three phase, but any vfd worth it's salt has parameters to shut down on phase loss. I always turn that on. There are millions of vfd on continuous use that will restart on power loss and deal with a single fuse failure or whatever.

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                      • #26
                        Rapid cycling and high frequency noise on input power from a bad connection might cause stress on the rectifiers, especially if there are series NTC thermistors for surge limiting, that won't work if they are still hot. If an ordinary three phase input VFD can be used successfully on single phase, loss of a phase would not cause shut down.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #27
                          but you should automatically shut it down if loss off a phase can result in exceeding the single phase capability.

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                          • #28
                            IIRC, the TECO have a thermal inrush protector of the "Negative temperature coefficient" type (NTC) as the sole protective device for inrush. They are high resistance when cold, and low when hot, i.e. when in use. If the device is in use, gets disconnected, and reconnected in a reasonably short time, the protector may still be in a low resistance state, as Paul mentions.

                            The inrush current in that condition "could" be excessive and cause a failure. It is usual to test for that in development, however, and it should not be an issue. There are conditions, however, in which it could be an issue.

                            The best is a combination, a thermal inrush device, plus a relay to short it in normal operation. That gives a good charging response, and allows the "NTC" device to cool off and be ready for any dropout situations.

                            I do not know if the TECO have phase loss protection. It is essentially required for high power VFDs, but may not be provided for low power types, and may not even be necessary at low power.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 02-21-2020, 12:30 PM.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              Does your TECO not have a setting for the "carrier" or "pulse" frequency?

                              Most allow setting it to a frequency that is outside normal hearing, with the slight disadvantage of some increased heating.
                              Thanks Jerry for the hint. Tried the 5 different carrier frequencies available and none changed the whine. Two did change the motor noise (louder) but the whine stayed.
                              I believe it is the fan...been that way since day one , so is not a lube problem IMHO
                              Rich

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