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OT - How to Ring My Bell

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  • #16
    UM, that's a NoGo. AC coil will usually have a heavy copper shunt around the lamination to minimize hum during the time the piston is extended after it had struck the dome. Same coil will fuction on DC.

    SET used the same coils on chimes that alerted store and hospital employees prior to overhead voice paging, and a humming chime was annoying as hell.

    Second- the bolt hole is not centered, and the dome itself is adjusted for volume by rotating to deliver ring volume by where in the hammer stroke hammer & dome ring as desired. Some have a dot on the inside to indicate maximum loudness and others are keyed with a dimple & depression.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Franz© View Post
      How will solid state handle the spike coming back from the coil of the bell as the flux field collapses?
      Flux Capacitor

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      • #18
        Use a cheap double bell old style ararm clock Makes a great 22 target at 500 yards. We're hitting golf balls on caracord atound pipe & 1.5"h steel eggs at 300 yards with 22s. Check your attics you might have a heat alarm that winds up. Several years ago my wife & I went to a free dinner about heat alarms & the guy told the stoy about one saving a family didn't even know it was there. They wind up & use a bimetal themastat. He priced my sons house about $5k, I got on ebay & bought 8 for we;; inder $100 shipped all tested & working.

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        • #19
          Tried to reply earlier but for some reason (my) Chrome does not let me whrite anything in the reply box.

          The first picture shows the voltage and current which I can't read but on the AC fields. If you put a simple diode in series you will get half cycle pulses that should work pretty well. That's how coffee machine pumps work.
          Helder Ferreira
          Setubal, Portugal

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          • #20
            I thought I seen a long time ago with "some" bells like in the pic that all's they used was a simple spring loaded solenoid with contacts - the solenoid gets activated, tosses a little hammer into the bell but just before that happens the solenoid gets disconnected - the momentum carries the hammer into the bell then the hammer/solenoid comes back from the spring pressure engaging the contacts again and repeat,

            I think the contacts were encased cuz as you can imagine it's rapid spark city inside but not like it's powering a 5 HP motor or anything...

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            • #21
              Anyone using a Klaxon type Submarine Dive alarm,..? Now that will get the attention of the entire shop!!
              S E Michigan

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              • #22
                Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                Electronic circuits for this are a bit extreme. Why not use your machining and mechanical skills to duplicate the simple electromechanical doorbells from the 1940s-1960s. Well explained here:

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_bell

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                If I can't find a solution that comes close to plug-N-play (or splice-N-play) I'm just going to put in a momentary switch and repeatedly push as desired.

                I work in my shop for fun. The electrical stuff isn't fun for me. And building a doorbell from scratch isn't going on my to-do list! 😎

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                • #23
                  I refust to click on that Chuck Berry link, I've heard enough "my ding-aling's" to last a lifetime.
                  If there are no points, then it must run on AC, probably through a transformer without any rectifying circuit.
                  Last edited by old mart; 02-12-2020, 05:31 PM.

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                  • #24
                    A bell is a bell. They all work the same. With power on, and the points closed, the solenoid moves the clapper which hits the bell. Somewhere on the way the points disconnect the power. The clapper hits the bell and moves back to its home position, On the way back, the points contact again, it gets power, and the cycle repeats.

                    If you get just the one clang, then the points are not being opened on the way, and the clapper is being held against the inside of the bell under power.

                    Take the bell off, bend the clapper away fron the inside of the bell, and try again. If you go too far, you'll get a weak ringing tone. Bend it back the other way till you hit the sweet spot.

                    A heavy duty bell may have a more direct action, with the clapper being the end of the solenoid itself. The above still applies, but with a slightly different geometry.

                    To slow down the ringing, clamp a weight onto the clapper so it has more inertia and each cycle takes longer. How well this works, and how sensitive it is to a clamped on weight depends on the angle of the clapper to the vertical.

                    At home, our bell has an external clapper. It is so loud that I have bent the clapper so it hardly touches the bell. It is quiet enough that white van man can't hear it, so it's buzz buzz, followed by them trying to bash the door down. Meybe I should readjust the clapper to work properly, and dampen the sound by muffling some of the bell by bolting some lumps of lead to it. It shouldn't ring loud after that treatment, and it shouldn't take more than half an hour.
                    Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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                    • #25
                      I'd think it would be easy to modify it to ring 60 times a second

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                      • #26
                        Hook it up to an old crank generator as found in antique phones. The faster you crank, the faster it rings.

                        https://www.ebay.com/itm/VTG-HAND-CR...R/133318622197

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                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #27
                          If you don't play T Rex Bang A Gong while working on it, you get dismal results..

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                          • #28
                            Just use a relay and feed the relay coil thru the normally closed contact on the same relay. When you energize it the relay will pick breaking it’s coil circuit repeatedly.

                            Years ago we had a 5 hp motor driven fire siren we thought would be good as a burglar alarm. Under test wearing good ear muffs we quit running it when we reached the point where your chest began to hurt!

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                            • #29
                              You can't make it too easy - otherwise it won't be worth "ringing"

                              so --- here's what you do - all mechanisms encased in plexiglass to amuse onlookers,,, you turn an Archimedes screw that lifts a series of steel balls to a higher destination above the bell, they sit there waiting to be used, when in the mood you pull a chain attached to a hinged door that releases the balls down a chute aimed directly at the outer parameter part of the bell, they do the ringing and get guided back down into the entrance gate of the pick up of the archimedes screw to start the process all over again,,,
                              oh yeah - there's an adjustable flap that slows the balls down out of the exit gate towards the bell separating them further apart, now you have a different ring tone, you can even get fancy and build a series of gate controls with different size steel balls to play a tune,,, there - now you have something to keep you busy the rest of your life lol

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                              • #30
                                Connect the coil to line voltage through a telegraph key so you can send messages in Morse code. If you need emergency assistance in the shop, you can send an SOS :

                                dingdingding Dong...Dong...Dong dingdingding
                                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                                USA Maryland 21030

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