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Is 1045 an acceptable gear material?

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  • #31
    Both good points - he's talking about catastrophic failure but if anything that would have happened between the sun gear's teeth and the planets --- sun is 32 tooth and planets are 24 and internal ring is 80 --- all teeth measurements also coincide with pitch diameter in millimeters...

    I think the relationship between the ring gear and the planets is stronger due to the increased contact area, so im not worried about too hard as I think I would have seen failure in the sun or planets - but I see increased wear in the ring, not only that --- I see the wear pushing the material out of the side of the ring (very slightly --- took a stoning to actually confirm it)

    so just wish the ring was as hard as the others because it's of course not,,,

    NCF that's good info --- are you talking ford axles that actually run their bearing surface right on the axle material itself? if that's the case I definitely don't need to worry about the material just getting it hard enough --- axles are tough stuff in my opinion and I would think plenty tough enough for what im needing in this application...

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    • #32
      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
      NCF that's good info --- are you talking ford axles that actually run their bearing surface right on the axle material itself? if that's the case I definitely don't need to worry about the material just getting it hard enough --- axles are tough stuff in my opinion and I would think plenty tough enough for what im needing in this application...
      The older full-size pickups in the junkyards. Doesn't matter if its ford or chevy. 3/4 or 1 ton (8-lug) axles will have the good stuff. If you can get a bent or broken shaft for cheap then I would go for it. Newer models are using chrome moly, I think 4140. When I upgraded my jeep axles I saved the old shafts because jeep used to use 1040 back then.

      A modern 1-ton shaft off a dually or something is almost 1-1/2" diameter chrome moly.

      The smaller axles that run directly on the bearing (like a car does) I dunno about but I would bet they used decent stuff for those too. I bet your supply of axle steel is OK for making small gears -- after all most axles have splines on them, and look what they go through!

      I also save old transmission shafts when I can get them, I'm always begging steel off mechanics LOL its a cheap n easy way to get it.
      Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-14-2020, 01:08 AM. Reason: sp, details

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      • #33
        Having been in the induction hardening biz for years, gears can be tricky. Note that with the chrome moly steels notably 4140 After hardening you must immediately temper it. If not, you'll get cracking.
        For the correct time and temps, go on line and look at or download the heat treaters guide from the ASM. There's also a free phone app for it.

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        • #34
          Like I said before from the heat treatment point of view 1045 steel is not the right material for big, complicated shape parts. 4140 steel is much better, it will harden deeper and will have much less deformation. Tempering is not a choice, but a necessity. One day you will regret for not doing it.

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          • #35
            If you are buying transmission parts, and they are not lasting, two things come to mind. First is clearance/tolerance, second is lubrication.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by I make chips View Post
              Having been in the induction hardening biz for years, gears can be tricky. Note that with the chrome moly steels notably 4140 After hardening you must immediately temper it. If not, you'll get cracking.
              Yep. I Induction hardened this one. Was playing around just to get a line on parameters, and forgot to temper it. Was working in the shop when it sounded like a small caliber gun shot occurred. I actually stopped what I was doing and went looking because I thought maybe something had fallen off a shelf, or something similar. ( there was something bouncing after the initial "pop". Never found out what it was. Until the next day. Happened to walk past this and saw the chunk missing. Part was feet away, on the other side of the room.





              Originally posted by I make chips View Post
              For the correct time and temps, go on line and look at or download the heat treaters guide from the ASM. There's also a free phone app for it.
              Good to know. Thanks. And completely not fair. Hurrumph! Some of us had to buy the book, years ago... The effer is EXPENSIVE! ( and worth every penny ) Going to look for the app now...



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              • #37
                Originally posted by I make chips View Post
                Having been in the induction hardening biz for years, gears can be tricky. Note that with the chrome moly steels notably 4140 After hardening you must immediately temper it. If not, you'll get cracking.
                For the correct time and temps, go on line and look at or download the heat treaters guide from the ASM. There's also a free phone app for it.
                What about with the 1045 that the OP is using? I imagine its a lot less critical since it won't harden as deep, or as hard. Hehehehe I use the Crucible catalog along with Machinery's Handbook for most everything.

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                • #38
                  Wow. Thank you, "I make chips". Sure as sh|te, I found it and installed it. I still value my texts very highly, but do appreciate how handy it is to have the info quite literally at one's fingertips, on the phone.

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