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  • #31
    Did you notice the way that just blipping the throttle a tiny bit when the tractor was stationary caused an instant kick in the opposite direction? There is something large rotating in there. There is no way that he could have floored the throttle without an instant crash, or driven it that fast without being totally familiar with the local roads.
    That bit of countryside could be in any number of places in the UK, I wonder where in the USA it is?

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    • #32
      Originally posted by old mart View Post
      Did you notice the way that just blipping the throttle a tiny bit when the tractor was stationary caused an instant kick in the opposite direction? There is something large rotating in there. There is no way that he could have floored the throttle without an instant crash, or driven it that fast without being totally familiar with the local roads.
      That bit of countryside could be in any number of places in the UK, I wonder where in the USA it is?
      Yep, a chevrolet (GM) big-block is rotating in there.. the crank alone weighs 60 lbs. 454 cubic inches. 7.4 liters. usually they were reserved for heavy working trucks or muscle cars in the 400+ HP range. Could be anywhere in the US but I'll take an educated guess that its somewhere in the midwest. Basically in the middle of the country -- out in the hearland of the farm land. There's almost a thousand miles of land like that in the middle of the US. Maybe more.
      Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-17-2020, 04:07 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by old mart View Post
        I wonder where in the USA it is?
        Anywhere in the Central or Midwest like Michigan
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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        • #34
          Originally posted by old mart View Post
          Did you notice the way that just blipping the throttle a tiny bit when the tractor was stationary caused an instant kick in the opposite direction? There is something large rotating in there. There is no way that he could have floored the throttle without an instant crash, or driven it that fast without being totally familiar with the local roads.

          Lot's of crazy factors going on with such a small platform connected to large rotating mass like you said --- but believe or not - as long as you don't turn the frame into a pretzel much of the forces are equalized on said platform, When you "gun it" in gear that is, the engine gets torsionally loaded in one direction against the frame work whilst the rear end gets loaded in the opposing direction against the framework,,,

          where you will notice the "rocking factor" the most is when you eliminate the drivetrain completely and have it in neutral and give it a quick rev,,, now it's all between the linear running pistons trying to accelerate the incredible crank AND flywheel mass in an instant, this has single directional effect on the platform, and it shows in the video, what exasperates the effect is when the engine reaches maximum RPM's and then starts to decelerate --- now the rocking goes back the other direction further than ever as the coasting mass tries to drag all those pistons along with it...

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          • #35
            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post


            Lot's of crazy factors going on with such a small platform connected to large rotating mass like you said --- but believe or not - as long as you don't turn the frame into a pretzel much of the forces are equalized on said platform, When you "gun it" in gear that is, the engine gets torsionally loaded in one direction against the frame work whilst the rear end gets loaded in the opposing direction against the framework,,,

            where you will notice the "rocking factor" the most is when you eliminate the drivetrain completely and have it in neutral and give it a quick rev,,, now it's all between the linear running pistons trying to accelerate the incredible crank AND flywheel mass in an instant, this has single directional effect on the platform, and it shows in the video, what exasperates the effect is when the engine reaches maximum RPM's and then starts to decelerate --- now the rocking goes back the other direction further than ever as the coasting mass tries to drag all those pistons along with it...


            Amen. The last time I built one of those engines in my misspent yoof, I weighed each part of the rotating and reciprocating assembly. Well over 120 lbs steel and aluminum trying to fly out of that engine block, not including the flywheel which was another 45 lbs....

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Willy View Post

              Yes indeed there are, see them all the time at at tractor pulls in the wilder side of garden tractor pullers that use everything from motorcycle engines to alcohol injected big block V-8s as a source of motivation.

              Vectorwarbirds' link led me to another V-8 powered lawn tractor, however this one is a bit more refined, buddy even has a nice looking lawn and yard.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0k6eVEBMH1M
              If you want to call a custom built frame with automotive V8, tranny, rear end, etc. and some tractor sheet metal stapled on, a "V-8 powered lawn tractor", well okay. Referencing the "more refined tractor" it's obvious that the only thing left of the original Massey-Ferguson 350 is the hood and front wheels. He could just as easily slapped a Power Wheels body on it. V8 powered Barbie's Dream Car! I assume T. Barkers is the same, just crappier looking. Makes me think of those six-figure "rat rods" you see on TV where they jack up and old car body and roll a custom built frame, engine and drive train under it. Don't get me wrong, it is entertaining.
              Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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              • #37
                Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post



                Amen. The last time I built one of those engines in my misspent yoof, I weighed each part of the rotating and reciprocating assembly. Well over 120 lbs steel and aluminum trying to fly out of that engine block, not including the flywheel which was another 45 lbs....
                So ---- linear actuating pistons, connected to rotational mass,,, who in the class can tell me why the engine block rocks upon free run acceleration? and yes every action has an opposing reaction ---- but exactly where is this taking place? first one gets a gold star lol

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

                  Don't get me wrong, it is entertaining.
                  And that is after all what it's all about.
                  None of this is anywhere close to qualifying for a Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance event.

                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #39
                    What is free run acceleration?
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                      So ---- linear actuating pistons, connected to rotational mass,,, who in the class can tell me why the engine block rocks upon free run acceleration? and yes every action has an opposing reaction ---- but exactly where is this taking place? first one gets a gold star lol
                      I would say that it rocks through the (imaginary) axis or centerline of the crank itself.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post
                        What is free run acceleration?
                        A neutral gunning it

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                          So ---- linear actuating pistons, connected to rotational mass,,, who in the class can tell me why the engine block rocks upon free run acceleration? and yes every action has an opposing reaction ---- but exactly where is this taking place? first one gets a gold star lol
                          The connecting rods don't move in a linear fashion.
                          Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                            I would say that it rocks through the (imaginary) axis or centerline of the crank itself.
                            This, the angular acceleration around a fixed axis will produce torque, the amount dependent on the moment of inertia and time.

                            No scientist here by any means. I believe this relates to Newton's second law, not his third.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

                              The connecting rods don't move in a linear fashion.
                              Bingo --- the top parts do but the bottom have to follow the crank throw, esp. at the 90 degree mark, to cut to the chase, it's the piston skirts (and basically entire opposing piston side) that have the influence on the blocks counter-rotation during a neutral rev...

                              Flathead gets a gold star --- look at the rods angle under power, NCF gets a silver star for taking a stab at it and Willy gets a bronze for asking a question --- everyone else gets a copper star because their are no losers only winners --- your all winners even if you finished in last place nobody loses and everyone is special

                              (god id hate to be a teacher nowadays lol)

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                                Bingo --- the top parts do but the bottom have to follow the crank throw, esp. at the 90 degree mark, to cut to the chase, it's the piston skirts (and basically entire opposing piston side) that have the influence on the blocks counter-rotation during a neutral rev...

                                Flathead gets a gold star --- look at the rods angle under power, NCF gets a silver star for taking a stab at it and Willy gets a bronze for asking a question --- everyone else gets a copper star because their are no losers only winners --- your all winners even if you finished in last place nobody loses and everyone is special

                                (god id hate to be a teacher nowadays lol)
                                And the Wankel engine uses the shape of the combustion chamber and rotor to convert the linear expansion of gas to angular motion. Then there is the water wheel. I guess all machines that convert linear motion to angular are basically water wheels.
                                Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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