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  • Tim The Grim
    replied
    I shared a house with three pals from high school on a country lane in ‘76. One guy had an Imp that was no longer roadworthy.
    We drained the oil and parked it out front. He put a brick on the gas pedal. After 45 minutes at full throttle with no oil we got bored and one of the guys remembered I had a tube of dry TC lapping grit. We put that in with a half cup or so of oil and the noises and smoke started soon after. It just gradually slowed down and seized up a few minutes later.
    That Hillman had one tough motor that gained our respect.

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  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    Originally posted by darryl View Post
    A guy on a bike pulled into our restaurant one day for a coffee. His bike was not flashy, or well appointed or anything- what you did notice is that it was basically a V-8 with a tranny, with an extension off the front for the front wheel and handlebars, and an extension off the back for the rear wheel. I'm sure there was frame, but the thing was all engine. Dad was asking him about it, and asked what would happen if you gunned it. The guy said 'oh, it would just flip right over'. When he left we were all watching of course- there was no gunning it, just a smooth takeoff with the rumbling engine sounding like it was idling. Never saw anything like it again.

    Those were the days when an ElectroGlide was the biggest thing you ever saw on two wheels. 45s and 74s were all over the place, Nortons, Triumphs, BSAs, Indians, other classic bikes were always in our parking lot. Some days it looked like a dealership.

    Talking about putting a big engine in a small vehicle- one of our regulars had a 283 stuffed into a Hillman. This car originally came with an 8 hp engine.
    Ya, I had a Hillman that I paid $9.00 for, in 1970. It was a 1957 Minx. It had about 40 horsepower I think. Way overpowered for the suspension, and even more so for the brakes.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    And as a bonus that's why pistons have a major and minor thrust side.
    Has to be a major contributor to a conventional engines parasitic drag,,, I wonder if you built two identical displacement air engines and ran them on the same PSI which one would make more power --- conventional or "rocker cylinder" ? rocker cylinder eliminates the side thrust factor and is more direct, although im sure it's got it's own host of problems;



    https://youtu.be/-WVQqNSX7LM

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  • darryl
    replied
    A guy on a bike pulled into our restaurant one day for a coffee. His bike was not flashy, or well appointed or anything- what you did notice is that it was basically a V-8 with a tranny, with an extension off the front for the front wheel and handlebars, and an extension off the back for the rear wheel. I'm sure there was frame, but the thing was all engine. Dad was asking him about it, and asked what would happen if you gunned it. The guy said 'oh, it would just flip right over'. When he left we were all watching of course- there was no gunning it, just a smooth takeoff with the rumbling engine sounding like it was idling. Never saw anything like it again.

    Those were the days when an ElectroGlide was the biggest thing you ever saw on two wheels. 45s and 74s were all over the place, Nortons, Triumphs, BSAs, Indians, other classic bikes were always in our parking lot. Some days it looked like a dealership.

    Talking about putting a big engine in a small vehicle- one of our regulars had a 283 stuffed into a Hillman. This car originally came with an 8 hp engine.
    Last edited by darryl; 02-18-2020, 08:55 PM.

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  • 754
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    across the valve covers, about 30 inches. Similar to any other GM big block. IIRC the Cadillac motors were the widest.
    How about a W 30 Olds or a nailhead Buick.?
    Last edited by 754; 02-18-2020, 06:27 PM.

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  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    across the valve covers, about 30 inches. Similar to any other GM big block. IIRC the Cadillac motors were the widest.
    That's about what I thought, my 350 is about 20". So how is it shoe-horned completely under the hood of that tractor? For scale, look at the steering wheel.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
    How wide is a 454?
    across the valve covers, about 30 inches. Similar to any other GM big block. IIRC the Cadillac motors were the widest.

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  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    How wide is a 454?

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

    Try electricity for invidible magic wand

    unmounted 3-phase motor accelerates the frame to 500rpm easily.. until It leaves the workshop
    Your "Prying" off of either field windings or perm mags,,,,,,, if your rotating a rotor then you better have your stator mounted to something other than air




    You could mount two identical electric or gas engines/motors together that share the same block/casing and rotate them in opposite directions --- then a free run rev has no torsional effect as they both would cancel each other out....
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 02-18-2020, 03:28 PM.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    you cannot have one without the other ---- first off you cannot have the internal mass just decide to "take off on it's own" and if you could waive a magic wand to do so then there's no opposing reaction,,, the energies driving the crankshaft come from the combustion chamber gasses pressing down on top of the piston, the piston then drives the rods which have to get on an angle in order to drive the off-set crank throw,,, when the piston tries to accelerate the mass of the crank and flywheel the side of the piston is tossed into the block adjacent to where the crank throw is, the piston "pry's" off of the block during it's linear movement and not only accelerates the crank and flywheel but torsionally rotates the block in the opposing .
    Try electricity for invidible magic wand

    unmounted 3-phase motor accelerates the frame to 500rpm easily.. until It leaves the workshop

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

    And the Wankel engine uses the shape of the combustion chamber and rotor to convert the linear expansion of gas to angular motion. Then there is the water wheel. I guess all machines that convert linear motion to angular are basically water wheels.
    You could say its just another way to shove on the end of a lever...

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

    You can remove the pistons and connecting rods and it still jerks on acceleration..
    Angular acceleration or rotating mass accelerating (crackshaft) is the culprit.
    you cannot have one without the other ---- first off you cannot have the internal mass just decide to "take off on it's own" and if you could waive a magic wand to do so then there's no opposing reaction,,, the energies driving the crankshaft come from the combustion chamber gasses pressing down on top of the piston, the piston then drives the rods which have to get on an angle in order to drive the off-set crank throw,,, when the piston tries to accelerate the mass of the crank and flywheel the side of the piston is tossed into the block adjacent to where the crank throw is, the piston "pry's" off of the block during it's linear movement and not only accelerates the crank and flywheel but torsionally rotates the block in the opposing direction...


    Btw: BMW uses contra-rotating flywheel on lognitudal mounted motorcycle engines. Crankshaft is also wild looking on some models
    https://images.app.goo.gl/8TXsx2Svv3QCrQp2A

    power take-off to clutch/flywheel is between cylinders 2 and 3 in the inline-6


    Interesting - I will take a look at it ---the old BMW's and gold wings are examples of this effect --- iv worked on a ton of them and would always get a little rock when giving a rev from idle...

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

    Bingo --- the top parts do but the bottom have to follow the crank throw, esp. at the 90 degree mark, to cut to the chase, it's the piston skirts (and basically entire opposing piston side) that have the influence on the blocks counter-rotation during a neutral rev...

    Flathead gets a gold star --- look at the rods angle under power, NCF gets a silver star for taking a stab at it and Willy gets a bronze for asking a question --- everyone else gets a copper star because their are no losers only winners --- your all winners even if you finished in last place nobody loses and everyone is special

    (god id hate to be a teacher nowadays lol)
    You can remove the pistons and connecting rods and it still jerks on acceleration..
    Angular acceleration or rotating mass accelerating (crackshaft) is the culprit.

    Btw: BMW uses contra-rotating flywheel on lognitudal mounted motorcycle engines. Crankshaft is also wild looking on some models
    https://images.app.goo.gl/8TXsx2Svv3QCrQp2A

    power take-off to clutch/flywheel is between cylinders 2 and 3 in the inline-6
    Last edited by MattiJ; 02-18-2020, 02:49 PM.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

    And the Wankel engine uses the shape of the combustion chamber and rotor to convert the linear expansion of gas to angular motion. Then there is the water wheel. I guess all machines that convert linear motion to angular are basically water wheels.
    I should correct my statement a little and i'll add to it with capital letters;

    it's the piston skirts (and basically entire opposing piston side) that have the FINAL SAY IN THE influence on the blocks counter-rotation during a neutral rev...

    the piston skirts are not the reason --- but the last link in the connection to the prime mover of it all.... and they physically "impulse rotate" the mass of the block in doing so...

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Good point Willy - and for adding to it you now get a silver star, and no you don't get to call in a "snow day" --- your whole life has been a "day off" lol (just kidding dude)

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