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Annoying slivers

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  • Ringo
    replied
    I use eye magnifiers and a razor blade

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    I would guess that most of us people that work with their hands get slivers but metal workers, especially those that do milling, get the really small metal slivers in our fingers. Any idea what is a good way to get them out .
    Ouch. No, I don't. Like Cactus. Dont touch it.. JR



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  • ezduzit
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Stereo zoom microscope...
    This is an invaluable aid to any machinist, and for much more than just removing slivers.

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  • Alan Smith
    replied
    Not surprised this is a popular topic, it affects us all.
    My take on it is to grab the splinter as soon as you first feel it before it gets too far in. I keep a pair of eyelash tweezers stuck on a super magnet on my tool chest lid so I can grab them almost without looking. I lapped the tips with 2000 wet and dry so they meet dead flat and dead square.

    For me however the worst thing is not the metal splinters but under the bark of larch wood which we grow here and use a lot of for fuel and lumber, are lots of loose little short sharp fibres. If you're not careful handling the seasoned logs you will get hundreds of these stuck in your hands, usually between your fingers. The most bizarre thing is that they don't seem to affect my wife's hands with her soft skin! Work that out.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    .....
    But for the rare occasion I do keep a good pair of tweezers and a nail clipper on hand along with my 10X Optivisor.
    .......

    JL.........................
    Yeah, nail clipper works well also. Dual purpose, does the excavating, and then pulls the uncovered splinter.

    Not as good for stuff like cactus spines from the houseplant sized variety, and from the small yellow and red flowered prickly pear that grows in the woods all over (Opuntia). Ok for things that do not cut easily, wood splinters, metal shavings, etc.

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Been a while since I've had to, buta bit of rubber cement or similar over the are, let it dry and rip it off usually grabs the sliver.

    For obvious reasons, avoid any hair

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    I must be doing something wrong, I hardly ever get any of those splinters you guys are talking about. I don't run my fingers through the swarf or clean out the T slots of the mill with my fingers.
    But for the rare occasion I do keep a good pair of tweezers and a nail clipper on hand along with my 10X Optivisor.
    Actually I've gotten more of those fine splinters when filing.

    JL.........................
    Last edited by JoeLee; 02-19-2020, 11:32 PM. Reason: Because I felt like it !

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  • jcfx
    replied
    Rare earth magnets also work if the slivers are steel, aluminum it's all of the above suggestions.

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    A couple years ago I spent months working on some steel embossing dies for a company in Europe. Those steel slivers were absolutely horrible, and I never was able to keep from having them in my hands. On a good day I atleast didn't scratch my neck or my nose and transfer those tiny steel cholla barbs to more tender areas. I never found a good solution. I was just miserable the whole time. Oddly, I've been doing some work lately with the same steel (leftovers from that job) making tools and parts, and I'm not generating those kinds of chips for some reason. I really am not sure what I am doing differently.

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    I can usually get most out with tweezers, but sometimes bust out a scriber, knife, scalpel or other sharp object to hack and dig away at it. Sometimes they just break off, and eventually work their way out. Probably have no less than 5 in my hands right now.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    I have used "liquid bandage". It dries pretty fast, and usually peels off OK. Meanwhile, it keeps the little bustards from tunneling in farther.

    I can see Elmer's being better, it does not stick to skin as well.

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  • rickyb
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Stereo zoom microscope with a sharp exacto knife and dumount fine tip watchmakers tweezers. Its so good, makes me want to ad surgery to the list of hobbies
    Yep, I do exactly the same as you. Only way to get the magnification to see those tiny ones in the 1 thou range.

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  • RetiredFAE
    replied
    I have used all the above methods, and one more, a drop of Elmers glue over the sliver, spread it out a bit, let it dry for an hour or so and then scrape it off with the edge of a sharp knife held perpendicular to the surface of the area. Glue grabs the sliver when nothing else seems to catch on it, and helps pull it out. Super glue works too, but the Elmers seems to get a better grip most of the time.

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Magnesium sulphate paste, known as 'drawing ointment' applied in a poultice will get out splinters and rose thorns when the've gone in too far to seen, but you know they are there.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I use a good magnifier to see them. I have a Hastings 10X triplet in my pocket at all times. Squeezing the finger can help to bring them further out: this works both for finding them and when trying to grab them with the tweezers. A third hand helps a lot.

    For removal tools I use tweezers that I have sharpened. I have never found a pair in the stores that are the least bit sharp. They may grab a great big wood splinter, but are useless on the small metal ones. I also use an X-Acto knife with a #11 blade. A bit of self surgery. Everything cleaned with alcohol before use; including the finger.

    For the invisible ones I drag my fingernail across the area, first one way and then at 90° to that first direction. I am looking for the greatest pain. If I already have the knife out, I may use it for finding the invisible ones: drag it instead of the fingernail.

    I need to try that sandpaper trick.

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