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Swaging Wire Rope or Cable

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  • Swaging Wire Rope or Cable

    I have a home built 12-24T press. I want to build an attachment to swage aluminum sleeves onto wire rope to form eyes. Youtube is helpful, but gives no details as to shape. "Machinerys Handbook" is mum.

    1/4" wire rope as found at Ace Hardware. Needed for pulling and lifting (not overhead) of things I make or use.

    1. What is the needed shape of the upper and lower channels?
    2. What size?
    3. How do I determine the stop point?

    Would I be better to stick to chain and braided nylon 3/4" rope?

  • #2
    It's tricky. The aluminum alloy and temper is important, so is everything else. It's kind of a case of copying what works, and testing, or else testing your own design until you have consistent results where you need them.

    Might be much easier to just use Crosby clips, or a commercial crimper, or possibly, as you suggest, use chain.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      If you have bought the aluminium tubular, or figure of eight ready made for the 1/4" wire, and don't have a commercially swaged example to copy, then trial and error will get you by. If worried, you can swage two of the ferrules in tandem. As I recall, the depth of swage on joints this size would be about 30% of the ferrule wall thickness.

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      • #4
        By a sheer luck this topic was covered just few days ago on another(Finnish) forum. Talurit is sort of de-facto standard at least around here for cable swaging and I was able to find following information: https://www.bridco.com.au/pdf/Talurit.pdf

        Gives you gage dimension of the finished crimp and estimated tonnage. US cable sleeves could be with different dimensions but if you calculate by fill factor you should get close.
        Needed force is pretty substantial, 1/4" wire rope with aluminium ferrule = ~21 metric tonnes, 23 US short ton

        edit: Talurit system end result is round in shape
        Last edited by MattiJ; 02-20-2020, 12:29 PM.

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        • #5
          Your question made me do a general web search for "cable swaging tool" then click on the "images". There's a number of hand tools and it appears from various pictures that the jaws use a half circle on each side and fit the "figure 8" swages into the round jaws then clamp down to form the swaged joint. As for how much to press the joiners perhaps look at some cable ends on cable hoists or come-alongs on the store shelves?

          I've got a ratchet style cable lift I've used for many years. It's OK but I only like it because the cable fits neatly around the reel. If your goal is to use separate free lengths of it to wrap around things then cable is not your friend. You need to avoid bending and kinking it or it'll start breaking strands very quickly. Far better for that sort of use to use chain or heavy lift straps or the braided rope. Plus free lengths of cable have a nasty mind of their own on where they leap to when least expecting it. Again great when coiled on a drum or pulling in a straight line onto a drum but not so great at using it to wrap around anything.

          Perhaps I'm reading into your intent wrongly? But why would you need the crimpers if not to make up free lengths of the stuff? Perhaps let us know a little more on your intended application?
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            This was "medium range" micromet... cable swaging tool from Talurit:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uymR...ture=emb_title

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            • #7
              For small wire rope like that it doesn't cost much to have ends swaged on. Have it done professionally and
              the safety issues go away...
              Keith
              __________________________
              Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                For small wire rope like that it doesn't cost much to have ends swaged on. Have it done professionally and
                the safety issues go away...
                Best idea. There's a crane repair/supply two miles away. They swage cables up to 1-1/2" thick. Of course, they will be pricey.

                Using chain for predictability and manageability also good. Lots more you can do with chain.

                Like the Country song, "What was I THINKING?"

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                • #9
                  I used to build tooling and do production setups for a cable manufacturer and I don’t ever remember us using aluminum fittings. Stainless, zinc plated carbon steel and brass are what I remember working with.
                  I’m thinking that potential galvanic action in moist environments makes the aluminum less desirable.

                  We did anything from tiny computer printer cables to Automotive Lift safety cables that had to hold up a pull test to 18,000 lbs. When one of those let loose on the test machine it was as loud as a 12 gauge.
                  Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                  9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tim The Grim View Post
                    I used to build tooling and do production setups for a cable manufacturer and I don’t ever remember us using aluminum fittings. Stainless, zinc plated carbon steel and brass are what I remember working with.
                    I’m thinking that potential galvanic action in moist environments makes the aluminum less desirable.

                    We did anything from tiny computer printer cables to Automotive Lift safety cables that had to hold up a pull test to 18,000 lbs. When one of those let loose on the test machine it was as loud as a 12 gauge.
                    Monster sizes appear to be be often aluminium. PDF I posted goes only up to 60mm or abouts 2½" diameter but even aluminium ferrule needs 1800 ton press at that size.
                    I can only imagine what 4" steel ferrule would need .. 15 000 tons or so

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                    • #11
                      Lifting strops are pretty cheap, and amazingly strong. They also go around corners without complaint, as long as the corners don't have sharp edges. Wire rope is horrible stuff to handle.

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                      • #12
                        I believe Menard's sells crimp sleeves and crimping tools. I know they go to 3/16". Not sure about 1/4".
                        You could do a Flemish eye splice and just use a crimp sleeve on the tail.

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                        • #13
                          Hardware stores have these yellow truck tie down straps with ridiculous tensile strength. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Vestil-R...7-RH/303100285 6800 lbs.

                          Think I'll go with them. I have a sewing kit for making eyes in 3/4" dock line, and that would be perfect for making custom lifting straps. I think maybe going with wire not such a good idea after all.

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                          • #14
                            So I was right in thinking that you wanted the wire cable for wrapping around things. A combination of chain and cargo strapping will be WAY better. Not to mention that it does not take a whole lot of abuse with wire to cause broken strands that love to dig into exposed flesh.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #15
                              I have a simple 5 stage clamp I use. I could take a picture of both sides with scales for relation if you want? The clamp is made by the manufactures of the wire clamps. JR

                              Edit: Thats what they are called, couldnt remember. nicopress.
                              Last edited by JRouche; 02-21-2020, 08:17 PM.
                              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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