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  • #46
    Originally posted by OaklandGB View Post
    Flat earth theory: So if I dig a hole to the opposite side of the flat earth and fall into it, won't I pop out on the opposite side, only then to fall back into that hole, then to repeat this falling over and over and over? How do I miss all the crude oil and magma on my way through?
    Gravity only pulls one way. If you dug a hole to the opposite side, you would fall into oblivion.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Ringo View Post
      I wonder if he realized his parachute was deployed on the launch.?
      he may have time to think about it all the way
      Definitely an "Oh Sh--" moment
      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

      Lewis Grizzard

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Ringo View Post
        I wonder if he realized his parachute was deployed on the launch.?
        he may have time to think about it all the way
        Im thinking he felt the drag for as long as the chute was attached but probably thought it was not drag just low power output for a brief second, thought pattern something like this;

        "Hmmmfph - something must have been obstructing the steam nozzle jet, I told that kid to strain the water first before putting it in the main tank, damn, ohhh there it goes -- must have dislodged it, back to full power now, smooooth sailin - welp - seen all there is to see up here to make a good assessment, the people of the world will no longer be living in the dark - the earth is indeed flat, time to head back down - don't want to be late for lunch, i'll just deploy the chute now, hey, why isn't the chute deploying!!!! hey!!! this is getting serious - no longer a view of the blue sky -- HEY WTF !!! that damn kid never should have let him pack the chu ------------ Oh FU--.................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ..............................."

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        • #49
          Gravity inside an idealized (i.e. uniform density) spherical earth provides some interesting physics.

          First, gravitational attraction inside a thin spherical shell produces no net force on a particle inside the shell (proof left as calculus exercise for the student). You can use this fact that gravity inside the earth is a linear function of distance from the center, not an R^-2 force. As with a linear spring force, an object dropped into a hole through the uniform earth will oscillate back and forth as if attached to a spring at the center of the earth.

          Moreover, the period of this oscillation is constant for all hole start and end points; the hole does not need to go through the center. So in this idealized version of reality, subway systems could be built through the earth and the travel time between any two cities would be the same.
          Regards, Marv

          Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
          http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

          Location: LA, CA, USA

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          • #50
            Originally posted by mklotz View Post

            Moreover, the period of this oscillation is constant for all hole start and end points; the hole does not need to go through the center. So in this idealized version of reality, subway systems could be built through the earth and the travel time between any two cities would be the same.
            One important observation to add "in a vacuum"

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            • #51
              The earth is actually not quite spherical - its circumference at the equator is greater than that across the poles, due to centripetal force of rotation. AIUI this means that gravity is stronger there than at the poles. But that effect may be somewhat counteracted by the centripetal force trying to throw people, and other objects, into space. If the earth's circumference is 24,000 miles, and rotates every 24 hours, the surface velocity is about 1000 MPH, faster than the speed of sound, but the atmosphere also is rotating at the same speed.

              The escape velocity is about 25,000 MPH, at which the centripetal force equals the force of gravity. Thus, I would expect objects to weigh 4% less at the equator. So you overweight far north denizens can lose a few pounds by taking a trip to the tropics...

              There are people who believe in a "hollow earth" with entry holes at the poles.
              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
              USA Maryland 21030

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              • #52
                What about a dodecahedron Still basically a ball but also flat on all sides. Works for everyone.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                • #53
                  Well, gosh, if gravity is stronger at the equator, does that mean we all lose weight on a trip to North Pole?

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                  • #54
                    I think the centripetal force effect is stronger than the actual change in gravitational constant. Or perhaps more correctly, the force of gravity, or gravitational acceleration. The Gravity of Earth varies by about 0.7%, whereas the centripetal acceleration may account for as much as a 5% lower weight at the equator as measured by a spring scale, load cell, or accelerometer. A balance would show your correct mass independent of acceleration.

                    What I said above may not be totally correct. I based my estimation of the effect of centrifugal (not centripetal) force on the escape velocity as compared to the surface velocity of the earth at the equator. Actually, according to the Wiki, the equatorial bulge actually reduces the force of gravity due to the greater radius to the center of mass, and the effect of centrifugal force, combine to cause a "weight loss" of only about 0.5% at the equator.
                    Last edited by PStechPaul; 02-25-2020, 10:19 PM.
                    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                    USA Maryland 21030

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