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Flywheel with integrated fan

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  • Flywheel with integrated fan

    I wish I could build a flywheel like this. The flywheel would revolve clockwise. Air on the far side of the flywheel would be pulled thru the angled holes and blow onto the air cooled cylinder on the near side of the flywheel---I think. Looks like it would be a job for cnc. Might be kind of a pig to build with manual machines. The flywheel shown is 6" diameter made of steel or brass.
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Drill bit and a rotary table mounted at a angle should do the trick. Not sure if it would "scoop" air and operate like a fan though.

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    • #3
      It would work, but not nearly well enough for a cooling fan.

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      • #4
        I suppose you could build a center hub, then set it up and gash it 8 places at 45 degrees, then solder in the blades, then trim the end of the blades and solder on the outer rim. Be a lot of work, but gives a pretty end result. If you google "Dale Dietrich engine youtube" you can see where he has made a four cylinder engine with that style of flywheel. The mass of the hub and outer rim would suck up an awful lot of heat before the solder would flow. Maybe Dale made his from steel and then tig welded it together. tig is very easy to control. My A.C. welder and mig welder would get it done but would leave some big ugly welds.
        Last edited by brian Rupnow; 02-23-2020, 11:15 AM.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #5
          Dunno about a fan, but with some modification to the through holes, you would have a start on a turbine....
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
            Dunno about a fan, but with some modification to the through holes, you would have a start on a turbine....
            I was thinking same thing --- the current holes do not take advantage of centrifugal force so not much initiative for the air pockets to do much --- this would complicate things some but not really all that much, you would have to add yet another angle to the holes - on the intake side you would want the holes more towards the middle - on the output side all the way towards the edge, still keep your original sideways angle too - now put two flanges on both the intake and output outer hole areas, this would pump some air for sure - don't think it would be anything close to Brains multi piece design but allot less effort to build...

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            • #7
              That could also be easily done on a knee mill, just tram the head as needed with the knuckle design.

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              • #8
                Brian -- could you modify the pulley from an air compressor to suit? I've seen them cast with fan blades in them like that.

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                • #9
                  I do keep thinking about buying a TIG welder set-up. I went to my local welding gas supply company, and they will sell me a tig for about $1500 plus tax. I do love this hobby, and there is a lot of really neat stuff I could do with a tig. Other side of that coin is that I'm 73 years old. I already have AC stick welder and mig welder and oxy acetylene.
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    You could oxy-acetylene braze or silver solder that bladed version fairly easily. And for the forces at work I would expect that you'd want it silver soldered or brazed over regular solder. Regular would tolerate idle and lower speeds just fine. But I'd worry over giving any blips of higher RPM.

                    I'm also thinking that you could make an inner bladed disc in one piece and then join it to an outer ring. Something like my non fancy 2D setup below? I'd still want to silver solder the joints but if the blade hub is left room temperature and the outer ring is heated to nearly glowing and dropped over the blades on a jig of some form you should be able to finish the job with some silver soldering with the oxy acetylene? And yeah, I know the size shown at the root of the blades is less than 1/2". But the passes at an angle will leave more than a 1/2" wide swath.

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	airfoil spoked flywheel core.jpg
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ID:	1857260
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Having a nice TIG welder would be great, Brian, but to get the best out of one, some proper tuition would be greatly helpful. Age is no factor at all if you feel fit enough.

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                      • #12
                        This got me started thinking about how to do this from a single solid disc as well. Hopefully this is clear enough?

                        If the disc and fixturing is angled so the radial passes to form the blades are made using the longitudinal axis it would be pretty easy to set up the travel limit stops for the MANY radial passes needed.

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	airfoil spoked flywheel from one disc.jpg Views:	0 Size:	48.1 KB ID:	1857270
                        Last edited by BCRider; 02-23-2020, 01:06 PM.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Is your "AC welder" AC only output or AC/DC? I ask, because if it's AC/DC, then all you need is a TIG torch, flowmeter and a bottle of Argon. You can do a scratch start TIG for most ferrous metals with nothing more than that. A dedicated TIG power supply isn't really needed.

                          A scratch start setup will not have the fine versatility of a fancier unit, such as a foot throttle pedal, but it will function.

                          Do a search on Goggle for scratch start tig and you should get several hits.
                          Last edited by Bluechips; 02-23-2020, 01:16 PM.

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                          • #14
                            ok, what I missing.....what about the first picture one causes the consternation? The holes are straight, ie. not a taper or curve? It looks like an easy machine job and about 20x faster that built up. Tilt the dividing head, or put a spin indexer on an angle (i.e adjustable angle plate, or just held in the vise) or angle the head of the mill. With the blank done, it doesn't look like more than 1/2 hours work....6" diam? ok maybe an hour as it is a big larger than I first assumed
                            .

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                            • #15
                              I'm thinking that there might be some air movement from just the angled holes. Just not a whole lot due to the small holes and "super thick blades". And at low RPM like on an idling engine for the "putt-putt" sound almost certainly not enough to give it the proper cooling.

                              It's something that could be easily made in plywood using an angled holder and some forstner bits then spun using a hand drill to test it.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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