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  • 30 cylinder chrysler engine

    Check this http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/chrypen.html

    Now I understand why Chrysler didn't do to well. Only 445 HP from all those cubic inches. I wonder how many gallons per mile it got

  • #2
    Here's a 28,470 cu. in. two strokeGM engine.
    http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/gm16358.html
    About 8 cu. in. per HP
    Low speed, I need this for powering my new (old) lathe

    [This message has been edited by yf (edited 12-10-2002).]

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    • #3
      If you think thats interesting do a search on Deltic engines. Napiar and English Electric 18-cylinder opposed piston, three crankshafts.
      Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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      • #4
        The chrysler set says it used one starter? must be a big hummer.

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        • #5
          Remember trying to start those old Chrysler flathead sixes on a foggy morning?
          Wonder what x 6 was like.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            Here's my favourite:-

            http://www.eagle.ca/~harry/aircraft/tempest/sabre/

            Saw (and heard) one of these, with my dad who was ex aircraftman, at an air show in the mid fifties. The thought of the sound still raises the hairs on the back of my neck.

            Just check out the power and speed of this engine ~ 3,000HP and 4,000rpm on emergency overboost, for a 32litre H 24 engine.

            BTW, Spin Doctor ~ the Deltic was a development of the sabre in an obscure sort of way. There is a great book on Oddball engines by LJK Setright. I'll dig it off the shelf tonight and get the info on it ~ if you like engines this is the book to get a hold of!

            RR

            Edit note: don't you just hate it when you don't proof read before posting!

            [This message has been edited by Ragarsed Raglan (edited 12-11-2002).]

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            • #7
              RR - I have been trying to find a copy of the Setright book for years. If you have one and can provide exact coordinates - title, publisher, ISBN number - I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
              JCA
              [email protected]

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              • #8
                Possibly a bit rich in terms of price but i found this doing a web search.
                I have this book and whilst being good I don't think it's worth this much.

                1. Setright, LJK
                SOME UNUSUAL ENGINES
                1979 Mechanical Engineering Publications Limited, London Secon impression. Some slight wrinkling on the front paste-down and first 6 pages o/w a very good copy - VG/VG+ ISBN: 0-85298-208-9 Keywords: automotive, engines (jr). Bookseller Inventory #7414
                Price: US$ 175.00 (Convert Currency)
                Bookseller: A. David Gavitt, Bookseller
                Contact: David Gavitt
                Address: 84 Crestview Drive, Jaffrey, NH, U.S.A., 03452
                Homepage: www.abebooks.com/home/ADAVID
                E-mail: [email protected]
                Phone #: 603-532-6156
                Fax #: 603-532-7120

                John S.
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                • #9
                  Seeing as How both Napier and Bristol seemed to love these contraptions i'm not suprised to be reminded about the Sabre. The weird thing about the Deltics is the Crank layout. Durring WWII Norton(?) gringers that were supposed to go to Packard to manufacture Merlins were diverted to Napier for Sabre production. Book called Engines the Search for Power has a great cutaway of the Sabre even if they call it R-R Eagle. Another good source for piston aero engine info is Allied Piston Engines of WWII. Also Axis Piston Engines of WWII. What is about the British, always finding solutions to problems that dont really exist. Another H layout designed by the British is the BRM H-16 formula one engine of the early 60's. 1.5 liters at that.
                  Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey SpinDoctor,

                    You wouldn't have had Mulberry 'A' for the Normandy invasion had it not been for a British Army Royal Engineers Captain, who invented it (much to the chagrin of the Royal Navy!). Apparently the American Army laughed at the idea, but it did deliver 6 million tons of supplies to the Allied armies from D Day +2 up until November '44 when Antwerp port was liberated.

                    BTW Mulberry 'A' at Omaha beach was wrecked by storms after 2 weeks of operations. Mulberry 'B', at Arromanches, survived the storms and was the only dock capable of supply. Today the loading / unloading methods used in the Mulberry harbour has been adopted world wide for Roll on - Roll Off ferry operations.

                    Its no good inventing something that anybody could invent, it's got to be mindbogglingly great to stand half a chance of being accepted here! Like your example of the H16 BRM - the contempory V16 Coventry Climax had to have a method of assembly and disassembly for the two piece crank invented separately!

                    I fully endorse your choice of books for any engine phreaks. Anyone got a spare copy of 'Cold Blue Sky' an account of a B17 waist gunner? 'bin looking for it but seems to have recently gone OOP.

                    RR

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                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Ragarsed Raglan:
                      Anyone got a spare copy of 'Cold Blue Sky' an account of a B17 waist gunner? 'bin looking for it but seems to have recently gone OOP.
                      RR
                      </font>
                      RR, no published email address.
                      Drop me a line at [email protected]
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #12

                        Raglan:
                        Don't forget the catapult for a/c carriers. That's a brit invention.


                        Sleeve valves have always puzzled me. seem to be heavier, more complex in a way, and less intuitive than poppets. Also lots of wear points, a fact indicated in the link on the sabre.

                        Just why would anyone use them?

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                        • #13
                          No knock on Brit engineering skill and ability. After all until the past few years if you wanted printing presses thats where you went. Its just the excentricity of some of the stuff they come up with. The Mulberry was an absolutely inspired piece of engineering. The main reason that the one at Omaha was destroyed in the June storms was that the US engineers didn't use sufficient anchors and those were the key element in the whole design. Merlin V-12, absolutely one of the four best piston aircraft engines of the Second World War. Along with the Damilar Benz inverted V-12, the BMW radial and the P&W R2800
                          Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                          • #14
                            And lets not forget the Whittle engine that Churchill gave to the US. Basically every F1 chassis but Ferarri, the Cosworth V-8 etc. But you know why the English drink warm beer? Because they've got Lucas refridgerators. While back Car & Driver(?) did a comparison of thre Honda Accords. US, Japanese and Brit assembled. No discernable difference in build quality, handling, acceleration or braking. The Brit assembled one stood out because the electrical system was decidely different.
                            Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                            • #15
                              Whats three letters best describe a love/hate relationship?

                              BSA


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