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Sandblasting Cabinet Round Two: VacuBlast

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  • Excellent
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
    Well a few updates from the weekend. I need to replace a bunch of rubber and foam gaskets. Not too surprising given the age. Also, the siphon hose has a huge hold worn through it where it makes a bend - also not too surprising but it sparks the question: just what is the siphon hose made out of? It looks and feels a lot like ordinary, clear vinyl hose.

    Also, the current setup uses a 3/4" ID siphon hose about 8' feet long. If I replace the gun with one of those Clemco Zero Blast versions, the siphon hose fitting is for a 1/2" ID tube. I imagine anywhere I decrease diameter is going to be a substantial wear point. Do I keep the siphon hose 3/4" ID and put a reducing adapter just before the gun or do I replace the whole length of hose with smaller diameter hose?
    Clear braided vinyl hose is fairly standard for that application. It's helpful to see if your media is getting sucked up and how efficiently, but it is ultimately a perishable part. Even the big thick rubber hoses on blast pots wear through eventually, and usually at the end with the nozzle on it, as that's the bit that's stressed most by being bent and waved about by the blaster. It's not an awful lot of fun when that happens.

    As for sizing the pickup tube, it depends on what pressure/flow you want to maintain, and consequentially what pressure/CFM your compressor can sustain. Since the Clemco style gun is likely to be more efficient than what you have, coupling that with a reduction in hose ID might give you a much more efficient setup. Increased flow is a good thing, as is a metering valve of sorts to regulate how much air gets mixed in with the siphoned grit. I made a banjo-type bolt for this but in the end just left it out and went with maximum. Too many variables to really give you a definite answer but I think the smaller ID on the pickup will be more efficient.

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Well a few updates from the weekend. I need to replace a bunch of rubber and foam gaskets. Not too surprising given the age. Also, the siphon hose has a huge hold worn through it where it makes a bend - also not too surprising but it sparks the question: just what is the siphon hose made out of? It looks and feels a lot like ordinary, clear vinyl hose.

    Also, the current setup uses a 3/4" ID siphon hose about 8' feet long. If I replace the gun with one of those Clemco Zero Blast versions, the siphon hose fitting is for a 1/2" ID tube. I imagine anywhere I decrease diameter is going to be a substantial wear point. Do I keep the siphon hose 3/4" ID and put a reducing adapter just before the gun or do I replace the whole length of hose with smaller diameter hose?

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Thanks guys! I'm going to try and get it hooked up over the weekend. I need to run some new airlines and do some electrical work but once it's all hooked up, I'll give it a try as-is and figure out exactly what needs to be replaced. Those Clemco style guns look nice but I may make do with what I've got for a few months while I let my budget recover from the recent glut of machine tool buying.

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  • Excellent
    replied
    Originally posted by ken View Post
    I have used a few different blasting machines and this is the gun I like the most https://www.ebay.com/itm/REPLACES-CL...QAAOSweHtdsG4U and you can get different size nozzles in A/O or carbide nozzles.
    I second that. It's an excellent gun. Stainless. It's also plenty easy to turn yourself a bushing to adapt it to fit the smaller ceramic nozzles made for the cheaper guns, if you so desire. I only will because I have some left over from an old setup, but like Ken said you can get boron carbide nozzles for them, too.

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
    A fine metal screen in front of the glass will extend the life by at least 5X. It does degrade the view a bit, but with proper lighting it isn't a problem.
    I talked to a guy that installed the same setup 20 yrs ago and still on original glass,I think results would vary on distance from glass.And I forgot to ask him

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  • ken
    replied
    I have used a few different blasting machines and this is the gun I like the most https://www.ebay.com/itm/REPLACES-CL...QAAOSweHtdsG4U and you can get different size nozzles in A/O or carbide nozzles. as for glass I went to a glass shop and had them cut me some glass and I got tempered safety I read that it last longer than laminated safety glass and from what I see it does in my machine. somewhere I have seen a retrofit were you put a new window assy on your blast cabinet that has a roll of plastic film on rollers and as the film get eached you just roll the new into place never did like the indvil plastic ones with the tape with a big machine you can get into they are ok but a smaller machine like yours and mine it a pain now I am older ken

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  • chipmaker4130
    replied
    A fine metal screen in front of the glass will extend the life by at least 5X. It does degrade the view a bit, but with proper lighting it isn't a problem.

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    I am a big fan of getting a pile of polycarbonate plastic sheets cut, and taping one to the inside of the glass. Those sheets are about 50 cents and it's great to be able to instantly restore 100% viewing. Much easier than replacing glass. Then, you can get some extra strong glass cut. Now it's safer and easier to use.

    metalmagpie

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  • thaiguzzi
    replied
    Glass beads, in different grades, especially used wet rather than dry are ideal for engine components, c/heads, crank cases etc for degreasing, cleaning and putting a wonderful finish on.
    However, complicated oil ways etc need strict cleansing or masking off.
    Glass beads are no good for paint removal.
    For paint removal you want masked off gasket faces or any critical areas protected, and use al/ox (pink or white), garnet and sand, in that order.
    Walnut shells and other similar stuff (olive ?) i never got on with, but is generally used for applications like glass beads (without the lustre or fine finish) but it won't damage internal components if you have'nt got all of it out, like glass will.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    You could also use soda to blast soft things. Works as well as walnut at low pressure, leaves a very fine texture.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

    Thanks RB211 - I'm sure I'll have plenty of questions as I get into it. I ran one for a little while back in college but that's my only experience with a 10EE.
    Have yet to run mine, it's still on the pallet. Need to drain the oil, refill, clean it up, make sure the oilers work and other stuff. But before any of that gets done, need to make room for it.

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Welcome to the 10EE club. The mystery 10EE buyer has been revealed.
    Thanks RB211 - I'm sure I'll have plenty of questions as I get into it. I ran one for a little while back in college but that's my only experience with a 10EE.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
    Is that a siphon style,don't see 2 hoses going to nozzle?
    Yes, it is a siphon style. You're probably looking at the blow gun. The blast nozzle is the clunky looking thing hanging from a retractable leash.

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Is that a siphon style,don't see 2 hoses going to nozzle?

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  • RB211
    replied
    Welcome to the 10EE club. The mystery 10EE buyer has been revealed.

    Leave a comment:

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