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What did I buy?Anyone know what it is?

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  • What did I buy?Anyone know what it is?

    Made in Sweden, looks old

  • #2
    Early cordless drill prototype? LOL

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    • #3
      Victorian bedroom toy?

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      • #4
        Does not ring an immediate bell.

        But it appears to clamp onto a table, etc, and to spin the rod rather quickly, given the apparent step-up ratio. That suggests winding up something, perhaps a weaver's tool for winding yarn onto a spool etc.

        On a completely different tack, it might wind up fishing line onto a spool, or, perhaps, even a "lead" used aboard ship, although it looks somewhat light-built for use aboard ship..

        I do not see what would hold a spool or similar item onto the rod, there may be a key, or a threaded area perhaps? Or maybe it was just set up with a collar and thumb screw.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          I bought it because it was different & I'm ready to put the 2nd Gatling, a 22lr together & hope I can use it there. It's not as authenic so I can use a belt from the shaft to a cogged pully inside.

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          • #6
            Click image for larger version

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ID:	1858214Click image for larger version

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ID:	1858212This is a bobbin winder for a floor loom. 6 or 7 careers ago, back in the day, my wife and I made handwoven clothing and did the craft fair circuit. A bobbin presses onto the tapered spindle for winding yarn. The bobbin in then placed in the shuttle of the loom and thrown back and forth to make the weft. I made several of these but with sewing machine motors than than hand cranked. Pictures shortly.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by mickeyf; 02-26-2020, 11:14 PM.
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #7
              Usually, the worm turns the gear, not the other way around.

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              • #8
                Also, some of the best know well reputed looms are from Sweden - Glimakra.
                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                • #9

                  To me it seems the helix angle is optimized to provide an efficient transfer of power from the hand crank to the output shaft. It looks like what, about 5 to 1 step up, or more, you probably don't lose much energy driving the worm that way, and you get a respectable amount of rpm on the output shaft. Using todays lubricants this device would probably still work well.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    Kinda brings to mind a rope twisting device, to me. Though I've only seen a couple.
                    A google for such brought up this ebay item, which, though not exactly the same, does seem to share a similar appearance for the gear casting.
                    https://www.ebay.com/i/362624460256?...yABEgKO3vD_BwE
                    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                    • #11
                      I think winding cord, rope or other fibers is what it is. Thank you!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                        Victorian bedroom toy?
                        you know, just because you put the word "Victorian" ahead of your answer does not mean it's right... I mean - it's not a picture nail fer cri sakes lol

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                        • #13
                          Dang, I actually had the right idea.... I figured I would be totally wrong and it would turn out to be something off the wall..
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            How strange... i just noticed one of those on the local Swedish auction site. Hold on a minute.

                            Yup, it is precisely what mickeyf and J Tiers said-- a thread spooling device commonly used in association with weaving looms. Some folks also adapt them for use in tying flies for fishing, it seems. Not a rare item; there are lots of them.

                            That is a clever adaptation you have in mind. Lemme see what i could use one of those for...

                            .
                            Last edited by Dr. Rob; 02-27-2020, 06:32 AM.

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                            • #15
                              No doubt about it. A bobbin winder for (hand) weaving. X wife had one. With a drop or two of oil they work very well.

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