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Thumper---A new 1 3/8" bore i.c. engine

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  • Yes, I can hear the microswitch click just as I start to depress the pedal. Yes, if I completely take my foot off the pedal the arc does stop.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

    Comment


    • Today was practice running weld beads, using filler wire. Trying different amperage settings and travel speeds. I was concerned that perhaps I wouldn't be able to use this welder, because I couldn't see the arc puddle clearly enough. Found out today that with a higher amperage comes a larger molten weld puddle and it all becomes easier to see. I did order a set of pyrex clear glass welding cups--they don't directly make you a better welder, but they allow you to see much more of what is actually happening. I am, as I said before, amazed at how quickly these welders consume welding rod, compared to oxy acetylene.

      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

      Comment


      • Brian- what filler are you using?
        What size tungsten?
        can you snap a picture of your electrode sticking out of the cup?
        These things might help diagnose what you’ve got going on.

        Sid

        Comment


        • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
          Today was practice running weld beads, using filler wire. Trying different amperage settings and travel speeds. I was concerned that perhaps I wouldn't be able to use this welder, because I couldn't see the arc puddle clearly enough. Found out today that with a higher amperage comes a larger molten weld puddle and it all becomes easier to see. I did order a set of pyrex clear glass welding cups--they don't directly make you a better welder, but they allow you to see much more of what is actually happening. I am, as I said before, amazed at how quickly these welders consume welding rod, compared to oxy acetylene.
          Brian, you might already be aware but welding suppliers carry magnifying lenses that go inside helmets. Alternately, lots of guys use dollar store reading glasses under the helmet.

          Does your helmet have adjustable darkness settings? As you discovered, seeing that puddle well is very important to success.

          Comment


          • I am using a #5 cup and the tungsten is sticking out 5/16" past the cup end. Running about 12 to 15 cubic feet of argon per minute.(or hour, not sure which). I have my helmet set at level #9 sometimes at #10. I know about cheater lenses for inside the helmet, but after my eye surgery last year my eyesight is pretty good, and I am wearing my glasses under my welding helmet. I am using a 3/32" tungsten and 3/32" rod The rod is ER70S-2 and the tungsten is 2% thoriated #2PC332.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

            Comment


            • If you go with gas lenses, you can stick the tungsten out much farther, greatly increasing your field of view. They are not expensive (the last set I got online had two of each size, collets, lenses and cups included for around $35. The gas calibration is in cubic feet per hour. The pyrex cups are neat, but the rim distorts the view so its not like you have a perfect picture of the puddle from the slant-view.
              Last edited by chipmaker4130; 04-14-2020, 07:05 PM.
              Southwest Utah

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              • Woke up this morning to a new 1" of snow on the ground. No welding practice today.--May pull the engine crankshaft out and mill the keyways for the flywheels.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • Can you "borrow" a couple flywheels off another motor temporarily so you can get thumper running and work out any bugs?

                  Comment


                  • So now we have keyways cut into the crankshaft. I even made a couple of keys the right size. I posed the keys in place long enough to take this picture. Now I will take the keys out and store them in a dedicated container, or, sure as God made little green apples, they will disappear before I get to final assembly.--And I promise, next time I take this thing apart I will file that opening smooth in the side of the cam box!!
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                    Comment


                    • Sparky---The thought has crossed my mind, but no. I will have my new flywheel/fans finished within the next week, and then depending on how good or bad the welds look, I may paint the flywheels before installation. I learned many years ago that a coat of paint hides a lot of sins, and I've had Sid chew on me enough about my silver soldered joints.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                      Comment


                      • This morning I put on my mask and my gloves and my iron underwear, and went over to my welding supplier to pick up some 1/16" tungsten and some 1/16" filler rods. Prepaid by phone to avoid any close contact, material was left for me in vestibule. Came home and wiped everything down with varsol, then washed my hands with dish soap and hot water for 30 seconds. What a giant pain in the arse!!--At any rate, I wanted to see how the tig welder works with a smaller rod and tungsten. I have shown myself that I can lay down a bead with 3/32" tungsten and rod, even if the bead is large and ugly. I have cut up a bunch of 1" x 1/8" flat stock and prepared it in the same manner as the blades in my flywheel/fan. I made a cheap and nasty fixture to hold all of these pieces beside a larger piece of steel, in the same relationship as the fan blades, and will practice later today with the smaller rod.


                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                          Sparky---The thought has crossed my mind, but no. I will have my new flywheel/fans finished within the next week, and then depending on how good or bad the welds look, I may paint the flywheels before installation. I learned many years ago that a coat of paint hides a lot of sins, and I've had Sid chew on me enough about my silver soldered joints.


                          Now, now!

                          Sid
                          Click image for larger version

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                          • Today I welded up one of the flywheel fans. Let me be the first to say its uglier than original sin!! However, I haven't done any clean up on it yet. I've welded it in all of the spots (4 per blade,) that I intended to. I didn't melt anything away, although I probably added three times as much filler rod as I needed to at every spot. There seems to be only micro-seconds between having the metal molten enough to 'merge' with the filler weld and so hot that you burn away the fan-blade. I tried it with a 1/16" tungsten and filler rod at 70 amps max and with 3/32" tungsten and filler rod at 115 amps max. I am dazzled by how quickly everything happens. Back in the day, I did a lot of oxy-acetylene welding, and since I controlled the torch, things only happened as fast as I wanted them to. With this TIG process, it keeps wanting to run away on me. It gets so hot, so quickly, and gets molten so quickly that I'm afraid I'm going to melt everything before I get a chance to add any filler rod. Next step will be to clean everything up and decide if I want to add any more weld anywhere.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                            Comment


                            • I sat around after my welding, trying to analyse what was happening. I decided that it must have been the foot pedal. It wasn't the fault of the pedal. It was just the way I was using it. Ran things with the pedal "on the floor". Tomorrow I will try some welding with more of my attention on what position I am holding the pedal in.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                              Comment


                              • I'm sure you're right, Brian. Treat the pedal as a throttle - start out slow and increase until you like the action.


                                -js
                                There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                                Location: SF Bay Area

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