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  • #16
    Nickel---what cad are you re-learning?--Brian
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #17
      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
      Nickel---what cad are you re-learning?--Brian
      Brian -- I would love to re-learn Solidworks 2012, but that is well beyond my means at this time. I had a year of it with MasterCam feeding into Haas machines at the community college back in 2012. I found out that I was far better at manual machining since most of my background is in repair. However, I did OK at the CAD (not great, but a good beginning).

      So now I am trying with a free 2-D program called Q-Cad and another one called FreeCad,(3-D) both of which run well on my computer. I need to learn how to set the application preferences for scaling to my paper size and etc. Also all kinds of basic stuff to save steps and save clicks on repetitive part positioning, dimensioning and constraints,etc.

      35 years ago in college I was in the last class to have manual drafting. It is still my go-to, for now.
      Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-28-2020, 07:06 PM.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #18
        I worked on the board from 1965 to 1995. Then I took a 6 week college night school class and learned on the famously horrible Autocad 13--(can you say blue screen of death?). I worked in Autocad until about 2000, then bought Solidworks and have worked in it since. I find that after 20 years of Solidworks I can hardly work in Autocad at all. You actually learn to visualize in 3D and then it's darned near impossible to think in 2D again.
        Brian Rupnow
        Design engineer
        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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        • #19
          Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
          I worked on the board from 1965 to 1995. Then I took a 6 week college night school class and learned on the famously horrible Autocad 13--(can you say blue screen of death?). I worked in Autocad until about 2000, then bought Solidworks and have worked in it since. I find that after 20 years of Solidworks I can hardly work in Autocad at all. You actually learn to visualize in 3D and then it's darned near impossible to think in 2D again.
          Yes, I froze solid with panic for the first week. Then something "clicked" and the whole world was 3-D. Of course I made my share of mistakes, but I did pass the class. Solidworks was very intimidating at first but once I learned my way around it became very intuitive. I want to get that intuitive feeling back.
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #20
            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

            Brian -- I would love to re-learn Solidworks 2012, but that is well beyond my means at this time. I had a year of it with MasterCam feeding into Haas machines at the community college back in 2012. I found out that I was far better at manual machining since most of my background is in repair. However, I did OK at the CAD (not great, but a good beginning).

            So now I am trying with a free 2-D program called Q-Cad and another one called FreeCad,(3-D) both of which run well on my computer. I need to learn how to set the application preferences for scaling to my paper size and etc. Also all kinds of basic stuff to save steps and save clicks on repetitive part positioning, dimensioning and constraints,etc.

            35 years ago in college I was in the last class to have manual drafting. It is still my go-to, for now.
            I'd highly suggest becoming a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association for the small fee, get access to Solidworks, you'll get the student edition Solidworks 2019.
            I mean, maybe for your needs, 2D is all you need, but a whole new world opens up with 3D, including 3D printing, and large assembly design like my live steam projects.
            And for me personally, I found parametric 3D CAD much easier to learn and much more intuitive than 2D.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by RB211 View Post

              I'd highly suggest becoming a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association for the small fee, get access to Solidworks, you'll get the student edition Solidworks 2019.
              I mean, maybe for your needs, 2D is all you need, but a whole new world opens up with 3D, including 3D printing, and large assembly design like my live steam projects.
              And for me personally, I found parametric 3D CAD much easier to learn and much more intuitive than 2D.
              I actually *have* considered doing this, being somewhat familiar with Solidworks already. Main question for me is, do they have a native UNIX version (since that's what my system is). I know they have a full commercial version that does, but last I looked that was like 5 grand.

              One thing I loved about Solidworks is the ability to see how things are going to move, and potential interference. in all the simulations.
              Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-28-2020, 08:40 PM.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #22
                Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                One thing I loved about Solidworks is the ability to see how things are going to move, and potential interference. in all the simulations.
                That gets me thinking about possibilities. Someday I hope to see modeling software which can include dynamic response to forces and pressures. This capability would enable an engine model to "run" in a virtual space. If it could simulate frictional forces (as from piston rings), and include basic thermal and fluid properties, a lot of product development could be done in software.

                Allan Ostling

                Phoenix, Arizona

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by aostling View Post

                  That gets me thinking about possibilities. Someday I hope to see modeling software which can include dynamic response to forces and pressures. This capability would enable an engine model to "run" in a virtual space. If it could simulate frictional forces (as from piston rings), and include basic thermal and fluid properties, a lot of product development could be done in software.
                  High end versions of Solidworks already do this. Those are add-on packages that bring it up to around $10k per seat license... You should see the ads in Aviation Week. There are also custom industry-specific versions that large companies paid big bucks for.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #24
                    I learned CAD long ago, but it was a different type.. back then it was Cardboard Aided Design.... the main materials , cereal box cardboard, and scissors..

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      High end versions of Solidworks already do this. Those are add-on packages that bring it up to around $10k per seat license... You should see the ads in Aviation Week. There are also custom industry-specific versions that large companies paid big bucks for.
                      Student edition of Solidworks included with the EAA has all the simulation features enabled. I tried simulating the motion of a valve gear on a locomotive and my computer at the time couldn't handle it in 3D. Solidworks however has a super nifty 2d sketch method of animating things which Fusion360 does not.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                        Student edition of Solidworks included with the EAA has all the simulation features enabled. I tried simulating the motion of a valve gear on a locomotive and my computer at the time couldn't handle it in 3D. Solidworks however has a super nifty 2d sketch method of animating things which Fusion360 does not.
                        Thanks for the heads-up, I have to look into this. The student ed I used before only had the mechanical sims.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #27
                          The flywheels will both be set up to flow air in the same direction. If they blew air towards each other or away from each other, I don't really know what the air flow would be like. If they both blow air the same direction, then I can be sure that they push/pull the air in the same direction, over the cylinder.
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                          • #28
                            The design is complete and the detail drawings are all finished. The only parts not shown on the drawing are the valve springs. I will root around in my stockpile of odds and ends to see what I actually have to start working on, knowing that I will buy the bulk of the material on Monday to really get into this.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #29
                              The rockerblock is looking good!

                              Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                              ...I find that after 20 years of Solidworks I can hardly work in Autocad at all. You actually learn to visualize in 3D and then it's darned near impossible to think in 2D again.
                              I have the same problem. It's gotten to the point that I even do hand sketches in isometric and other people are like "wait, what is this?".


                              Location: Northern WI

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                              • #30
                                So what do you do when it's the middle of winter and you don't want to go and play outside?--Well of course, you make parts!!! I've rootled thru all of my scraps and came up with enough material to make the main rocker, the two cross pins for the ends of it, and the two spacers that keep the rocker centered in the frame. I have to buy a bunch of aluminum plate, but I've got enough odds and ends of material here to keep me busy over the weekend.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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