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  • Fusion 360 changes...

    I'm not totally sure what's going on with Fusion....

    Best I can understand is they no longer will identify an installation of Fusion by serial number, instead it'll be by user. So, currently it's possible a computer with multiple users could have one installation for all users. With the new system (as I understand it) the installation will be by user. What that seems to mean is every user will have to have their own installation (license). .

    Anybody here know more about this than me? And what are the long term effects?

    I feel like saying "I told you so", What I mean is I've been predicting Autodesk was going to do something bad to users.

  • #2
    Originally posted by DR View Post
    I'm not totally sure what's going on with Fusion....

    Best I can understand is they no longer will identify an installation of Fusion by serial number, instead it'll be by user. So, currently it's possible a computer with multiple users could have one installation for all users. With the new system (as I understand it) the installation will be by user. What that seems to mean is every user will have to have their own installation (license). .

    Anybody here know more about this than me? And what are the long term effects?

    I feel like saying "I told you so", What I mean is I've been predicting Autodesk was going to do something bad to users.
    All your files are stored on the cloud. You can cache some stuff locally, but yes, multiple users with only one installation. It's been this way for a long time. Unless something like CAM is keeping you on Fusion360, I highly suggest becoming an Experimental Aircraft Association member for less than 40$ and getting the student version of Solidworks 2019 which keeps all of your files locally.
    However, in a multi user environment on the same computer, Fusion360 would be much less of a pain. With Solidworks, you would need to deactivate your copy to allow another person to activate it.

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    • #3
      The EAA solidworks is the Student Premium version, better than the plain student version. I have considered going to it, the main thing holding me back is it has pretty high hardware requirements. My present computer that I use for fusion isn't even close to what solidworks requires yet it runs great with fusion. Solidworks requires a pretty powerful video card also.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
        The EAA solidworks is the Student Premium version, better than the plain student version. I have considered going to it, the main thing holding me back is it has pretty high hardware requirements. My present computer that I use for fusion isn't even close to what solidworks requires yet it runs great with fusion. Solidworks requires a pretty powerful video card also.
        The requirements aren't that steep, I think the built in video on an i7 or i5 is just fine. However, if you want to use the new hardware graphics engine, you'll need OpenGL 4.5. Newer video cards support it, older ones do not. The Radeon 7980 HD on my laptop does only 4.4. I am going to upgrade the graphics on this laptop(has removeable video cards) to perhaps a Nvidia 1060.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post

          The requirements aren't that steep, I think the built in video on an i7 or i5 is just fine. However, if you want to use the new hardware graphics engine, you'll need OpenGL 4.5. Newer video cards support it, older ones do not. The Radeon 7980 HD on my laptop does only 4.4. I am going to upgrade the graphics on this laptop(has removeable video cards) to perhaps a Nvidia 1060.
          What are the specs of the puter you are using it on? Sometimes the companies specs are aimed at power users and if you are only doing relatively simple things the softwares run fine on less than the specs they list as required. I think the computer I use for fusion is a I7 and around 2.3 ghz, maybe 8ghz of ram and only a mediocre video card. No complaints at all of its performance with fusion for my purposes.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

            What are the specs of the puter you are using it on? Sometimes the companies specs are aimed at power users and if you are only doing relatively simple things the softwares run fine on less than the specs they list as required. I think the computer I use for fusion is a I7 and around 2.3 ghz, maybe 8ghz of ram and only a mediocre video card. No complaints at all of its performance with fusion for my purposes.
            This is an 8 year old Alienware 18" gaming laptop. Has a 3rd gen i7 3820QM CPU. 16gb ram. This thing still holds its own. For its day, this thing was a powerhouse. Compared to todays top of the line gaming laptops, it's nothing.
            Compared to what I imagine most homeshop machinists have, guess you can still consider it high end, especially if I put a 1060 or 970 video card in it.

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            • #7
              This is easier to explain
              Click image for larger version

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              • #8
                I just found out I'll have to buy a winBlows box to run it. I refuse to give Gates a nickel. Not that i have any. UNIX was up and running the world when he was still in grade school.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                  I just found out I'll have to buy a winBlows box to run it. I refuse to give Gates a nickel. Not that i have any. UNIX was up and running the world when he was still in grade school.
                  Linux has its place, 3D Cad is not one of them. You might still be able to get Win10 for free if you do a search. If you have a Microsoft account, you may already have a Windows10 key.
                  If you aquire a used piece of crap computer with Win10 on it, log onto your Microsoft account, then release the license of that Win10 box to your account. Install Win10 on your CAD rig, log in with your Microsoft account and it should transfer over.
                  But seriously, you will never have a high end CAD package on Linux. Give up the silly fight and get on with it.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                    Linux has its place, 3D Cad is not one of them. You might still be able to get Win10 for free if you do a search. If you have a Microsoft account, you may already have a Windows10 key.
                    If you aquire a used piece of crap computer with Win10 on it, log onto your Microsoft account, then release the license of that Win10 box to your account. Install Win10 on your CAD rig, log in with your Microsoft account and it should transfer over.
                    But seriously, you will never have a high end CAD package on Linux. Give up the silly fight and get on with it.
                    Good thing I'm not running Linux. Linux is not UNIX. Also, fsck MS right in the skull. I heard that Pro/E had a native Solaris version a while back, I might have to get used to SysV syntax. Due to their business practices and ****house engineering, MS isn't allowed on my property.
                    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 02-29-2020, 10:41 PM.
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      Good thing I'm not running Linux. Linux is not UNIX. Also, fsck MS.
                      It might as well be DOS 2.0, you ain't playing with a nice 3D CAD package.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                        It might as well be DOS 2.0, you ain't playing with a nice 3D CAD package.
                        And yet, I seem to be doing my thing just fine with firefox and open office and various mp3 players, dvd editing, etc. And *vastly* superior network security.

                        Nah. I'll pass. MS left that bad of a taste in my mouth back in the 90's. Bastardsw.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          And yet, I seem to be doing my thing just fine with firefox and open office and various mp3 players, dvd editing, etc. And *vastly* superior network security.

                          Nah. I'll pass. MS left that bad of a taste in my mouth back in the 90's. Bastardsw.
                          Fusion runs on MacOS as well, but Microsoft sits prettier than Apple in my book.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                            Fusion runs on MacOS as well, but Microsoft sits prettier than Apple in my book.
                            Interesting, I didn't know that. I don't have any MAC stuff, its just too expensive for me. I do know that Pro/E had a Solaris version (now owned by Oracle), but their UI is not as good as Solidworks. The only way I can see myself running it is if I get a used laptop or something, and never go online with it. In that case I'd be OK with it... maybe. Basically a disposable thing. From the standpoint of computer engineering, MS is basically the Seig of the software world -- just because everyone has it doesn't mean its any good. It does mean that their business practices are extremely shady.

                            FWIW I have my desktop setup like Windows 7 but with green accents and its running on a native UNIX
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                              It might as well be DOS 2.0, you ain't playing with a nice 3D CAD package.
                              Guys are running fusion under linux using a virtual machine with excellent performance.
                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djJlwW5qIz8
                              Last edited by Sparky_NY; 02-29-2020, 11:10 PM.

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