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  • #31
    I'm looking for a sketching program that behaves like my old beloved AutoCAD R12 for DOS. Just 2D drawing. I loved the keyboard shortcuts and remember them well enough to want to keep using them (L 3,4 @5<45 for instance to draw a line from point 3,4 for 5 units at 45°). Can Fusion360 behave that simply in any kind of 2D mode? Or does FreeCAD or LibreCAD work that way?

    At any rate, what is my best bet for an infrequently used technical sketching program? I need dimensions and accurate angles and so forth... old-school 2d CAD stuff.

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    • #32
      Autodesk reworked the entire licensing system for fusion360 not too long ago. Dunno how much it related to the original question on per system user installs, but they changed around the plan tiers. You can still get the free license, but they took a fair few features out of it, like conversion of file formats, i.e free users can no longer import Inventor files into Fusion. Had a bit of a SNAFU with my account about a month back because of the license change.

      On one hand, I'm still getting a ridiculously powerful cad/cam package for absolutely free. Which is insane, but I can't help but be a little upset that they removed some features for free users. Kinda sucks, but I sure can't afford the $1000+ yearly subscription for alternatives

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      • #33
        Originally posted by AntonLargiader View Post
        I'm looking for a sketching program that behaves like my old beloved AutoCAD R12 for DOS. Just 2D drawing. I loved the keyboard shortcuts and remember them well enough to want to keep using them (L 3,4 @5<45 for instance to draw a line from point 3,4 for 5 units at 45°). Can Fusion360 behave that simply in any kind of 2D mode? Or does FreeCAD or LibreCAD work that way?

        At any rate, what is my best bet for an infrequently used technical sketching program? I need dimensions and accurate angles and so forth... old-school 2d CAD stuff.
        Does it have to be free? Draftsight is as close to AutoCAD as you can get as far as I know, but it's now $99/year
        Location: Northern WI

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        • #34
          Don't know how it compares with AutoCAD, but Solid Edge 2D is free
          https://www.plm.automation.siemens.c...re/free-2d-cad

          The 3D version is free for noncommercial use as well. From my brief comparison of the two, the 3D version has all the 2D features. They share a common UI, just more ribbon tabs in the 3D version.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by AntonLargiader View Post
            I'm looking for a sketching program that behaves like my old beloved AutoCAD R12 for DOS. Just 2D drawing. I loved the keyboard shortcuts and remember them well enough to want to keep using them (L 3,4 @5<45 for instance to draw a line from point 3,4 for 5 units at 45°). Can Fusion360 behave that simply in any kind of 2D mode? Or does FreeCAD or LibreCAD work that way?

            At any rate, what is my best bet for an infrequently used technical sketching program? I need dimensions and accurate angles and so forth... old-school 2d CAD stuff.
            3D cad doesn't work so good for 2D work, it's not intended for that. Generally you have to make a 3D model and then the program will execute a 2D drawing if you want, cumbersome for what you want. You can still get 2D cad, Solidedge used to give away a 2D program that was really good, maybe they still do and there is a Autocad copycat (older style) that is available. The name escapes me but if you do a free 2D cad search you will get many results.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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            • #36
              I loaded LibreCAD and it is VERY much like ACAD. Of course, the basics are probably the same in most 2D CAD applications: osnap, chprop, int, etc. but anyway this one is pretty lightweight and seems to match my muscle memory pretty well so I will keep trying it. I watched a video of a guy drawing a bolt and it made total sense; he almost could have been using old ACAD.

              EDIT: deleted a bunch of comments that were wrong. The command alias list is easy to access in the installed application, and <space> as <enter> is available. It's looking better and better.
              Last edited by AntonLargiader; 05-15-2020, 08:44 AM.

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              • #37
                FYI: When looking for a CAD/CAM computer for power... look at gaming machines as RB11 alluded to. Every machine I found that was marketed for CAD was 2-3 times more expensive them similar power and spec gaming computers last time I was shopping around. Just look for a builder that doesn't preload a bunch of bloatware and malware like the big name manufacturers do.
                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
                  FYI: When looking for a CAD/CAM computer for power... look at gaming machines as RB11 alluded to. Every machine I found that was marketed for CAD was 2-3 times more expensive them similar power and spec gaming computers last time I was shopping around. Just look for a builder that doesn't preload a bunch of bloatware and malware like the big name manufacturers do.
                  True enough.

                  I bought a Dell G3-3590 laptop, 16 Gb, 6 processors, 512 Gb solid-state drive, Nvidia video processor, win 10 pro Just over a grand from Dell direct.

                  It's very good for CAD and rendering (Alibre/Keyshot). No bloatware issues aside from Win 10, but that is more or less unavoidable unless you are satisfied with "generic substitute" software.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                    True enough.

                    I bought a Dell G3-3590 laptop, 16 Gb, 6 processors, 512 Gb solid-state drive, Nvidia video processor, win 10 pro Just over a grand from Dell direct.

                    It's very good for CAD and rendering (Alibre/Keyshot). No bloatware issues aside from Win 10, but that is more or less unavoidable unless you are satisfied with "generic substitute" software.
                    Really. Dell finally learned that loading malware like Weathebug and that game system (I forget the name) was costing them repeat business. Good for them.

                    I resisted W10 for a long time, but I have both 32bit and 64bit machines running W10 Po now. They are operating acceptably. I still think W7Pro64 is the best W-OS for machine controllers if you have enough PC and memory. That being said I am working n a build I am seriously considering LinuxCNC for since PathPilot (L-CNC derivative) so well on my Tormach. For many things the Tormach actually outperforms my Hurco. I know I should not have admitted that out loud. Now I'm going to have to listen to Skunkworks crow about it. LOL.
                    Last edited by Bob La Londe; 05-15-2020, 12:02 PM.
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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