Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maintenance Shop Rehab - California Edition

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Maintenance Shop Rehab - California Edition

    Here I go again. I recently took the reins of a not-very-smooth-running golf course equipment maintenance shop, this time in Northern California. This will be my fifth such golf shop that I have taken over as head wrench. The previous shops being in Bama, upstate NY, NJ. A couple of them have been basket cases- dysfunctional pig pens with no equipment records kept and very inefficient. I usually stay for a few years and transform them into clean, organized, efficient operations.

    My new shop consists of a small shop (what I will call the "workshop") which may have been built along with the course in 1924. Then there is a modern large shop attached, which was built in the 1970s. The workshop, where I will do the majority of the "surgery", is well-lit, heated, and is a real pig pen. The large shop contains a 2 post automotive lift, reel grinders, and houses most of the equipment at night. A typical 18 hole private high end club such as this one will have around one million dollars of equipment to keep up with. From weedeaters to backhoes.

    I've been here over a month and have been trying to restore the reel mowers back to factory specs, while repairing the grinders and doing the shop rehab at the same time. Kinda like tuning a carb while driving the car at the same time. I haven't even had time to look through all the tools and supplies that are piled up, and stuffed into hiding places, collecting dust for decades. There are some antique tools here mixed in with modern high quality stuff- Large roll around Miller mig welder, o/a rig, Parker hyd hose crimper, old Delta drill press, wifi etc.

    There is a tap chart on the wall that may have been tacked up when this shop was built. It is an Ace brand that shows all the common NC and NF threads as well as the following:
    1-56 NS
    3/16-32 NS
    10-30 NS
    12-32 NEF
    14-?? (I didn't write the pitch down correctly on my notes)
    1/4-24 NS
    1/4-32 NEF

    One of my first projects is going to be a proper work table and vise. Currently, there is a wood counter with a little 4" Chinese vise that was screwed down so the rear jaw is not proud of the front of the counter which is pretty dumb. The jaws have been smoothed down from use and they are loose of course. The jaw shank is bent of course and the swivel lock downs won't lock of course. And the counter/vise is too high of course. I think you get the picture- there has been adequate financial support to outfit this shop in the past but this is the kind of sorry **** that has been produced.

    My hardinge cataract lathe made the trip out here with me and I hope to get it up and running later in the year. A small mill may find it's way into the shop as well.

    Cheers



    -Roland
    Golf Course Mechanic

    Bedminster NJ

  • #2
    Before I retired I worked in and around Orinda regularly. Where exactly might this golf course be found?

    -js
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

    Location: SF Bay Area

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post
      Before I retired I worked in and around Orinda regularly. Where exactly might this golf course be found?

      -js
      PM sent.
      -Roland
      Golf Course Mechanic

      Bedminster NJ

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, I may already have a machining project/delimma on my hands. We will be installing 80 drain grate "risers" over the next couple years. The store-bought ones are cast aluminum and will cost $80 each for a total of about $7k. Basically just a ring 13" OD, 12" ID, 2.5" tall with a 1/2" counterbore on one end and a 1/2" shoulder on the other. The grate drops into the counterbore. I was asked to come up with a possible cheaper alternative. We just happen to have some left over 13" OD water main pipe (some kind of stout black plastic). I'm going to look for a local shop to make a prototype riser out of our pipe and try it out. If it works well and holds up to a tractor driving over it...

        I may be looking for a lathe with a 13" swing and a horizontal bandsaw with a budget of around $5k. Making our own risers would give us the advantage of making different lengths, probably from 1" to 3" range to fit each drain to the surrounding ground, instead of being stuck with the 2.5" length for all of them.
        -Roland
        Golf Course Mechanic

        Bedminster NJ

        Comment


        • #5
          Hmmm...
          https://sfbay.craigslist.org/scz/tls...088647025.html
          -Roland
          Golf Course Mechanic

          Bedminster NJ

          Comment


          • #6
            You got my mouth watering Roland. Looks like the Hendly lathes were top of the heap for their time. I'm closer to Watsonville than you are. Want to race?
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

            Comment


            • #7
              Should be gone by 10 am.. or spoken for..

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                Should be gone by 10 am.. or spoken for..
                Yeah, we have a lot of manufacturing equipment resellers in the SF bay area. They snap up the good deals real fast. By the time I figure out how to get something home it's already been snatched up. Thank god that my garage is full so that I am not as tempted any more.

                Dan
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rmcphearson View Post
                  Here I go again. I recently took the reins of a not-very-smooth-running golf course equipment maintenance shop, this time in Northern California. This will be my fifth such golf shop that I have taken over as head wrench. The previous shops being in Bama, upstate NY, NJ. A couple of them have been basket cases- dysfunctional pig pens with no equipment records kept and very inefficient. I usually stay for a few years and transform them into clean, organized, efficient operations.

                  My new shop consists of a small shop (what I will call the "workshop") which may have been built along with the course in 1924. Then there is a modern large shop attached, which was built in the 1970s. The workshop, where I will do the majority of the "surgery", is well-lit, heated, and is a real pig pen. The large shop contains a 2 post automotive lift, reel grinders, and houses most of the equipment at night. A typical 18 hole private high end club such as this one will have around one million dollars of equipment to keep up with. From weedeaters to backhoes.

                  I've been here over a month and have been trying to restore the reel mowers back to factory specs, while repairing the grinders and doing the shop rehab at the same time. Kinda like tuning a carb while driving the car at the same time. I haven't even had time to look through all the tools and supplies that are piled up, and stuffed into hiding places, collecting dust for decades. There are some antique tools here mixed in with modern high quality stuff- Large roll around Miller mig welder, o/a rig, Parker hyd hose crimper, old Delta drill press, wifi etc.

                  There is a tap chart on the wall that may have been tacked up when this shop was built. It is an Ace brand that shows all the common NC and NF threads as well as the following:
                  1-56 NS
                  3/16-32 NS
                  10-30 NS
                  12-32 NEF
                  14-?? (I didn't write the pitch down correctly on my notes)
                  1/4-24 NS
                  1/4-32 NEF

                  One of my first projects is going to be a proper work table and vise. Currently, there is a wood counter with a little 4" Chinese vise that was screwed down so the rear jaw is not proud of the front of the counter which is pretty dumb. The jaws have been smoothed down from use and they are loose of course. The jaw shank is bent of course and the swivel lock downs won't lock of course. And the counter/vise is too high of course. I think you get the picture- there has been adequate financial support to outfit this shop in the past but this is the kind of sorry **** that has been produced.

                  My hardinge cataract lathe made the trip out here with me and I hope to get it up and running later in the year. A small mill may find it's way into the shop as well.

                  Cheers


                  " I usually stay for a few years and transform them into clean, organized, efficient operations."

                  Maybe you can have your own TV show.......... Golf Course Shop Rescue !

                  JL.........................

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ford used a 14-24 screw on the flywheels of Model Ts. They were brass and held the magnet keepers and stand-offs to the flywheel. Ford also used a strange size and thread on the differential. I think it was 13/32-24. A 3/8 bolt was loose and 7/16 wouldn't fit. Ford also used some non-standard bolt head sizes. Keep in mind that this was before standards were written. Most all factories that did in-house machining also made their own nuts and bolts before ~1930. Some factories followed the British standard. Early autos were a mix of whatever was available in hardware and tooling. Working on mechanical items or cars made prior to 1929 is always a crap-shoot. When was the last time you used a 13/16" wrench?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                      ... When was the last time you used a 13/16" wrench?
                      Funny you should ask - I used one yesterday. To tighten a quick-disconnect air coupler:
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	coupler.jpg
Views:	1160
Size:	30.1 KB
ID:	1860020

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I found a local shop to make the prototype riser. I am swamped just getting this shop functioning at a basic level. Don't really want to take on a 13" lathe acquisition right now but it looks it is going to happen. I've just begun looking around. I've been given a budget of around 4k for the lathe.

                        There is a Parker hyd hose crimper, hose, and a stockpile of (the wrong) hose ends here. If I can get an assortment of the ends that we use I will save a lot of time and some $ by making my own hoses. We go through a fair amount since our fleet is on the older side.

                        There is a site built wooden bolt bin that I think may have been installed soon after the shop was built in '24. Dadoed close grain 1x4s and pressboard. It was filled with trash and crap that I can't use. I cleaned it out and vacuumed the 1/8" layer of dust out of each bin. Not sure if I will use if for hyd ends or hardware yet.
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by rmcphearson; 03-14-2020, 12:47 PM.
                        -Roland
                        Golf Course Mechanic

                        Bedminster NJ

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am sure that soon folks will be privately alerting management to the "fact" that you are screwing up everything and slowing down the shop..... almost never fails.

                          If management wants you to fix the shop, they will support you . But long-time employees tend to have some "pull"... and ways (as you have found out, I am sure) of making their predictions come true.
                          2730

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Everything not impossible is compulsory

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rmcphearson View Post
                            I found a local shop to make the prototype riser. I am swamped just getting this shop functioning at a basic level. Don't really want to take on a 13" lathe acquisition right now but it looks it is going to happen. I've just begun looking around. I've been given a budget of around 4k for the lathe.

                            There is a Parker hyd hose crimper, hose, and a stockpile of (the wrong) hose ends here. If I can get an assortment of the ends that we use I will save a lot of time and some $ by making my own hoses. We go through a fair amount since our fleet is on the older side.

                            There is a site built wooden bolt bin that I think may have been installed soon after the shop was built in '24. Dadoed close grain 1x4s and pressboard. It was filled with trash and crap that I can't use. I cleaned it out and vacuumed the 1/8" layer of dust out of each bin. Not sure if I will use if for hyd ends or hardware yet.
                            If you come across a Lista,Vidamar or Rousseau style parts cabinet they work great for bolts,nuts and other fasteners.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Tha lathe purchase/project is on hold. I have made a little progress on the shop rehab (between emergency equipment repairs). I did end up filling the above wooden parts bin with hyd hose ends. We use a lot of FFOR ends so I bought enough to complete an assortment of one pair of FFOR ends for the four different sizes. My equipment also uses a fair amount of JIC ends so I will do the same with JIC ends eventually. I realized that the FFOR ends and JIC ends can be stored in the same bin (the ffor on one side and the jic ends on the other side of each bin) because they are identical except for the very "ends" of the ends. That worked out very well. A small victory!
                              -Roland
                              Golf Course Mechanic

                              Bedminster NJ

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X