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Tool ident? My Dad found it and gave it to me. We dont know its use?

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  • Tool ident? My Dad found it and gave it to me. We dont know its use?

    He knows I like old tools that are odd. So during his wanderings he saw this for a buck and a half and thought I would like it.

    I do, we just dont understand what it was used for.

    His thought was to hold hot rivets to set. To me thats the best guess.

    No markings on the tool, and the hex bolt doesn't belong. The square head does

    Any help? JR


    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1861004

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1861005

  • #2
    Similar items were pipe pliers. The straight jaw jammed into the pipe to hold it from turning
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      Similar items were pipe pliers. The straight jaw jammed into the pipe to hold it from turning
      Well nice. He is gonna like to hear that cause he was a lineman and part time plumber. Thanks. JR

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        Similar items were pipe pliers. The straight jaw jammed into the pipe to hold it from turning
        I can't visualize any such use like that. If the straight jaw is jammed into the pipe, then the curved jaw, and handles too, are now aligned longitudinally with the pipe. How would any turning force be applied?
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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        • #5
          Antique Channel Locks maybe?????
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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          • #6
            Being a mechanic (retired Mechanics instructor), they look like battery bolt pliers. I’ve taught to never use pliers or Crescent type wrenches on fasteners if sockets or proper wrenches are available. But battery bolt pliers are indispensable as the bolt/nuts are often corroded and sockets/wrenches don’t fit well so this type plier is an exception to the “no plier” rule.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lynnl View Post

              I can't visualize any such use like that. If the straight jaw is jammed into the pipe, then the curved jaw, and handles too, are now aligned longitudinally with the pipe. How would any turning force be applied?
              ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????

              The hooked jaw went around the pipe, and the straight jaw jammed into it from the side. Somewhat like a "peavey". Doesn't mean those are exactly that type, just that they look quite a bit like what I have seen in old tool books stated to be for pipe.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #8
                Then JT, you didn't mean "into" the pipe, as in insert or penetrate; you meant "against" the side of the pipe!
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                • #9
                  Yes, J Tiers got it right. My dad had one such as JT described. It was a large one, handles probably 28" long, the lower jaw was adjustable for size. The adjustable jaw was sharpened, similar to a chisel. It was a bulldog, by that I mean it was powerful, better than a regular pipe wrench. Some guys trying to disassemble a steam system had some pipes that wouldn't turn loose till they used that wrench .

                  Sarge41

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                    Then JT, you didn't mean "into" the pipe, as in insert or penetrate; you meant "against" the side of the pipe!
                    It digs into the surface of the pipe to grab it. Hence "in".
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Early design of "pipe tongs" according to Audel's Plumber's Guides (1930 ed.)
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #12
                        Blacksmith tongs for round bars

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                        • #13
                          It's for installing those heavy rubber bands on the nuts of lambs and calves.

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                          • #14
                            The hex bolt laying next to it screws into round part of the tool that its next to on the tool from clamping down. So it looks adjustable for closing depth. JR

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                              The hex bolt laying next to it screws into round part of the tool that its next to on the tool from clamping down. So it looks adjustable for closing depth. JR
                              That makes a lot of sense as a pipe tool for a couple sizes of pipe. You could set the "bite" pretty well with that.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions.

                              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                              Comment

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