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Tool ident? My Dad found it and gave it to me. We dont know its use?

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by DICKEYBIRD View Post
    Usually just approaching them with the tool in hand does the trick.
    My doctor said that once....

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  • DICKEYBIRD
    replied
    The direction of action is correct. It's for adjusting the attitudes of recalcitrant lambs & calves. Usually just approaching them with the tool in hand does the trick.
    Last edited by DICKEYBIRD; 03-14-2020, 02:05 PM.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by Yondering View Post
    It's for installing those heavy rubber bands on the nuts of lambs and calves.
    No the action of the tool is backwards.
    http://homesteadadvisor.com/Lamb Castration is a pretty easy process. I'll show you how simple it is to band a ram lamb. This is basically the same process u...


    It's not one of these either.
    Buy the Jorvet white's style emasculator tool made from strong stainless steel. Prevents hemorrhage with multiple crushings for safety and ease.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Yondering View Post
    It's for installing those heavy rubber bands on the nuts of lambs and calves.
    You use a tool for that?

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  • Illinoyance
    replied
    Old timey tongs for lifting and holding small diameter well pipe.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    That makes a lot of sense as a pipe tool for a couple sizes of pipe. You could set the "bite" pretty well with that.
    Right? Its a variable pipe wrench? Thanks to all you folks for helping..... My Dad will be happy. And he will prolly drag more goodies to my house Thanks Again. JR

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post
    The hex bolt laying next to it screws into round part of the tool that its next to on the tool from clamping down. So it looks adjustable for closing depth. JR
    That makes a lot of sense as a pipe tool for a couple sizes of pipe. You could set the "bite" pretty well with that.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    The hex bolt laying next to it screws into round part of the tool that its next to on the tool from clamping down. So it looks adjustable for closing depth. JR

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  • Yondering
    replied
    It's for installing those heavy rubber bands on the nuts of lambs and calves.

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  • micrometer50
    replied
    Blacksmith tongs for round bars

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Early design of "pipe tongs" according to Audel's Plumber's Guides (1930 ed.)

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by lynnl View Post
    Then JT, you didn't mean "into" the pipe, as in insert or penetrate; you meant "against" the side of the pipe!
    It digs into the surface of the pipe to grab it. Hence "in".

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  • sarge41
    replied
    Yes, J Tiers got it right. My dad had one such as JT described. It was a large one, handles probably 28" long, the lower jaw was adjustable for size. The adjustable jaw was sharpened, similar to a chisel. It was a bulldog, by that I mean it was powerful, better than a regular pipe wrench. Some guys trying to disassemble a steam system had some pipes that wouldn't turn loose till they used that wrench .

    Sarge41

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  • lynnl
    replied
    Then JT, you didn't mean "into" the pipe, as in insert or penetrate; you meant "against" the side of the pipe!

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by lynnl View Post

    I can't visualize any such use like that. If the straight jaw is jammed into the pipe, then the curved jaw, and handles too, are now aligned longitudinally with the pipe. How would any turning force be applied?
    ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????

    The hooked jaw went around the pipe, and the straight jaw jammed into it from the side. Somewhat like a "peavey". Doesn't mean those are exactly that type, just that they look quite a bit like what I have seen in old tool books stated to be for pipe.

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