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  • OT. Craft Beer issue

    HI Group,

    I have been a beer drinker for many years. The craft beer scene came along and provided some nice varieties. Well, the latest is that many of these makers are putting their brews in CANS, and all I remember about beer in cans was it was nothing more than a flavored water vs the craft beers of today. I know, my issue but what the hay !

    So, I can't seem to bring myself to buying the craft beers in a can, and I'm finding it even harder to locate at the quicky mart any bottled beers.

    What say you that are beer drinkers out there, do find this an issue !!

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
    HI Group,

    I have been a beer drinker for many years. The craft beer scene came along and provided some nice varieties. Well, the latest is that many of these makers are putting their brews in CANS, and all I remember about beer in cans was it was nothing more than a flavored water vs the craft beers of today. I know, my issue but what the hay !

    So, I can't seem to bring myself to buying the craft beers in a can, and I'm finding it even harder to locate at the quicky mart any bottled beers.

    What say you that are beer drinkers out there, do find this an issue !!

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris
    I did some all grain brewing from about 95 to now. I have never canned a beer.

    I usually Lager in 5gal SS Cornelius kegs and tap from them after 11 months. JR

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    • #3
      We're up to our keesters in some really great craft breweries and brew pubs in our area. It's a wonderful time to be someone that enjoys a good mug of brown bubbly.

      I'd say that roughly half of the ones selling their beers through stores have them in both cans and bottles. And a few are in cans only.

      I've got nothing against them and find that the beer tastes the same regardless of bottle or can..... at least as long as I don't actually drink it from the can. Do that and all bets are off as our saliva seems to react with the exposed metal top and we taste that.

      So if you know it's an offering that you enjoy I say "can away"! ! !
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Many good beers are in a can, pour it into a chilled glass and enjoy.
        The simple fact that it is in a can does not make a good beer go suddenly bad.
        I also prefer draft beer, but many good craft beer is sold & distributed in a can

        Comment


        • #5
          The can is basically holding the epoxy bag within it into the can shape. The beer never touches the can, except for when it passes through the opening to get into your favorite mug.

          An interesting experiment would be to eat away the can to leave the liner behind. There's one for King of Random.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            The craft brewers are moving to cans as they grow big enough to afford the equipment. The cans don't break as easily and they are totally opaque which is important. The hops that give many craft beers their wonderful aroma are susceptible to UV light and will turn to a skunk odor if exposed. As many craft brews turn to adding more hops for aroma this becomes more important.

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            • #7
              Some good points on cans....maybe my rational brain can be convinced they don't affect the product, but I don't buy them. Most beer I'd drink is at home, drank without a glass. I don't like drinking out of a can, and they seem to warm too quickly.

              The business model with craft breweries is get enough share that the global factory breweries buy you out and you live happily ever after. Increasingly the factories keep the name and ops separate so it can be challenging to know if you're still supporting an independent (which I like to do)....I think the presence of cans is a hint they may not longer be independent
              Last edited by Mcgyver; 03-12-2020, 08:59 AM.
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darryl View Post
                The can is basically holding the epoxy bag within it into the can shape. The beer never touches the can, except for when it passes through the opening to get into your favorite mug.

                An interesting experiment would be to eat away the can to leave the liner behind. There's one for King of Random.
                Several years ago, I sat next to man on a flight, and we started a polite conversation, as one does. He was a salesman, or more correctly a sales engineer/chemist, for a company that made coatings for the internals of cans of all kinds. He mentioned that almost all cans have some sort of lining film applied to them, so that the contents don't touch the metallic structure of the can. Rather alarmingly, or at least I thought so, was the fact that cola's of all kinds were the most difficult to deal with, and second were anything with tomato products in the ingredients. Considering how much of both products are typically consumed, I thought this was pretty alarming.

                Ian
                Last edited by IanPendle; 03-12-2020, 08:15 AM. Reason: Spelling - Doh!

                Comment


                • #9


                  Its fine from a can but I recommend pouring it into a glass.
                  I have been home brewing for a few years now and like JR above I serve it from stainless Cornelius kegs. If I want to take some travelers I just pour it into bottles from the tap.
                  Mmmm beer....
                  Click image for larger version

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                  Cheers,
                  Jon

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                  • #10
                    Stop it! You folks are making me thirsty. I can't have beer any more because I'm on a Keto diet.

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                    • #11
                      Many craft beers are so over-hopped that few people could taste a difference.

                      There is the concern about the alcohol leeching stuff out of the plastic. You'll still get some of that with a bottle, due to the cap.



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                      • #12
                        What Glug said

                        Plus, here in Dallas many craft brewers hire mobile canning lines as needed. These are complete canning (or bottling) lines in the back of a semi. A hose goes in the front and cases of beer roll out the back. Small wineries also hire these contractors at bottling time.

                        Tim in D

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                        • #13
                          At one time I serviced the bottling/canning equipment in the three major Canadian breweries for a while, and I can understand the small local micro breweries going to cans.
                          It is much cheaper.
                          With bottles you have the cost of collection and then a bottle washing and inspection line, followed by a capping and filling procedure, with is way more extensive than canning. .
                          Incidentally, when I grew up in the UK, you Never saw anyone drink beer from a bottle, something that has stuck with me over the years, and have never drank beer from a bottle or a can without pouring to a glass first.
                          Max..


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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Glug View Post
                            Many craft beers are so over-hopped that few people could taste a difference.

                            There is the concern about the alcohol leeching stuff out of the plastic. You'll still get some of that with a bottle, due to the cap.


                            Agreed. I want more than just a punch in the mouth via hops. I always wonder what they're hiding behind the strong flavours. A good IPA doesn't need to sucker punch you. I would also recommend pouring into a glass rather than just consuming from a can, the glass will allow you to enjoy the smells of the beer which can be quite different from just the taste if it's been dry hopped.

                            In regards to the effects of food on aluminum, in the refrigeration industry if we know that a particular showcase will be holding products with acids or brines such as processed tomatoes or olives we will cover the aluminum and copper heat exchangers with a coating to protect them. Without this coating the aluminum will often be completely eaten away after a year or two, and the copper tubing may become susceptible to leaks as it erodes. Same products are used in Potash mines for the same reason. I don't think it's anything to be afraid of, acids and salts are a big part of what gives food flavour and our bodies are made to deal with it in moderation. Now, if you're drinking a case of coke a day you might have some issues with ulcers, but I would think the diabetes would do you in before that became a huge problem.
                            Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tom S View Post
                              I always wonder what they're hiding behind the strong flavours. A good IPA doesn't need to sucker punch you. I would also recommend pouring into a glass rather than just consuming from a can, the glass will allow you to enjoy the smells of the beer which can be quite different from just the taste if it's been dry hopped.
                              That is exactly it. So many microbreweries need to cover up off flavors, and it limits the styles of beer they can produce. In many cases there is also not much product consistency.

                              What is sad is they think a lot of that swill is worth $4 or $5 a pint. Seriously? In many cases the extract based beers I brewed way back in the early 90's were better. It sure ain't rocket science. I will almost always choose a German, Belgian or Czech beer.

                              And what Max said up above - bottling machines are a huge hassle and expense. I was there back in the day when Bell's got their first automated bottling machine. Used, of course. A huge and awesome milestone for the company, but what a headache.

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