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OT. Craft Beer issue

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    It occurs to me that I ought to try making beer. I already have hops, we have a hops vine out back (and a nasty invasive plant they are, too, I've nearly pulled it up or hit it with Roundup several times.).

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  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post

    Beer should only be drunk from a glass.
    I have never come across a beer that tastes good straight from the bottle, or even worse, a can.
    The Australians drink a lot of beer straight from the bottle, a "stubby" i believe. Certain brands in the US too. Bud? Gross.
    Most of our sense of taste is really sense of smell. Pouring the beer into a glass give it a lot more room to allow the nose to pick up the odors and we notice that as "taste". Many of the American beers from the major brewers don't have a lot in them to taste so drinking them straight from the bottle to get the "buzz" is just as good as pouring them into a glass and faster too.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    The advantage of straight from the bottle, if the bottle is amber/brown, would be the fact that it should significantly delay Pepe le Pew on his way to your beer.

    If the bottle is clear, like some A-B products, you were screwed when you bought 'em, the light won't make them worse than they started out.

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  • Mr Fixit
    replied
    Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post

    Beer should only be drunk from a glass.
    I have never come across a beer that tastes good straight from the bottle, or even worse, a can.
    The Australians drink a lot of beer straight from the bottle, a "stubby" i believe. Certain brands in the US too. Bud? Gross.
    Thaiguzzi, I couldn't agree more on the glass only philosophy. That's what started this post was my frustration with my craft beer in a can.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

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  • Forestgnome
    replied
    Originally posted by Glug View Post
    Many craft beers are so over-hopped that few people could taste a difference.

    There is the concern about the alcohol leeching stuff out of the plastic. You'll still get some of that with a bottle, due to the cap.


    It's a matter of taste. I like beers with a lot of hop. Makes a great beer for Easter!

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  • bborr01
    replied
    I used to drink Miller Lite that came in a brown bottle. Most times and places where I ordered one it would be fine but at our local Moose lodge it was always skunky. The bartender finally told me that she thought it was because the lights stayed on in the coolers 24/7. I think she was probably correct. Nowadays my taste runs more along the lines of Bells Two Hearted Ale.

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  • old mart
    replied
    That Thai beer Singha is one of my favourites. As is the Chinese Tsing Tao which originated from the original German enclave there from before the first world war.
    As for Aussies drinking direct, don't forget the temperatures there are so high that all beer is kept just above freezing, so flavour is not the most important feature.
    Last edited by old mart; 03-22-2020, 12:43 PM.

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  • thaiguzzi
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    Many of the good beers in Blighty come in bottles and cans, and I cannot tell the difference. I always use a glass. Can you get San Miguel Spanish lager in the States?
    You can buy the Duff beer as immortalised by Homer Simpson in the UK, Duff by name, duff by nature.
    Beer should only be drunk from a glass.
    I have never come across a beer that tastes good straight from the bottle, or even worse, a can.
    The Australians drink a lot of beer straight from the bottle, a "stubby" i believe. Certain brands in the US too. Bud? Gross.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Glug View Post

    Bitter chugging through chemistry! Literally.

    That Miller is brewed with a hop extract that is not susceptible to light-struck skunking. Tetrahydro Isomerized hop extract.

    Thats discussting I didn't know. Thanks. JR

    I think all of my hop came out of around the Willamette Valley. Washington State? It has been some time that I have brewed. I always did two hop-ings A boil and a steep. I boiled with green pellets from the same place I got the fresh green hops for steeping before fermentation!! LOL

    I do love making beer. JR

    Edit: Yeast next? I want to learn how to make wine from JT
    I dont know how to make wine but I can make a world class Kimchi?

    Last edited by JRouche; 03-17-2020, 03:03 AM.

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  • old mart
    replied
    Many of the good beers in Blighty come in bottles and cans, and I cannot tell the difference. I always use a glass. Can you get San Miguel Spanish lager in the States?
    You can buy the Duff beer as immortalised by Homer Simpson in the UK, Duff by name, duff by nature.
    Last edited by old mart; 03-14-2020, 06:10 PM.

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  • rustdreamer
    replied
    Promote world peace -- DRINK MORE BEER!

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

    Right, the light stays on so customers can see what beer is available and the lights are close to the bottles. While this doesn't really fit the "inverse square law" of physics since the light is not a point source, it still follows that the closer one is to the source, the more exposure one would get, the one being the bottle of beer.
    Most are LED now, and those do not have broad spectrum light. May not include ANY significant UV component. They usually have a few narrow peaks that sorta-kinda mimic the range of regular lights.

    Plants "know" the difference, for instance

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  • RMinMN
    replied
    Part ( a big part) of the enjoyment of drinking craft beer is the flavor/aroma. Drunk direct from the can or bottle, little of this is evident. Pour it into a glass (plastic tumbler if you are around the pool or at the beach) and the nice head developed releases the aroma straight to your nose when you take a sip. It won't do the same with the big brewers, their beer doesn't have the right components to get you the nice aroma anyway.

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  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    I expect you are correct. I have not done winemaking for many years and was not recalling the nature of the "vinegar bug" correctly. In any case, it can "go off" if precautions are not taken.

    Makes you wonder how they ever got good wine or beer centuries ago before the nature of the problem was understood. Just another of the closely held "secrets of the trade", presumably..



    Must be, or we'd be hearing about the skin cancer risk of fluorescent lights.... I have not heard anything about that, which does not mean there is no risk. But people do spend all day in the office under fluorescents, and at the end of the winter, they do not have a tan..... in fact if they did in the fall, they probably lost it by spring.

    The lights DO work by making UV, and having that energy excite the phosphors coating the glass, which then "fluoresce" providing the light. So one might expect that there would not be 100% blockage of the original UV, some would get through.

    I assume the coolers referenced must be of the type where "you close the door and the light STAYS ON!".
    Right, the light stays on so customers can see what beer is available and the lights are close to the bottles. While this doesn't really fit the "inverse square law" of physics since the light is not a point source, it still follows that the closer one is to the source, the more exposure one would get, the one being the bottle of beer.

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  • no704
    replied
    There are places where no glass is allowed, pools, lakes, beaches.

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