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  • #46
    Yes, I meant to say detonation instead of pinging.
    But in an engine it's still a burn and not an explosion.
    Len

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    • #47
      OK, first your assumption that "the sphere does not yield" is not correct and it CAN NOT BE. Strain is proportional to stress when the elastic limit has not been reached. So the sphere DOES yield if the pressure inside that cavity increases. And that strain will be there for as long as that higher pressure exists.

      So, when the explosive is set off, there will be a very hot gas in that cavity. That hot gas will exhibit pressure on the sphere and the sphere will respond by expanding a small amount. You assume that it does not yield so I will take that to mean it does not fail or rupture. So what happens next is basic physics. The hot gas will transmit some of it's heat energy to the sphere. And the sphere will then transmit that heat energy to the surroundings, probably the air. This will continue until equilibrium with the ambient temperature is reached. Of course as the sphere heats up it will also expand and that will also add to the change in it's size. As the gas cools the pressure it exhibits will decrease. As the sphere cools it will contract from it's expanded size due to the heat. Both the hot gas and the sphere will eventually cool to the ambient temperature. When this happens then the final state of the system (sphere and internal gas) will depend on the chemistry and physical properties of that gas mixture. New molecules can form in that mixture of gases and it is a fact that, with pressure and temperature held constant, a gas's "volume" is roughly proportional to the number of molecules in it. So if two gas molecules combe to form a single molecule of a new compound, then the "volume" of the gas will decrease. (note below) Actually, since the actual volume is relatively constant and the temperature has cooled to the ambient, it is the pressure of the gas that will decrease when the number of actual molecules decreases. Just how far this will go depends on the chemistry and physics of the interactions, as I already said.

      All in all, when the cooling process is over, the exterior of the sphere will be a small amount larger than before. And the internal pressure will be higher. Exactly how much of each is difficult to predict with a lot more knowledge of the details and some fairly complex calculations.

      Over a long period of time other effects may occur to change things. Gases can be absorbed by the walls of that internal cavity. Or they can react with the atoms or molecules of the sphere. Etc. It is entirely possible that, at some future point, the internal pressure could be reduced to the ambient air pressure that surrounds the sphere. But I have absolutely no idea what that time frame might be. Don't hold your breath.

      Note: An example of two gases becoming one with a loss of volume would be a mixture with two hydrogen molecules (H2) for every one oxygen molecule (O2). Three molecules, two hydrogen and one oxygen will burn (combine) to form two water/steam molecules. (HH) + (HH) + (OO) = 2 (H2O). The original three molecules, two hydrogen and one oxygen have become only two water or steam molecules. And the steam molecules will take up about as much volume as each of the original molecules so the final volume will be about 2/3s of the volume of the original hydrogen/oxygen mixture. This is a basic law of gases. It is true only for as long as the molecules exist as gases and not when they condense into a liquid or freeze into a solid.



      Originally posted by darryl View Post
      Just wondering if this has been done, and what the results were. I'm imagining a sphere of some size, with only a small cavity at the center of it. Explosive is contained in this cavity, and the sphere does not yield when the explosive is set off. What happens?
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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      • #48
        You guys are funny.

        So lets look at an equation that as far as I know is still viable. Its the ol matter and energy.

        Oh, now you guys remember the golden rule, one of them. E=MC(squared) You do have to remember this equation goes both ways. Remove C and the two others can be interchangeable.

        Its proven math. So now what? You can not try to exchange mass to nothing. No matter what {sic} you will always have an exchange of energy and mass.

        There is no way of getting around it. JR

        Edit: IMO I dont think there is a plot or equation that shows a complete mass to energy conversion.

        It can not happen. I have a Theory. JR
        Last edited by JRouche; 03-17-2020, 05:00 AM.

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        • #49
          The conversion between mass and energy, AIUI, only occurs in nuclear reactions. Ordinary explosions are exothermic chemical reactions that involve the release of energy contained in molecular bonds.
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

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          • #50
            Yes! Einstein would not be involved.



            Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
            The conversion between mass and energy, AIUI, only occurs in nuclear reactions. Ordinary explosions are exothermic chemical reactions that involve the release of energy contained in molecular bonds.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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            • #51
              Great science. I'm particular to Physics, not Theoretical but I will read it.I am hands on type.

              If I cant touche it, squeeze and make it be physical what is the point.

              Chasing a dream. The only theory based science I like is Ohms.

              Now. Lets stop talking abiut STNW while on Mr. Geos' place, ehh.. JR

              We are machinists. Who do you think makes that chit? JR

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              • #52
                I was holding it in just fine until the broccoli !
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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