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3D printed gears stress test

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  • 3D printed gears stress test

    PLA and ABS gears. He made a tank and ran it for 8+ hours straight at the end of the video. The gears held up, showed little wear, just some white powder which is no doubt the teeth wearing in a good involute profile.

  • #2
    For a low load like this I'm not at all surprised they did just fine.

    There are a couple of videos about using printed gears for lathe change gearing on a couple of the smaller lathes.... All good info.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6Aq0d1070I&t=10s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L6PBD6pswU
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BCRider View Post
      For a low load like this I'm not at all surprised they did just fine.

      There are a couple of videos about using printed gears for lathe change gearing on a couple of the smaller lathes.... All good info.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6Aq0d1070I&t=10s

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L6PBD6pswU
      I am wondering if I should get the Gearotic software to produce proper tooth profiles?

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      • #4
        CamBam has a basic gear tool built in.

        Its in the plugin menu under "toolkit". Can produce profiles for diametric pitch or module gears.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          I don't see that 'proper' gear profiles are necessary unless you are a) transmitting >10HP where the heat produced would matter, b) making astronomical telescope drives where the stars would blur in photographs.
          FreeCAD has a built in gear profile and hey, it's free.
          What DP are Atlas gears? I have printed a 14DP part gear (3 teeth out of 63) using a 0.4 nozzle and 3 edge runs mostly filled the tooth 4 would be sure. Meaning to do a strength test but not got round to it yet, I mean a proper test with weights not just a pair of pliers. There is a picture on the ME forum https://www.model-engineer.co.uk/for....asp?th=148202

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

            I am wondering if I should get the Gearotic software to produce proper tooth profiles?
            Gearotic works fantastic. I made the helical gears for my gatling using it. Fusion has a addon for gears too if you were not aware.
            Click image for larger versionName:	gatgears.jpgViews:	0Size:	32.4 KBID:	1863061
            Last edited by Sparky_NY; 03-21-2020, 06:34 PM.

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            • #7
              Has anyone done a comparison of durability between filament and resin printed gears?
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                Has anyone done a comparison of durability between filament and resin printed gears?
                I don't have a resin printer, otherwise I would.

                I found a formula driven involute gear generator for Solidworks that appears to actually work, so I started to print the gears for my diesel locomotive project. Starting to entertain thoughts of setting up a sort of dyno to test them in the locomotive truck under varying loads. Printed this one in PETG.
                Click image for larger version

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                • #9
                  Looks good. I'm guessing about 10DP. Solid? One of the annoying things about the Tubalcain video was his cross section of the non-solid one wa in the wrong plane so you couldn't see the body fill and tooth joint.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Baz View Post
                    Looks good. I'm guessing about 10DP. Solid? One of the annoying things about the Tubalcain video was his cross section of the non-solid one wa in the wrong plane so you couldn't see the body fill and tooth joint.
                    20dp, 50t and 15t. 20% infill, 2 perimeters. Definitely not the strongest way to go but am curious what one could get away with.

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                    • #11
                      Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        Today I learned that Lego gears are mod 1.0, 20 deg PA, and if the tooth count is divisible by 8, will work in the Lego universe. Here is a 120 tooth gear I designed, printed today. It meshes perfectly, runs true. I think 3D printed gears deserve a bit more respect than they get.
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                        • #13
                          12-year-old me would've killed for a custom LEGO gear like that. Nice job!
                          Location: Northern WI

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                            Today I learned that Lego gears are mod 1.0, 20 deg PA, and if the tooth count is divisible by 8, will work in the Lego universe. Here is a 120 tooth gear I designed, printed today. It meshes perfectly, runs true. I think 3D printed gears deserve a bit more respect than they get.
                            How much torque will they transmit before stripping off a tooth?
                            This relates back to the 3D printed change gear discussion.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                              How much torque will they transmit before stripping off a tooth?
                              This relates back to the 3D printed change gear discussion.
                              I know the test Mr.Pete did on his Atlas lathe, the lathe stalled, belt slipped before his printed change gear would yield.
                              I ordered bearings for my diesel locomotive project, some of them will take a month to get here, it is with those I will try a stress test. The gears, including the Lego one were printed in PETG. Lego's are ABS, PETG is nearly as strong as ABS.
                              The gears are printed with 3 perimeters, 20% infill. The 3 perimeters essentially create a situation where the teeth are all solid, the body is 20% infill, but the infill moves layer by layer creating a much stronger part than one would expect.
                              Well, I did hook up the Lego gear train shown in the picture and the output shaft of the big gear, I cannot stop with my hand. I attached a wheel to the output shaft of the big gear, and was able to stall the Lego motor, but not without getting the Lego axle to twist about 30 degrees. The 3d printed gear laughed at me. As far as Lego's are concerned, it is strong enough. Keep in mind, the Lego motor has its own planetary reduction gear box internally, and has a lot of torque.
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                              Last edited by RB211; 03-26-2020, 09:32 AM.

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