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JB weld, stainless-aluminum and heat

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  • JB weld, stainless-aluminum and heat

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ID:	1863027
    This is the displacer piston assy from Stirling engine I’m building. I’d like to use JB weld to secure the stainless shaft to the cap, and the cap to the long cup. I looked up the specs for heat. Web site says it can widthstand 400* continuous, 500* intermittently.
    The question is, does anyine here have any practicle experience using JB with said materials?
    Extra points if you’ve you’ve used it in this exact application!

    Thanks, Sid
    Attached Files

  • #2
    I use JB for a lot of things, but of course it works best with a large area of contact. I don't want to be a party pooper, but I don't think it will hold long term in that application.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #3
      X2 what Darryl said. I have tried it in lower heat applications -- 250-350 deg -- it softens up and falls out after a while. Better idea to solder it, IMHO.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #4
        It may be hard to see in the photo, but the joints are all labyrinth in design. For the reason to increase surface area and make self fixtureing.

        The shuttle piston is not under any compression like the power piston side. It just displaced air.

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        • #5
          I used it to repair a hole in a muffler 30 years ago. Honda 450 twin. It held up OK. I was broke, so I cut up an aluminum soda can, cleaned off the coating and slathered the JB on it. taped it in place over the blown out muffler for an afternoon. It held up till another section rusted out. Ugly as sin, but so was the rest of the bike.

          I suspect that if you use the long cure version instead of the 5 minute it will work better. The quick cure has a much lower temperature rating.

          Dan
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

          Location: SF East Bay.

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          • #6
            Soldering stainless to aluminum??? Probably not.
            If I were to solder, I would make it all out of stainless. Weight is an issue. Like to keep that to a minimum.

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            • #7
              Too much expansion and contraction going on. It won't hold for long especially in small amounts. I would go with all the same material if you can, that being stainless and silver solder or TIG.



              JL..................

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              • #8
                Well, the parts are already made. No loss to try it at this point. May have to starts turning up some 303.

                Sid

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	6E474477-30B8-4F9D-A00F-F1233CC3DF53.jpeg
Views:	202
Size:	3.66 MB
ID:	1863027
                  This is the displacer piston assy from Stirling engine I’m building. I’d like to use JB weld to secure the stainless shaft to the cap, and the cap to the long cup. I looked up the specs for heat. Web site says it can widthstand 400* continuous, 500* intermittently.
                  The question is, does anyine here have any practicle experience using JB with said materials?
                  Extra points if you’ve you’ve used it in this exact application!

                  Thanks, Sid
                  Anybody ever used this? https://solderweld.us/products/multi-sol

                  They sell it at the EAA warbirds show in FL. I have watched them demonstrate it and seems to work.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This stuff looks like it might be worth a try.

                    https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...nt=100-010-681

                    Features:
                    • Incredible temperature resistance, -350 degrees F up to 2,015 degrees F
                    • Intended for use on threads an cylindrical assemblies (flash hiders & muzzle brakes)
                    • In addition to acting as an adhesive, Rocksett acts vibration dampening material
                    • Non-toxic, odorless, and non-flammable
                    • Withstands oils, fuils, acids, and alkalis
                    • Long shelf life
                    • No mixing or priming required
                    • Bonds ceramic, glass, and metals
                    • Surfaces to be bonded should be dry and grease free
                    • Ships in a 2oz bottle


                    JL....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, I mixed up some JB. Did one part of it first. I’ll let that set tonight and then turn over and do the end cap so that there would be no chance of it dripping away, not that I think it would happen because it’s very thick.
                      Lets see how it goes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        JB Weld is an epoxy. All epoxies start to lose strength above 150 F. , some rapidly weaken above that point.

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                        • #13
                          well, there are epoxys rated for 350°c.

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                          • #14
                            Used it for years in the INLET/INTAKE ports of air cooled motorcycle cylinder heads, specifically older Brit twins and Triumphs, to no ill effect.

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                            • #15
                              My two granddaughters built small sterling engines. Their displacer piston was .370 diameter by 1.12 long made of aluminum. The cap was aluminum with the.047 rod pressed in. The drawings called for epoxy - JB weld. The original engine from issue 22 of Model Engine Builder by Norm Jones has been running at shows for many years. The two my granddaughters built not running so much but still a bit of running. They show no problem. Here is a picture of the glue up, the large ring was to hold it upright, and a link to one of the engines running along.

                              https://youtu.be/TYlPWvfav4o

                              Bob



                              Click image for larger version  Name:	Displacer-Piston.jpg Views:	0 Size:	68.3 KB ID:	1863402
                              Last edited by PS4steam; 03-23-2020, 12:29 PM.

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