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  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    Not from a validated authority, but I read that the virus did not survive temperatures above 140F. This bodes well for being able to take a mask off, wash it and dry it in the clothes dryer or the kitchen oven set to low for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Dan
    We went shopping yesterday, so today I disinfected my mask using heat. I took the guidance from the third page of this PDF, section headed "Heat Treatment of Viruses" . I'm interpreting it to say that 30 minutes at 150 degrees will kill the virus. I set up my garage toaster oven and verified the thermostat was reliable. Yep, with the dial set to 200 degrees I read a constant 155 with an oven thermometer and confirmed as being closer to 150 with a digital one.

    The mask I'm using is the Harbor Freight Western Safety Carbon Filter Neoprene Dust Mask With Replaceable Liners. It is not N95. I'm only expecting it to catch airborne viruses that are suspended in droplets. I popped it in the oven for 30 minutes and let it cool when I turned it off. I'll let you know in 21 days whether or not it was successful.



    An excerpt from https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf...67600701200206

    Incubation of SARS-CoV at 58°C or 68°C showed a
    rapid reduction in infectivity with a mean log viral reduc-
    tion (LVR) of 4.9 log 10 TCID 50 /ml after 30 minutes at
    58°C and • 4.3 log 10 TCID 50 /ml after 10 minutes heating
    at 68°C. The results are presented in (Figure 1). Not sur-
    prisingly, virus inactivation was more rapid at 68°C than
    58°C. The detection limit of the virus titration method
    (1.5 log 10 TCID 50 /ml) was reached after 30 minutes heat-
    ing at 58°C and 10 to 30 minutes heating at 68°C.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelP
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    Not from a validated authority, but I read that the virus did not survive temperatures above 140F. This bodes well for being able to take a mask off, wash it and dry it in the clothes dryer or the kitchen oven set to low for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Dan
    Don't forget that you need to deal with other pathogens found on the mask besides the virus. Coronavirus is one of the easiest to kill.
    Autoclaving or gamma irradiation would be more acceptable for a proper mask sterilization.

    But imagine a mask with your colleague's sweat, saliva and nasal discharge inside, and many less appetizing contaminants outside. How would you feel putting it on your face even after it was sterilized? It's, probably marginally acceptable if each person deals with his/her own masks only (like personal masks for use at home). He'd dispose of some, and reuse others after sterilization. Collecting used DISPOSABLE type masks from different people, manually sorting them, sterilizing and redistributing is hardly acceptable from many perspectives, incl. financial one. Old style gauze masks were, at least, washable.
    Last edited by MichaelP; 03-24-2020, 01:53 AM.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    I've been getting emails from Banggood offering face masks and other protective items, but some have complained that their prices have gone up a lot. I don't know if shipping goods from China to the US is restricted. They also have oxygen concentrators for under $300. And UV sterilizers for up to $90 for a large one. I'm not sure if it works on coronavirus, though. Most links I found seem to indicate it does.
    At least 40% of the worlds cargo is shipped in the bellies of passenger aircraft. Since they are not flying, companies like mine are working in over drive to take up the slack. HELL of a time to be sick, I could be getting 150% OT right now...

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    I've never seen a disposable mask that actually seals. I've been fitted for masks by OSHA and their testing bears this out. The cartridge-type half-face chemical masks are far superior.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glug
    replied
    That's nice. I'm sure they've been selling a Lot of them. Odd that he gave no indication of how many masks, N95's, shields and gloves they have on offer. I wonder how many they actually have left, at this very late date?

    Washing paper masks? Seriously? I am surprised to hear that, from people who have probably used them. Imagine wearing a mask for a 12 hour working shift, all that sweat and moist breathe, and somehow trying to keep it together and intact, and uncontaminated on the inside.. And then you're gonna wash it? N95 masks are thicker and more robust than single ply masks often found in shops.

    Remember that an absolutely critical aspect to biohazard protection with masks is proper fit and sealing. If it doesn't have the stiffness to seal, if it gets bent or creased, if the elastics are stretched out, etc...

    A low temp dry air "soak" for a period of time, at a particular temp, might work. But that might also break it down further.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4miller1
    replied
    Outstanding!
    That is a great example to follow.
    thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Galaxie
    replied
    Soap alone is considered sufficient:
    Originally posted by https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/ourchangingworld/audio/2018739630/covid-19-the-science-of-soap
    Professor Krause says that the lipid envelope of a coronavirus is its Achilles heel, because it is readily broken down or busted apart by soap.

    “It’s one of those viruses that a good scrubbing with soap and water does quite a good job in breaking down its composition,” says Krause.

    That’s right. A 20-second hand wash with soap and water is not just washing any viruses off your hands; it’s actually destroying the viruses in the process.

    Turns out that viruses are tough, yet fragile, and that old-fashioned soap is very effective at removing viruses from your hands before they have a chance to infect anyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post

    Or toss it (or them) into a pot of boiling water...

    -js
    Or pressure cook them in the ubiquitous instant pot! But while this would be fine for an old fashioned cloth mask, I'm not so sure for an N95. I've also heard it is very vulnerable to UV, so a few hours on the clothesline should work great too. Even cloudy days have a good amount of UV.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Stewart
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    Not from a validated authority, but I read that the virus did not survive temperatures above 140F. This bodes well for being able to take a mask off, wash it and dry it in the clothes dryer or the kitchen oven set to low for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Dan
    Or toss it (or them) into a pot of boiling water...

    -js

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Not from a validated authority, but I read that the virus did not survive temperatures above 140F. This bodes well for being able to take a mask off, wash it and dry it in the clothes dryer or the kitchen oven set to low for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • PStechPaul
    replied
    I've been getting emails from Banggood offering face masks and other protective items, but some have complained that their prices have gone up a lot. I don't know if shipping goods from China to the US is restricted. They also have oxygen concentrators for under $300. And UV sterilizers for up to $90 for a large one. I'm not sure if it works on coronavirus, though. Most links I found seem to indicate it does.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 03-22-2020, 08:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Got that email and forwarded it to a friend who is an ER doc in Newark, NJ. She had just contacted me the other day asking about supplies.

    The hospitals have GOT to figure out how to be more economical and get out of the massively disposable cycle. There was an article about how a single urban hospital was using tens of thousands of N95 masks a day, and expected to go up to 70k when the **** really hits the fan. That's just not sustainable no matter what the production! A hospital in the Midwest is bucking the FDA and using UV to disinfect masks and return them to their users repeatedly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tungsten dipper
    replied
    X2! See, they're not all bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Darn generous of them. I'm sure that the HF warehouses have only enough supplies for a few days at the rate that hospitals use them, but that may make a big difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Well, good for HF. And for the rest of us.

    Thank You HF!

    Leave a comment:

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