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Deoxidising "Aluminium"

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  • #16
    Aluminium and zinc are what is called "amphoteric" metals....meaning they do react with both acids and alaklies. Thus it makes little difference if one uses acid or alkaline conditions to descale them. Both will corrode and dissolve the metals.

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    • #17
      So long as there is no plastic or glass on it, hit it with the HOT tip and wire brush, just enough heat to start the paint to crinkle, then into it with the wire brush, that will take the paint and the scale of it and bring it back to bare metal, ready for a good primer coat.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by markx View Post
        Aluminium and zinc are what is called "amphoteric" metals....meaning they do react with both acids and alaklies. Thus it makes little difference if one uses acid or alkaline conditions to descale them. Both will corrode and dissolve the metals.
        well, according to the book i read recently, you use sulphuric to activate aluminum. maybe the acid destroys the oxides more that the aluminum itself as opposed to lye? if you have any further info on that, please share.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Ian B View Post
          Thanks for that everyone! The drain cleaner we get here has little shavings of metal (aluminium?) in it, along with the white crystals. I could certainly give that a try. If it doesn't work, at least I then get nice clean drains

          I think JCFX is right - they'll be made of a zinc alloy. Considering the mess of immersing the bits in liquid, I might just go at them with sandpaper...

          Ian
          Yes, anhydrous lye will generate heat when added to water the aluminum bits increase the heat generated by the lye in the drain cleaner to loosen
          greasy drain clogs, Draino in dry form here in the US has aluminum chips.

          You can use lye to clean aluminum, but in a very diluted form, I worked on a job building large model airliner fuselages for a commercial,
          the prep guy used a combo acid / alkaline etch on the aluminum bodies with copious rinsing to ready them for paint.

          You're just better off with a wire brush and sandpaper.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Ian B View Post
            Most of the paint has flaked off, the rest will come off either by a bit of scraping or paint stripper for any stubborn bits. Is there an easy method of getting the white furry corrosion stuff off, or does it still come down to wire brush & sandpaper?

            Thanks,

            Ian
            My Folks have some stuff like that. My dad hand wire brushes old flake and white powder and washes with soap and water, air drys then rattle cans some primer made for aluminum. And so on... JR

            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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