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  • Incarcerated Model Builder

    Here's an interesting story of a "model prisoner" in a Maryland prison.
    He does some pretty impressive work, given the limitations on tools and materials that he has to work with.
    ...of course he does have lots of time to devote to it.

    https://www.farmcollector.com/commun...6ECAE0A61DDF9F
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

  • #2
    A true modeler, is somebody who makes miniatures from NOTHING, which this person is actually doing, bloody wonderfull creations he makes too.

    Now all those persons (fools) who consider themselves a modeler, when all they do is ASSEMBLE numbered bits of pre-formed plastic, should hang their collective heads in shame, to try and call themselves something they are not.

    It kinds of 'degenerates' the name of MODELER by these pathetic plastic assemblers, using that name.

    Rant over and I'll go put on me flack jacket and hide from the forthcoming $hit storm. :-)

    Comment


    • #3
      He must have access to materials, machinery, etc. If you have to be in prison, this might be a good one to be in.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

      Comment


      • #4
        Buying his supper at the commissary, heating it in the microwave ?

        Sarge41

        Comment


        • #5
          If you read the article, you will see that his materials are mostly scrap cardboard, and his tools are items like pins and pencils, using glue and non-oil based paints. Prisons allow only limited items for obvious reasons.
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

          Comment


          • #6
            I try VERY hard to encourage model makers of all levels. Those building from kits, plastic, or metal, deserve every encouragement and some help if necessary.
            Many of them will want to go further than kit building once they know the satisfaction of being able to completing a few projects.
            Assembling a kit correctly is a great beginning in our hobby.
            I started with Meccano, and got a lot of encouragement from some adults. I had 00 gauge trains and built many plastic buildings to help make scenery.
            I now, some 60 yrs later, have an extensive workshop,a house full of working steam models( Some I have built, some I have bought) and I am still , in some ways , a beginner.
            I owe my success in the hobby, to the encouragement of others.
            Regards David Powell.

            Comment


            • #7
              PStechPaul, has got it ------- and he sure does a bloody good job with an absolute minimum of tooling.

              Jail aint got no hobby shop just around the corner past the mess hall, he has to use his mind and his hands, which he does exceedingly well.

              I will put him into the 'expert modellers class', good on him, it's sure helping him doing his time in a good productive way.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by greenie View Post
                ...Now all those persons (fools) who consider themselves a modeler, when all they do is ASSEMBLE numbered bits of pre-formed plastic, should hang their collective heads in shame, to try and call themselves something they are not.

                It kinds of 'degenerates' the name of MODELER by these pathetic plastic assemblers, using that name.

                Rant over and I'll go put on me flack jacket and hide from the forthcoming $hit storm. :-)
                Wow, I think you're going to want a full bomb disposal suit...

                Location: Northern WI

                Comment


                • #9
                  I will add that there are a few people who annoy me to the point of frenzy.
                  They are the ones who possess models which they have bought or otherwise acquired and who pretend that they have actually built the model themselves.
                  Usually they cannot sensibly answer questions about exactly how they made certain features. and they quickly reveal themselves.
                  There are a few others who very carefully imply that the model is their own work, WITHOUT actually clainiing that they built it themselves
                  .I once watched and listened to one fellow do exactly that for over 15 minutes, he left the impression on an onlooker at a show he built the part finished engine he displayed.
                  Be proud of what you do, but give full credit to those who helped or began to build your models
                  . I have had a lot of fun and pleasure finishing and repairing models built by others, and ALWAYS give full credit to the original builders.
                  Regards David Powell.

















                  I

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                  • #10
                    In my youth I built many models. Many from kits and some scratch built. Some of the kits were more challenging than the scratch built ones. But I probably learned more from the scratch built ones.

                    That's my opinion and I am sticking to it.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Building a plastic kit isn't all that big a deal BUT some people can really trick them out with homemade parts and techniques that bring the work up to a whole new level. This takes above standard skill levels.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                      • #12
                        Those are exactly the people we need to encourage. A kit builder becomes a kit modifier, a kit modifier wants to do more and becomes a scratch builder, the scratch builder then wants to do more than he or she can with purchased parts on the kitchen table and perhaps gets more tools and arranges a dedicated workplace to help . Once that happens they are hooked , Lathes, MIlls ,printers and cnc machines then follow on . all can all play a part in model making. Then we have another Home Shop Machinist.
                        Regards David Powell.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                          Here's an interesting story of a "model prisoner" in a Maryland prison.
                          He does some pretty impressive work, given the limitations on tools and materials that he has to work with.
                          ...of course he does have lots of time to devote to it.

                          https://www.farmcollector.com/commun...6ECAE0A61DDF9F
                          A great humbling read, thanx.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            yes, thank you.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Good story, just think about what he could do if he could stay out of jail.
                              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                              Comment

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