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Slitting saw help - making shaft clamps

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  • Slitting saw help - making shaft clamps

    I'm trying to make some shaft clamps like this:
    Click image for larger version

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    (this example was already destined for the "practice" bin due to being a bit keen counter boring the pocket for the clamp screw).

    Before slitting the clamp is the desired fit onto the shaft, but despite the wisdom of the internet suggesting I have a 50/50 chance of the bore opening/closing when slitting the slot Mr Murphy and Mr Sod are both frequent visitors to the shop so I'm running at 100% rate of it closing.

    Is there anything I can do to stack the odds to it opening the bore?

    Is it acceptable practice to clamp a shim in the slot and re-bore/ream the bore to get back to the desired diameter?

    Thanks

    Andy

  • #2
    you've figure it out, ream with it shimmed and clamped, slightly closed in from its nature state. When un-clamped it will spring out but still readily return to its desired diameter. Same way rings for model engines are made, just in the other direction.

    You often don't need to be that fancy though. I'd make them and if the coin toss went against me, a screwdriver in the end makes them easy to pry open a bit.....or you could do the shim clamp and ream thing at that point
    .

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    • #3
      It looks like you could reduce the OD a bit, it would open and close easier if it wasn't so thick. Possibly move the screw closer to the bore and reduce it more, it's difficult from the angle of the picture to see how close the screw is to the bore.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ATW View Post
        Is there anything I can do to stack the odds to it opening the bore?



        Thanks

        Andy
        As a first operation V the raw shafting and then weld it, the V back to size. This will put a stress in the material trying to pull it together. Now machine the collar putting the weld opposite of the screw slot. When you cut the slot the stress from the weld will open it.

        Another is to cut the opposite side of the bore like these, https://www.ruland.com/shaft-collars.html , one piece ones. This gives you a bit more flex that can be used to open the bore after slitting.

        Should you consider using a two piece collar?

        lg
        no neat sig line

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        • #5
          If it springs open, not much of a bother.
          If it springs shut, slit it again.
          Len

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          • #6
            Everyone is right on it, but here's a question? why, when shaft clamps are so cheap and available? I make shaft supports, cam arms and such all the time with similar issues, but buy my collars.
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #7
              Tap in a tapered plug before slitting to pre-load it?

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              • #8
                Have you tried to slit it and shim the slit before you bore it? In other words ,save the boring op for last.

                Steve

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                • #9
                  Are you machining from solid rod or heavy wall tubing ? The omly thing I ever had close up was 3 7/16 steel 1.25 long, with a 2 inch hole, can't remember know if it was tubing or not. It involved backing cutter out a few times , a bit of pain and no fun. I think it was on that job, that I had a 4 inch x 1/16 ? Saw explode on me a pieces flying across the shop, never found it all, think it threw the head out of tram..
                  why are you making your own ?

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the thoughts guys.

                    Yes it could be a little smaller on the OD, I may well try that on the retry.

                    I didn't want a two piece design as its position on the shaft is to be adjusted frequently - its going to form the depth stop on the mills quill, spinning the jam nuts up and down the fine thread shaft is getting tiring.

                    Welding maybe a good idea ... but my lack of welding skills would i fear introduce more problems!

                    It was solid bar bar stock.

                    I haven't tried slitting first.

                    I did have a look around (UK) suppliers and yes you can get collars, but they didn't have anything in stock that met what I was looking for and hey I've got a lathe, mill and some stock - what could possibly go wrong.

                    Andy

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                    • #11
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	Screenshot_2020-03-25-13-26-42.png Views:	0 Size:	144.1 KB ID:	1863931Click image for larger version  Name:	Screenshot_2020-03-25-13-26-42.png Views:	0 Size:	144.1 KB ID:	1863932 For around 20 bux you can get a quick release quill stop.. finger operated no slip..squeeze knurlknobs together to release.
                      Last edited by 754; 03-25-2020, 04:28 PM.

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                      • #12
                        If you have access to a Vertical Bandsaw slitting in a few spots helps,still needed a pusher to get it to open. This one is 2.5" bore and 4.375"ODClick image for larger version

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                        • #13
                          I was thinking you needed a lot of them for use on a bunch of shafting.

                          Since you're only after one of them what about a longer sleeve that isn't slit but that uses a pass through cotter to wedge lock to the shaft. Then a threaded end with about 1/4 inch of travel for a micro adjustable end cap with through hole for the shaft on the end of the sleeve. With a thumb screw on the end of the wedging cotter or split cotter and the micro adjustable feature of the end cap you'd have the best of both worlds and it would be tooless.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ATW View Post
                            I didn't want a two piece design as its position on the shaft is to be adjusted frequently - its going to form the depth stop on the mills quill, spinning the jam nuts up and down the fine thread shaft is getting tiring.
                            Andy
                            What about the pushbutton nuts? If you don't want to buy one, they're doable, but fussy to make. I use a bought one on my DP.

                            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                            • #15
                              As gelflex mentioned , there us at least one other type, plus what you are building, the one I showed goes on and off in seconds with no disassembly of the stop rod.

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