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Exploding vacuums?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post

    As I have said before, the home vac mfgs are a bunch of b s artists. That SIX hp shop vac? They got that figure by jamming a screwdriver into th e fan, and recording the highest amp draw the millisecond before it went up in flames. You will never see a true six hp motor run on a 120 volt 30 amp circuit.
    It's worse than that. It's calculating "brake" hp counting the inertia of the motor/impeller if a brake was applied over X period of time. So I guess my lathe has 40HP, at least. Put a bigger chuck on it, that's more horsepower.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • #32
      vaccums are weird. once mine exploded for no obvious reason (at least i never found out why). it didnt destroy itself but i was several meters away and got pretty frightened. at that moment i was vacuuming up the grinder but i had used it for chips before.

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      • #33
        The corvair owners club used to do exactly this at their club meets- suck gas from a bucket and time how long the vacuum would run with flames shooting out of its exhaust. Then the insurance company found out

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        • #34
          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
          I think the newer shop vacs blow up easier because they're have so much HP already ... but you notice the ads never say how much TQ.

          Nah. It's really hard to light WD40 in my experience.
          Remember when all the air compressor companies would brag about the HP of their motors calling them for example 5HP when in fact they were not even close. Had big stickers all over them saying "5HP". Then in fine print somewhere in the specs it would say "develops 5 HP at XXX number of RPM's . I used to call them "Fake 5's" You could hold it back by placing your hand on the flywheel and turning it on. No starting torque. Especially a problem if the unloader valve didn't unload ! Try starting the compressor with tank pressure against one of the pistons.

          JL......................

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          • #35
            I wonder if there is any issue with the contents of the vacuum spontaneously combusting long after you left the shop. If you were sucking up cotton waste or sawdust as well as the oil and then not emptying it right away it might cause issues later. I have never seen it even get close but there are videos out there of shop rag containers catching fire in the middle of the night.

            Brian

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            • #36
              Originally posted by bhowden View Post
              I wonder if there is any issue with the contents of the vacuum spontaneously combusting long after you left the shop. If you were sucking up cotton waste or sawdust as well as the oil and then not emptying it right away it might cause issues later. I have never seen it even get close but there are videos out there of shop rag containers catching fire in the middle of the night.

              Brian
              Probably, if you slurp up material containing "drying" oils, like linseed oil.

              "mineral" oils do not do that, but certain vegetable oils will. Ones where the carbon chain has "double bonds", oils that will "dry" in a fairly short time to form a paint like coating.

              Cooking oils typically take many days or weeks to harden, and generally do not spontaneously combust because they do not polymerize fast enough to reach ignition temperature.
              Last edited by J Tiers; 03-28-2020, 04:32 PM.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #37
                One thing I notice is that I can get a wicked static shock after vacuuming while milling canvas phenolic. We're talking major lightning strike - yeowww! Makes a normal carpet and cat-related doorknob shock seem like nothing. I can avoid it by making sure I am always touching some part of the grounded machine while vacuuming.

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