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Metal treating with CI filings?

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  • Metal treating with CI filings?

    I feel like I read somewhere about using cast iron filings in a process of treating metal such as parkeruzing etc. I know parkeruzing doesn't use cast iron. Anyone know of another process? I have saved several ounces and I am wondering if it has any uses? Thanks

  • #2
    Strange as it may sound, when I was a kid we used to feed iron filings to baby pigs. There is a vitamin deficiency that causes baby pigs to bite the tails and ears off of other baby pigs. I know that my dad had a jar of iron powder (it wasn't really iron filings) and I used to get a pinch of it out and sprinkle it on a sheet of white paper, then run a magnet around under the paper too see all the different shapes the iron powder would make on the paper. we would mix the iron powder with their food, and after a couple of doses of it, they would quit biting each other.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #3
      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
      Strange as it may sound, when I was a kid we used to feed iron filings to baby pigs. There is a vitamin deficiency that causes baby pigs to bite the tails and ears off of other baby pigs. I know that my dad had a jar of iron powder (it wasn't really iron filings) and I used to get a pinch of it out and sprinkle it on a sheet of white paper, then run a magnet around under the paper too see all the different shapes the iron powder would make on the paper. we would mix the iron powder with their food, and after a couple of doses of it, they would quit biting each other.
      Hmm.., It occurs to me that idea could be put to good use in the senate and congressional cafeterias.
      (This is a bi-partisan idea, just to be clear.)
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #4
        Why bother when there are many compounds out there that you can used for carburizing..
        if you must roll your own, you may want to try walnut shells, I think that's what Lautard used .. or peach or apricot pits..

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        • #5
          years ago I seen them used to find cracks in cast .iron heads and blocks. Used with a large 110 volt magnet. cannot remember a lot about it though.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by OKChipmaker View Post
            years ago I seen them used to find cracks in cast .iron heads and blocks. Used with a large 110 volt magnet. cannot remember a lot about it though.
            That would be Magnaflux. Works on steel crankshafts and rods too...

            -js
            There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

            Location: SF Bay Area

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 754 View Post
              Why bother when there are many compounds out there that you can used for carburizing..
              if you must roll your own, you may want to try walnut shells, I think that's what Lautard used .. or peach or apricot pits..
              The question was about "parkerizing," not "carburizing."
              (Interesting coincidence ... I just finished re-reading Lautard's color case hardening tale "Bullseye Mixture" and using the fruit pits.)
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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              • #8
                I read a few articles about parkerizing that used steel wool and stumbled across a few that substitute cast iron filings. This is what I was thinking of.

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                • #9
                  Iron filings, steel wool - doing the same job, putting iron into the solution, probably to react with the phosphoric acid?

                  Dave H. (the other one)
                  Rules are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of wise men.

                  Holbrook Model C Number 13 lathe, Testa 2U universal mill, bikes and tools

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                  • #10
                    You weren't thinking about dissolving iron filings with hydrochloric acid to make ferric chloride?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                      You weren't thinking about dissolving iron filings with hydrochloric acid to make ferric chloride?
                      Ferric chloride doesn't ring a bell. I'm sure I came across it while looking for information regarding parkerizing.

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                      • #12
                        It is Parkerizing, or phosphating. There are old recipes floating around for iron phosphating (gray Park) - those used cast iron filings. Manganese phosphating (black Park) on the other hand uses manganese dioxide or similar and some recipes call for a dollop of degreased steel wool to "condition" the bath. Here are a few fasteners for my surface grinder that I did recently with a homebrew recipe:

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	20200331_140304.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.20 MB ID:	1867837
                        Last edited by eKretz; 04-11-2020, 02:42 AM.

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                        • #13
                          You got a recipe /process for that? Source for MnO2 material?
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                          • #14
                            There is a lot of good info here:

                            https://www.finishing.com/313/45.shtml

                            That 2nd 'A' post by Dave Ruggs is basically what I do. The MnO2 I procured from a handful of dead 'D' cell alkaline batteries. Phosphoric acid from any "Clean and Etch" concrete or steel prep found at any hardware store that has it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                              It is Parkerizing, or phosphating. There are old recipes floating around for iron phosphating (gray Park) - those used cast iron filings. Manganese phosphating (black Park) on the other hand uses manganese dioxide or similar and some recipes call for a dollop of degreased steel wool to "condition" the bath. Here are a few fasteners for my surface grinder that I did recently with a homebrew recipe:

                              Click image for larger version Name:	20200331_140304.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.20 MB ID:	1867837

                              I've done the steel wool thing when I did a challenger T/A. At the time I was not aware that cast iron was a better option. I used a recipe from another car enthusiast.
                              I got manganese on Amazon recently.

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