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Best Wheel For General Dry Grinding

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  • Best Wheel For General Dry Grinding

    I recently ordered a small surface grinder. More to play with than anything else. It does not have a coolant setup, and it would not easily (at a glance) adapt to one without making a huge mess. Most of my mills have full enclosures and the one that doesn't keeps the floor pretty wet to the rear with its table top enclosure. Anyway, I saw a reference the other day to a wheel that was supposedly "better" for dry grinding.

    Any suggestions? Well, other than spend more money and get a different grinder.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    My surface grinder runs dry. I tried a Norton 5SG wheel some years ago and it outperformed any of the standard AlOx wheels I had used previously, so it is my standard go to now. It runs cooler and longer between dressings and shows less wear in general. Expensive but the best stuff usually is. https://www.nortonabrasives.com/en-u...olroom-wheel-4

    I use a 46 grit similar to this:https://www.amazon.com/Norton-5SG46-.../dp/B00BBZ7MV8

    RWO

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    • #3
      46 G-J are the most common wheels used for multi purpose dry grinding.. It's also advisable to have a dust hood similar to this:

      https://bullseyeindustrialsales.com/...15v-1ph-110522

      If all else fails you can fabricate one. I made the one in post #5 from an LB conduit elbow. It's on a slide so it can be adjusted to the height of the piece being ground.

      https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...rinder-281863/

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      • #4
        I've tried dozens of different wheels in several brands. I've never used flood coolant. My machine isn't set up for it. I do have a mister that I use once in a while or I use an eye dropper for small stuff. I do most of my grinding dry, always have. Anyway, after several years of truing different wheels I found that the two listed below have worked better than any others I have tried.
        The Triumph ruby wheel holds out a lot longer between dressing, and doesn't generate as much heat as some of the other I've tried. I use the 60 grit JK wheel.

        https://www.kbctools.com/itemdetail/1-595-58004

        https://www.kbctools.com/itemdetail/1-705-005

        JL...............

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
          I recently ordered a small surface grinder. More to play with than anything else. It does not have a coolant setup, and it would not easily (at a glance) adapt to one without making a huge mess. Most of my mills have full enclosures and the one that doesn't keeps the floor pretty wet to the rear with its table top enclosure. Anyway, I saw a reference the other day to a wheel that was supposedly "better" for dry grinding.

          Any suggestions? Well, other than spend more money and get a different grinder.
          Is it 3ph powered,it's been mentioned that 1ph will not work for surface grinders.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

            Is it 3ph powered,it's been mentioned that 1ph will not work for surface grinders.
            You know, ive always wondered, why is that? From what ive gathered, single-phase motors run a bit rougher and that miniscule bit of roughness can affect the surface finish, but how much of a difference can that actually make for the smaller grinders? Like, i can understand why it would be a priority on a big, solid, industrial machine thats bolted to a floor and is well built enough that the motor phase is the only thing that can possibly effect the finish, but does that hold true on your average 6x12?

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            • #7
              Well that's interesting, I've often wondered this myself. So is the finnish affected by running your machine off a VFD or phase converter ?

              JL...

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              • #8
                Quality American made surface and tool grinders "were" available from the factory with single phase motors ( note, I said "were" since I don't believe many quality grinders are made in this country anymore). You'd think if it was really a big issue they wouldn't have done it, huh?

                A few years back at least of the "experts" mentioned the single phase issue. A few noobs picked up on it and have since brought it up occasionally. You'd think having a carefully balanced motor would be more of an issue.

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                • #9
                  I heard something along those lines years ago in a gunsmith's shop about lathes. The gunsmith had a single phase machine and he made world class hunting and target rifles that literally sold all over the country, and he still believed his single phase machine was inferior.
                  *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Back in the day I used Simonds garnet wheels. Ran them dry and they did great.
                    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                    Lewis Grizzard

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                    • #11
                      Single phase motor vibration is magnetically induced torsional. My Boyar-Schultz 6x18 grinder motor is single phase and drives the spindle with a v-belt. Identical grinders, except with 3-phase motors, that I have seen are all direct drive. I do not know if my grinder would work better with 3-phase motor and I will never know since I don't use it enough to invest in a new motor and VFD.

                      RWO

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
                        I heard something along those lines years ago in a gunsmith's shop about lathes. The gunsmith had a single phase machine and he made world class hunting and target rifles that literally sold all over the country, and he still believed his single phase machine was inferior.
                        If you have a typical lightweight hobby lathe, the single phase will definitely help create chatter. My Logan is not as lightweight as many are, but there was a huge change when I installed 3 phase, it stopped the totally uncontrollable chatter which it had been subject to, and it also (it's a flat belt machine) stopped the problems I had with belt slipping.

                        The uneven torque from single phase will induce chatter if the structure is subject to it, and mine also seemed to always throw a belt if it slipped the least bit. After, it may still have chatter, but changing speed etc always fixes it, when it never did before. And, the belt slipping can be controlled by letting up on the feed, etc, and it will track right back where it should. Also it seems to have more torque before slipping than it did before.

                        So a heavy machine such as a gunsmith would likely have, is not going to be as sensitive. Also, a motor which has both a start AND a run capacitor will be smoother than one with just a start cap. That is more common with better motors and larger motors, which a larger and heavier machine is likely to have.

                        It is wrong to just say "lathe", or "single phase motor", because they are not all the same, and may act quite differently. Generalizing is not appropriate when combined with "absolutist" words like "inferior"... "always".... etc.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post



                          So a heavy machine such as a gunsmith would likely have, is not going to be as sensitive. Also, a motor which has both a start AND a run capacitor will be smoother than one with just a start cap. That is more common with better motors and larger motors, which a larger and heavier machine is likely to have.

                          It is wrong to just say "lathe", or "single phase motor", because they are not all the same, and may act quite differently. Generalizing is not appropriate when combined with "absolutist" words like "inferior"... "always".... etc.
                          Thanks for elaborating on this Tiers,so many have the Absolute opinion (All 1ph motors are vibrating garbage).Nearly all my machines are 1ph powered and I have been happy with there performance.My Lathe that came out of a Tool&Die Shop and I repowered 1ph, the Machinist that ran for years came out to school me and he said he noticed no difference on performance and finish.

                          Does TEFC Farm Duty Motors have run capacitors or just start capacitor,5hp is what I have mostly?

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                          • #14
                            I wonder if a 4 pole might be inherently smoother than a 2 pole motor. Electrically better balanced.
                            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                            Comment

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